scispace - formally typeset

Journal ArticleDOI

Physical activity in patients with grown-up congenital heart defects after comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation.

30 Nov 2014-Vol. 11, Iss: 4, pp 452-458

TL;DR: The CCR-GUCH program appears to be a justified supplement to holistic care in the late rehabilitation of patients after the surgical correction of congenital heart defects.

AbstractIntroduction: The group of grown-up patients with congenital heart defects (grown-up congenital heart – GUCH) complains of a number of specific medical and non-medical problems. The presented program of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CCR-GUCH), dedicated to the above mentioned group, can potentially improve the physical activity of GUCH patients. Aim: The aim of the study was to assess the effect of the comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation program on the physical activity of GUCH patients. Material and methods: The invitation to take part in the CCR-GUCH program was addressed to a group of 57 patients (mean age: 23.7 ± 4.1 years) who had undergone the surgical correction of ventricular septal defects (VSD) or atrial septal defects (ASD) at least 12 months earlier. The pa tients were divided into two groups: A – patients undergoing rehabilitation, and B – patients who did not participate in the program. The patients were initially examined using functional and stress tests, and the program of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation was started in group A. After 30 days, the patients from both groups underwent further testing using the same methods as during the initial evaluation. Results: After one month of rehabilitation, the physical activity parameters of patients participating in the CCR-GUCH program (group A) were significantly better than those observed among non-participants (group B). Conclusions: The introduction of the comprehensive rehabilitation program improves the physical activity and, consequently, the quality of life of GUCH patients. The CCR-GUCH program appears to be a justified supplement to holistic care

Topics: GUCH (73%), Atrial septal defects (57%), Rehabilitation (52%)

...read more

Content maybe subject to copyright    Report

Citations
More filters

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The evidence is very uncertain about the effect of physical activity and exercise interventions on HRQoL, and three types of intervention were identified: physical activity promotion; exercise training; and inspiratory muscle training.
Abstract: Background Congenital heart disease (ConHD) affects approximately 1% of all live births. People with ConHD are living longer due to improved medical intervention and are at risk of developing non-communicable diseases. Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is reduced in people with ConHD, who deteriorate faster compared to healthy people. CRF is known to be prognostic of future mortality and morbidity: it is therefore important to assess the evidence base on physical activity interventions in this population to inform decision making. Objectives To assess the effectiveness and safety of all types of physical activity interventions versus standard care in individuals with congenital heart disease. Search methods We undertook a systematic search on 23 September 2019 of the following databases: CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, AMED, BIOSIS Citation Index, Web of Science Core Collection, LILACS and DARE. We also searched ClinicalTrials.gov and we reviewed the reference lists of relevant systematic reviews. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials (RCT) that compared any type of physical activity intervention against a 'no physical activity' (usual care) control. We included all individuals with a diagnosis of congenital heart disease, regardless of age or previous medical interventions. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors (CAW and CW) independently screened all the identified references for inclusion. We retrieved and read all full papers; and we contacted study authors if we needed any further information. The same two independent reviewers who extracted the data then processed the included papers, assessed their risk of bias using RoB 2 and assessed the certainty of the evidence using the GRADE approach. The primary outcomes were: maximal cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) assessed by peak oxygen consumption; health-related quality of life (HRQoL) determined by a validated questionnaire; and device-worn 'objective' measures of physical activity. Main results We included 15 RCTs with 924 participants in the review. The median intervention length/follow-up length was 12 weeks (12 to 26 interquartile range (IQR)). There were five RCTs of children and adolescents (n = 500) and 10 adult RCTs (n = 424). We identified three types of intervention: physical activity promotion; exercise training; and inspiratory muscle training. We assessed the risk of bias of results for CRF as either being of some concern (n = 12) or at a high risk of bias (n = 2), due to a failure to blind intervention staff. One study did not report this outcome. Using the GRADE method, we assessed the certainty of evidence as moderate to very low across measured outcomes. When we pooled all types of interventions (physical activity promotion, exercise training and inspiratory muscle training), compared to a 'no exercise' control CRF may slightly increase, with a mean difference (MD) of 1.89 mL/kg-1/min-1 (95% CI -0.22 to 3.99; n = 732; moderate-certainty evidence). The evidence is very uncertain about the effect of physical activity and exercise interventions on HRQoL. There was a standardised mean difference (SMD) of 0.76 (95% CI -0.13 to 1.65; n = 163; very low certainty evidence) in HRQoL. However, we could pool only three studies in a meta-analysis, due to different ways of reporting. Only one study out of eight showed a positive effect on HRQoL. There may be a small improvement in mean daily physical activity (PA) (SMD 0.38, 95% CI -0.15 to 0.92; n = 328; low-certainty evidence), which equates to approximately an additional 10 minutes of physical activity daily (95% CI -2.50 to 22.20). Physical activity and exercise interventions likely result in an increase in submaximal cardiorespiratory fitness (MD 2.05, 95% CI 0.05 to 4.05; n = 179; moderate-certainty evidence). Physical activity and exercise interventions likely increase muscular strength (MD 17.13, 95% CI 3.45 to 30.81; n = 18; moderate-certainty evidence). Eleven studies (n = 501) reported on the outcome of adverse events (73% of total studies). Of the 11 studies, six studies reported zero adverse events. Five studies reported a total of 11 adverse events; 36% of adverse events were cardiac related (n = 4); there were, however, no serious adverse events related to the interventions or reported fatalities (moderate-certainty evidence). No studies reported hospital admissions. Authors' conclusions This review summarises the latest evidence on CRF, HRQoL and PA. Although there were only small improvements in CRF and PA, and small to no improvements in HRQoL, there were no reported serious adverse events related to the interventions. Although these data are promising, there is currently insufficient evidence to definitively determine the impact of physical activity interventions in ConHD. Further high-quality randomised controlled trials are therefore needed, utilising a longer duration of follow-up.

11 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Results of hybrid treatment in children with congenital heart disease in this centre in 2008-2013 encourage further development of these methods and strategies to provide optimal benefits for the patients.
Abstract: Wstep: Mimo ciąglego postepu w zakresie technik diagnostycznych i terapeutycznych w ostatnich latach brakuje istotnego postepu w leczeniu wrodzonych wad serca. Czynione są intensywne wysilki w kierunku doskonalenia kardiochirurgicznych technik operacyjnych oraz interwencji kardiologicznych, a takze lączenia ich w celu uzyskania lepszego wyniku terapii. Zabiegi hybrydowe w leczeniu wrodzonych wad serca u dzieci zyskują coraz wiekszą popularnośc, rozszerza sie zakres wad serca leczonych w ten sposob oraz populacja pacjentow mogących byc beneficjentami terapii hybrydowej. Wspolcześnie procedury hybrydowe stosuje sie w sytuacjach, gdy rutynowe zabiegi kardiochirurgiczne lub przezskorne zabiegi interwencyjne nie przynioslyby zadowalającego efektu terapeutycznego. Cel: Celem pracy bylo przedstawienie wlasnych doświadczen ośrodka we wdrazaniu i praktycznym zastosowaniu procedur hybrydowych w leczeniu wybranych wrodzonych wad serca u dzieci w latach 2008–2013. Metody: Retrospektywnej analizie poddano wlasny material stanowiący grupe 80 pacjentow kwalifikowanych do procedur hybrydowych, wykonanych na Oddziale Kardiochirurgii Dzieciecej PCT w Gdansku. Wyniki: Wśrod prezentowanej grupy 80 pacjentow zyje 73 dzieci; zanotowano 4 zgony wczesne i 3 poźne. Wnioski: Zabiegi hybrydowe u dzieci z wrodzonymi wadami serca lączą doświadczenia kardiochirurgii oraz kardiologii interwencyjneji stanowią dodatkową opcje terapii dla wybranej grupy pacjentow. Wstepne wyniki leczenia hybrydowego są zachetą do dalszego rozwoju opisywanych metod i wypracowywania strategii w celu osiągniecia optymalnej korzyści dla pacjenta.

6 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A future aim will be to quantify the visceral component of the adipose tissue in ACHD patients and examine their body composition in order to reflect their risk of acquired cardiovascular disease better, and either to maintain or achieve an adequate visceral component.
Abstract: Background and aims Adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) are at risk of overweight and obesity, two major health problems, though underweight can be a negative prognostic factor too. Awareness of the body mass index (BMI) in ACHD is very limited. The present study describes the use and prevalence of BMI in Italian symptomatic hospitalized ACHD patients in relation to complexity by Bethesda system classification, diagnosis, sex and age. Methods and results We classified 1388 ACHD patients, aged 18–69 years, on the basis of their BMI, and compared them to the Italian reference population. In our total ACHD population we found a significantly higher prevalence of underweight compared to the Italian reference population (6.34% vs 3.20%). ACHD women were more underweight than men. Underweight decreased with age. Overweight was significantly less frequent in the total ACHD population (26.73% compared to 31.70%) in the Italian reference population. Men were more likely to be overweight than women. In statistical terms obesity was similar in the Italian reference population (10.50%) and our ACHD population (9.58%). Both overweight and obesity increased with age. Results were comparable using a diagnostic anatomical-functional classification and the Bethesda system classification. Conclusions In our cohort of ACHD the prevalence of underweight was double that of the Italian reference population. The prevalence of overweight was lower, while obesity was similar. Since BMI does not account for differences in body fat distribution, a future aim will be to quantify the visceral component of the adipose tissue in ACHD patients and examine their body composition in order to reflect their risk of acquired cardiovascular disease better, and either to maintain or achieve an adequate visceral component.

2 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
31 Mar 2016
TL;DR: It is concluded that physical activity associated with a heavy load in people with uncorrected CHD who have not developed pulmonary hypertension and reverse right-to-left flow seems to be safe, while participation of grown-up patients with congenital heart disease (GUCH) in extreme mountain climbing requires special preparation, individually designed endurance training and education program, conducted by the team of professionals in specialist centers.
Abstract: Congenital heart defects (CHD) are the cause of reduced physical performance. The presence of congenital abnormalities in the heart of grown-up patients contributes to excessive hypo-kinesia. We present endurance parameters and a personalized comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation program before an extreme mountain climbing of a 27-year-old patient with an uncorrected ventricular septal defect (VSD). A 26-year-old female patient with an uncorrected congenital VSD was admitted to the department of cardiac rehabilitation before the planned high-mountain expedition. Professional preparation and assessment of actual exercise capacity was performed before scheduled extreme climbing. We conclude that physical activity associated with a heavy load in people with uncorrected CHD who have not developed pulmonary hypertension and reverse right-to-left flow seems to be safe, while participation of grown-up patients with congenital heart disease (GUCH) in extreme mountain climbing requires special preparation, individually designed endurance training and education program, conducted by the team of professionals in specialist centers.

Cites background or methods from "Physical activity in patients with ..."

  • ...CCR-GUCH was based on an endurance cardiac program, with activation of respiratory muscles and elements of strength training....

    [...]

  • ...Since research on small groups and descriptions of clinical cases are treated in accordance with the principles of EBM as not very strong evidence, it is desirable to extend the research on the impact of CCR and high mountain expeditions on population of young adults with hemodynamically insignificant CHD. Kardiochirurgia i Torakochirurgia Polska 2016; 13 (1) 71...

    [...]

  • ...Directly after the completion of individualized CCRGUCH training, the patient underwent a CPX to check and prove the ability to undertake difficulties of the expedition....

    [...]

  • ...The form of an individualized comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation program (CCR-GUCH) is preferred [1]....

    [...]

  • ...In view of the strong plans of highmountain climbing with a summer Mont Blanc expedition, the patient was admitted for a three-week’s long personalized comprehensive CCR-GUCH program....

    [...]


References
More filters

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: ABI : ankle–brachial index ACCORD : Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes ADVANCE : Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Preterax and Diamicron Modified Release Controlled Evaluation AGREE : Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation AHA : American Heart Association apoA1 : apolipoprotein A1 apoB : apolipoprotein B CABG : coronary artery bypass graft surgery CARDS : Collaborative AtoRvastatin Diabetes Study CCNAP : Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions CHARISMA : Clopidogrel for High Athero-thrombotic Risk and Ischemic Stabilisation, Management, and Avoidance CHD : coronary heart disease CKD : chronic kidney disease COMMIT : Clopidogrel and Metoprolol in Myocardial Infarction Trial CRP : C-reactive protein CURE : Clopidogrel in Unstable Angina to Prevent Recurrent Events CVD : cardiovascular disease DALYs : disability-adjusted life years DBP : diastolic blood pressure DCCT : Diabetes Control and Complications Trial ED : erectile dysfunction eGFR : estimated glomerular filtration rate EHN : European Heart Network EPIC : European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition EUROASPIRE : European Action on Secondary and Primary Prevention through Intervention to Reduce Events GFR : glomerular filtration rate GOSPEL : Global Secondary Prevention Strategies to Limit Event Recurrence After MI GRADE : Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation HbA1c : glycated haemoglobin HDL : high-density lipoprotein HF-ACTION : Heart Failure and A Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of Exercise TraiNing HOT : Hypertension Optimal Treatment Study HPS : Heart Protection Study HR : hazard ratio hsCRP : high-sensitivity C-reactive protein HYVET : Hypertension in the Very Elderly Trial ICD : International Classification of Diseases IMT : intima-media thickness INVEST : International Verapamil SR/Trandolapril JTF : Joint Task Force LDL : low-density lipoprotein Lp(a) : lipoprotein(a) LpPLA2 : lipoprotein-associated phospholipase 2 LVH : left ventricular hypertrophy MATCH : Management of Atherothrombosis with Clopidogrel in High-risk Patients with Recent Transient Ischaemic Attack or Ischaemic Stroke MDRD : Modification of Diet in Renal Disease MET : metabolic equivalent MONICA : Multinational MONItoring of trends and determinants in CArdiovascular disease NICE : National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence NRT : nicotine replacement therapy NSTEMI : non-ST elevation myocardial infarction ONTARGET : Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and in combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial OSA : obstructive sleep apnoea PAD : peripheral artery disease PCI : percutaneous coronary intervention PROactive : Prospective Pioglitazone Clinical Trial in Macrovascular Events PWV : pulse wave velocity QOF : Quality and Outcomes Framework RCT : randomized clinical trial RR : relative risk SBP : systolic blood pressure SCORE : Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation Project SEARCH : Study of the Effectiveness of Additional Reductions in Cholesterol and SHEP : Systolic Hypertension in the Elderly Program STEMI : ST-elevation myocardial infarction SU.FOL.OM3 : SUpplementation with FOlate, vitamin B6 and B12 and/or OMega-3 fatty acids Syst-Eur : Systolic Hypertension in Europe TNT : Treating to New Targets UKPDS : United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study VADT : Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial VALUE : Valsartan Antihypertensive Long-term Use VITATOPS : VITAmins TO Prevent Stroke VLDL : very low-density lipoprotein WHO : World Health Organization ### 1.1 Introduction Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a chronic disorder developing insidiously throughout life and usually progressing to an advanced stage by the time symptoms occur. It remains the major cause of premature death in Europe, even though CVD mortality has …

6,913 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is of great importance that guidelines and recommendations are presented in formats that are easily interpreted, and their implementation programmes must also be well conducted.
Abstract: Guidelines aim to present all the relevant evidence on a particular issue in order to help physicians to weigh the benefits and risks of a particular diagnostic or therapeutic procedure. They should be helpful in everyday clinical decision-making. A great number of guidelines have been issued in recent years by different organizations-European Society of Cardiology (ESC), American Heart Association (AHA), American College of Cardiology (ACC), and other related societies. By means of links to web sites of National Societies several hundred guidelines are available. This profusion can put at stake the authority and validity of guidelines, which can only be guaranteed if they have been developed by an unquestionable decision-making process. This is one of the reasons why the ESC and others have issued recommendations for formulating and issuing guidelines. In spite of the fact that standards for issuing good quality guidelines are well defined, recent surveys of guidelines published in peer-reviewed journals between 1985 and 1998 have shown that methodological standards were not complied with in the vast majority of cases. It is therefore of great importance that guidelines and recommendations are presented in formats that are easily interpreted. Subsequently, their implementation programmes must also be well conducted. Attempts have been made to determine whether guidelines improve the quality of clinical practice and the utilization of health resources. In addition, the legal implications of medical guidelines have been discussed and examined, resulting in position documents, which have been published by a specific Task Force. The ESC Committee for Practice Guidelines (CPG) supervises and coordinates the preparation of new Guidelines and Expert Consensus Documents produced by Task Forces, expert groups or consensus panels. The Committee is also responsible for the endorsement of these guidelines or statements. The rationale for an active approach to the prevention of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) is …

2,099 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This scientific statement, an update of the previously published American Heart Association (AHA) document, highlights the major clinical and research applications of functional capacity assessment.
Abstract: The assessment of functional capacity reflects the ability to perform activities of daily living that require sustained aerobic metabolism. The integrated efforts and health of the pulmonary, cardiovascular, and skeletal muscle systems dictate an individual’s functional capacity. Numerous investigations have demonstrated that the assessment of functional capacity provides important diagnostic and prognostic information in a wide variety of clinical and research settings. This scientific statement, an update of the previously published American Heart Association (AHA) document,1 highlights the major clinical and research applications of functional capacity assessment. For a comprehensive review of exercise testing, the reader is referred to the American College of Cardiology (ACC)/AHA Guidelines for Exercise Testing.2,3 Functional capacity is the ability of an individual to perform aerobic work as defined by the maximal oxygen uptake (Vo2max), that is, the product of cardiac output and arteriovenous oxygen (a−Vo2) difference at physical exhaustion, as shown in the following equation: ![Formula][1] Where HR indicates heart rate and SV indicates stroke volume. Because Vo2max typically is achieved by exercise that involves only about half of the total body musculature, it is generally believed that Vo2max is limited by maximal cardiac output rather than peripheral factors.4 Although Vo2max is measured in liters of oxygen per minute, it usually is expressed in milliliters of oxygen per kilogram of body weight per minute to facilitate intersubject comparisons. In addition, functional capacity, particularly when estimated from the work rate achieved rather than directly measured Vo, is frequently expressed in metabolic equivalents (METs), with 1 MET representing the resting energy expenditure (≈3.5 mL O2 · kg−1 · min−1). In this instance, functional capacity is commonly expressed clinically as a multiple of the resting metabolic rate. Vo2max … [1]: /embed/graphic-1.gif

584 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The focus of this 36th Bethesda Conference is the trained athlete with an identified cardiovascular abnormality and prudent consensus recommendations regarding the eligibility of such individuals for competition in organized sports.
Abstract: The focus of this 36th Bethesda Conference is the trained athlete with an identified cardiovascular abnormality. The goal is to formally develop prudent consensus recommendations regarding the eligibility of such individuals for competition in organized sports, and to present these considerations in

464 citations