scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Journal ArticleDOI

Personal norms in a globalized world: Norm-activation processes and reduced clothing consumption

01 Mar 2019-Journal of Cleaner Production (Elsevier)-Vol. 212, pp 941-949
TL;DR: The authors explored the expression of personal norms as well as intentions to reduce clothing consumption and found evidence for positive relationships between identification with and care for all humanity (IWAH) and NAM variables.
About: This article is published in Journal of Cleaner Production.The article was published on 2019-03-01 and is currently open access. It has received 69 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Sustainable consumption & Norm (social).

Summary (2 min read)

1. Introduction

  • For decades, the consumption of goods and services has helped to meet basic physiological human needs, such as food and shelter, as well as psychological needs for e. g. gaining prestige or demonstrating individuality.
  • Against this backcloth, changing consumption patterns towards more sustainable ways of consuming clothing is of utmost importance to protect the environment and alleviate social problems.
  • The Norm Activation Model (NAM) is one psychological approach to identify individual characteristics that lead to or hinder engaging in specific behaviors.

2. Conceptual Framework

  • Antecedents for these personal norms are awareness of need, an ascription of responsibility and outcome efficacy.
  • Two dimensions of IWAH – self-definition and self-investment – are both directly related to personal norms and indirectly through antecedents.
  • H2: There is a significant positive relationship between personal norms to reduce personal clothing consumption and 2a: the awareness of environmental and ethical issues within clothing production, 2b: the ascription of responsibility for these issues, 2c: outcome efficacy beliefs regarding the ability to remedy them with one’s actions.
  • Hence, identification with the most inclusive ‘in-group’ of all humans may contribute to behaviors that serve all humans, such as behaviors that tackle global environmental and social problems.
  • The framework of Construal Level Theory (CLT) (Liberman & Yaacov, 2008; Trope & Liberman, 2010) can help to understand these inconsistencies.

3. Method and Data

  • An online survey, administered by the research institute Qualtrics, was carried out in four countries between October 2016 and February 2017 with a target population aged 18 to 65.
  • The four countries are the United States as the worldwide biggest market for apparel and footwear, Germany as Europe’s biggest market, Sweden as the biggest market among the Scandinavian countries and Poland as biggest Eastern European market (Euromonitor, 2017).
  • (1) Refrain from buying clothing about which I have environmental concerns and (2) buy fewer clothing items than usually/before.
  • Besides, the authors measured identification with one’s community and nation.
  • 3. Statistical analyses Firstly, the descriptive structure of the data was explored using STATA 14.2.

4. Results

  • 1. Descriptive results and prevalence of reduced clothing consumption behaviors Descriptive statistics of all scales and control variables are depicted in Table 1.
  • Asked about their intention not to consume clothing deemed problematic in next three months, 37% of the participants indicated that they disagree having this intention .
  • Satisfactory Composite Reliability (CR ≥ 0.84), Average Variance Extracted (AVE ≥ 0.64) and Maximum Shared Variance (MSV ≤ 0.55) scores for each factor established reliability, convergent and discriminant validity of the model factors (Hair et al., 2010).
  • Figure 3 indicates standardized path coefficients and the explained variance of the dependent variables (R2) for the structural part of the model.
  • Furthermore, significant direct positive relationships are found between IWAH components and awareness of need, an ascription of responsibility and outcome efficacy.

5. Discussion

  • The current paper identifies psychological factors that are related to a person’s intention to reduce their clothing consumption.
  • The current study examines psychological antecedents for the development of a felt personal obligation, or personal norm, to reduce personal clothing consumption due to environmental concerns.

Did you find this useful? Give us your feedback

Citations
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Examination of the literature as well as industrial practices shows that the current sustainable operations in TA industry are far away from realizing the goals of economic growth going hand-in-hand with the social and environmental sustainability.
Abstract: Motivated by United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the importance of sustainability, this study examines how the textile and apparel (TA) supply chains can comply with the SDGs. By examining the literature as well as industrial practices, we show that the current sustainable operations in TA industry are far away from realizing the goals of economic growth going hand-in-hand with the social and environmental sustainability. For instance, among the SDGs, the goals of “Responsible Consumption and Production”, “Clean Water and Sanitation”, and “Climate Action” receive a considerable amount of attention, while goals of “No Poverty”, “Reduced Inequalities”, “Life below Water” and “Life on Land” have the least attention. Balanced sustainable development actions from the stakeholders’ perspective are proposed. Managerial implications and future studies are discussed.

90 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the protection motivation theory is applied to investigate threat appraisal and coping appraisal as potential motivators for taking climate change more seriously and engaging in pro-environmental behavior.
Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic has created sudden, rapid, and unprecedented change in almost every possible aspect of the general population's behavior. Despite its devastating consequences, the COVID-19 pandemic can alter individual behavior towards responsible environmental actions. This study provides an in-depth analysis of how the COVID-19 pandemic has changed pro-environmental beliefs and behavior. We compare pre-COVID-19 recycling and consumption reduction with post-COVID-19 intentions, focusing on the COVID-19 pandemic's role in catalyzing the change. The protection motivation theory is applied to investigate threat appraisal and coping appraisal as potential motivators for taking climate change more seriously and engaging in pro-environmental behavior. A tailor-made survey carried out during the national lockdown imposed in March–April 2020 in Israel served for the analysis. A generalized ordered probit estimated on a sample of 296 respondents served to validate the behavioral model. The results confirm that threat and coping appraisal are drivers of behavioral change towards pro-environmental behavior. The results show that: i) 40% of low-intensity recyclers are likely to increase recycling compared to 20% of high-intensity recyclers; ii) following the COVID-19 outbreak, 40% intend to consume less; iii) the changes are catalyzed by threat and coping appraisal; iv) taking climate change more seriously following the pandemic is a function of the individual's perceived association between COVID-19 and climate change, external knowledge, income loss due to the pandemic, self-resilience, and ecocentric beliefs; v) self-resilient attitudes lead to positive behavioral change, while anthropocentric beliefs impede changes towards sustainable behavior.

52 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Social Identity Model of Pro-Environmental Action is built on and extended and allows predictions of previously not explicitly included concepts of place attachment, nature connectedness, basic psychological needs, and systems thinking to serve as a guiding framework for a better understanding of the transformation towards a sustainable future.

40 citations


Cites background from "Personal norms in a globalized worl..."

  • ...This concept that captures all humans as part of an ingroup is 328 predictive of many pro-social and pro-environmental outcomes (for an overview, see 329 McFarland et al., 2019; for relations with pro-environmental behaviour and policy support, 330 refer to Batalha & Reynolds, 2012; Joanes, 2019; Loy & Reese, 2019; Renger & Reese, 2017; 331 for related work on conflict resolution or responses to inequalities, see Wohl & Branscombe, 332 2005; Reese, Proch, & Cohrs, 2014)....

    [...]

  • ...…(for an overview, see McFarland et al., 2019; for relations with pro-environmental behaviour and policy support, refer to Batalha & Reynolds, 2012; Joanes, 2019; Loy & Reese, 2019; Renger & Reese, 2017; for related work on conflict resolution or responses to inequalities, see Wohl & Branscombe,…...

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , the authors proposed a model to gain a deeper understanding of how technological innovations help achieve a successfully sustainable fashion, while simultaneously improving sustainability practices, and fashion startup managers can use the proposed model.
Abstract: The consumption of unsustainable fashion and wasteful practices have recently attracted significant attention in practice and academia. The global fashion industry is expected to grow from $1.5 trillion in 2020 to approximately $2.25 trillion by 2025, indicating a continuous growth in demand. New technological developments are used to transition to a green economy and to promote an environmentally conscious fashion movement. Technology may seem counterintuitive, but becoming more sustainable is crucial for fashion, which is often an accelerant of waste. Sustainable fashion technologies significantly impact waste reduction through materials, products, and consumer experiences. Material changes made by environmentally conscious businesses improve longevity and reduce resource consumption. Fashion startup managers can use the proposed model to gain a deeper understanding of how technological innovations help achieve a successfully sustainable fashion, while simultaneously improving sustainability practices.

36 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that the effectiveness of social norm interventions depends on one's own internal moral compass, as presented by personal norms, and they examine this main assumption across three studies focusing on pro-environmental behavior in a food and diets context.

34 citations


Cites background from "Personal norms in a globalized worl..."

  • ...Indeed, research indicates that the stronger one’s personal norm towards a pro-environmental behavior, the stronger their intention/behavior related to this norm (e.g., Aertens, Mondaelers, Van Huylenbroek, & Verbeke, 2009; Joanes, 2019; Onwezen, Antonides, & Bartels, 2013)....

    [...]

References
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1973
TL;DR: In this paper, a six-step framework for organizing and discussing multivariate data analysis techniques with flowcharts for each is presented, focusing on the use of each technique, rather than its mathematical derivation.
Abstract: Offers an applications-oriented approach to multivariate data analysis, focusing on the use of each technique, rather than its mathematical derivation. The text introduces a six-step framework for organizing and discussing techniques with flowcharts for each. Well-suited for the non-statistician, this applications-oriented introduction to multivariate analysis focuses on the fundamental concepts that affect the use of specific techniques rather than the mathematical derivation of the technique. Provides an overview of several techniques and approaches that are available to analysts today - e.g., data warehousing and data mining, neural networks and resampling/bootstrapping. Chapters are organized to provide a practical, logical progression of the phases of analysis and to group similar types of techniques applicable to most situations. Table of Contents 1. Introduction. I. PREPARING FOR A MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS. 2. Examining Your Data. 3. Factor Analysis. II. DEPENDENCE TECHNIQUES. 4. Multiple Regression. 5. Multiple Discriminant Analysis and Logistic Regression. 6. Multivariate Analysis of Variance. 7. Conjoint Analysis. 8. Canonical Correlation Analysis. III. INTERDEPENDENCE TECHNIQUES. 9. Cluster Analysis. 10. Multidimensional Scaling. IV. ADVANCED AND EMERGING TECHNIQUES. 11. Structural Equation Modeling. 12. Emerging Techniques in Multivariate Analysis. Appendix A: Applications of Multivariate Data Analysis. Index.

37,124 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This chapter discusses Structural Equation Modeling: An Introduction, and SEM: Confirmatory Factor Analysis, and Testing A Structural Model, which shows how the model can be modified for different data types.
Abstract: I Introduction 1 Introduction II Preparing For a MV Analysis 2 Examining Your Data 3 Factor Analysis III Dependence Techniques 4 Multiple Regression Analysis 5 Multiple Discriminate Analysis and Logistic Regression 6 Multivariate Analysis of Variance 7 Conjoint Analysis IV Interdependence Techniques 8 Cluster Analysis 9 Multidimensional Scaling and Correspondence Analysis V Moving Beyond the Basic Techniques 10 Structural Equation Modeling: Overview 10a Appendix -- SEM 11 CFA: Confirmatory Factor Analysis 11a Appendix -- CFA 12 SEM: Testing A Structural Model 12a Appendix -- SEM APPENDIX A Basic Stats

23,353 citations

Book ChapterDOI
09 Jan 2004
TL;DR: A theory of intergroup conflict and some preliminary data relating to the theory is presented in this article. But the analysis is limited to the case where the salient dimensions of the intergroup differentiation are those involving scarce resources.
Abstract: This chapter presents an outline of a theory of intergroup conflict and some preliminary data relating to the theory. Much of the work on the social psychology of intergroup relations has focused on patterns of individual prejudices and discrimination and on the motivational sequences of interpersonal interaction. The intensity of explicit intergroup conflicts of interests is closely related in human cultures to the degree of opprobrium attached to the notion of "renegade" or "traitor." The basic and highly reliable finding is that the trivial, ad hoc intergroup categorization leads to in-group favoritism and discrimination against the out-group. Many orthodox definitions of "social groups" are unduly restrictive when applied to the context of intergroup relations. The equation of social competition and intergroup conflict rests on the assumptions concerning an "ideal type" of social stratification in which the salient dimensions of intergroup differentiation are those involving scarce resources.

14,812 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A protection motivation theory is proposed that postulates the three crucial components of a fear appeal to be (a) the magnitude of noxiousness of a depicted event; (b) the probability of that event's occurrence; and (c) the efficacy of a protective response.
Abstract: A protection motivation theory is proposed that postulates the three crucial components of a fear appeal to be (a) the magnitude of noxiousness of a depicted event; (b) the probability of that event's occurrence; and (c) the efficacy of a protective response. Each of these communication variables initiates corresponding cognitive appraisal processes that mediate attitude change. The proposed conceptualization is a special case of a more comprehensive theoretical schema: expectancy-value theories. Several suggestions are offered for reinterpreting existing data, designing new types of empirical research, and making future studies more comparable. Finally, the principal advantages of protection motivation theory over the rival formulations of Janis and Leventhal are discussed.

4,719 citations


"Personal norms in a globalized worl..." refers result in this paper

  • ...Additionally, similar results are found within the application of Protection Motivation Theory, which includes ‘the availability and effectiveness of a coping response’ (Rogers, 1975, p. 97) as an important component for attitude change....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Supporting this analysis, research shows that the various distances are cognitively related to each other, that theySimilarly influence and are influenced by level of mental construal, and that they similarly affect prediction, preference, and action.
Abstract: People are capable of thinking about the future, the past, remote locations, another person's perspective, and counterfactual alternatives. Without denying the uniqueness of each process, it is proposed that they constitute different forms of traversing psychological distance. Psychological distance is egocentric: Its reference point is the self in the here and now, and the different ways in which an object might be removed from that point-in time, in space, in social distance, and in hypotheticality-constitute different distance dimensions. Transcending the self in the here and now entails mental construal, and the farther removed an object is from direct experience, the higher (more abstract) the level of construal of that object. Supporting this analysis, research shows (a) that the various distances are cognitively related to each other, (b) that they similarly influence and are influenced by level of mental construal, and (c) that they similarly affect prediction, preference, and action.

4,114 citations

Frequently Asked Questions (2)
Q1. What contributions have the authors mentioned in the paper "Personal norms in a globalized world: norm-activation processes and reduced clothing consumption" ?

Additionally, the study allows drawing implications for developing future interventions aiming at fostering reduced clothing consumption. 

As the current study has not measured collective efficacy, this idea can not be further tested, and future research would have to analyze the connection between IWAH, collective efficacy and personal efficacy more in detail. Equally, future studies should seek to understand how far this translates into the environmental domain and specifically to outcome efficacy as the perception that one ’ s actions can have an impact on environmental and social issues. 5. 2. Limitations and future studies Furthermore, the study only assesses intentions for future reduction of clothing consumption, and research across multiple behavior domains has repeatedly shown that it is often a long way from intention to behavior ( Carrington, Zwick, & Neville, 2015 ). 

Trending Questions (1)
How can subjective norms be used to encourage sustainable consumption?

The paper does not specifically mention subjective norms or how they can be used to encourage sustainable consumption. The paper focuses on personal norms and the concept of identification with and care for all humanity (IWAH) in relation to reducing clothing consumption.