scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Journal ArticleDOI

Plant Regeneration from Pea Leaflets Cultured in vitro and Genetic Stability of Regenerants.

01 Dec 1984-Journal of Plant Physiology (Urban & Fischer)-Vol. 117, Iss: 2, pp 119-130
TL;DR: Analysis of four isozymes, esterase, GDH, 6-PGD, and LAP, as well as nine genetically defined morphological characters indicated retention of genetic stability in the progeny of tisssue culture propagules.
About: This article is published in Journal of Plant Physiology.The article was published on 1984-12-01. It has received 67 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Cytokinin & Shoot.
Citations
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A reproducible transformation system was developed for pea using as explants sections from the embryonic axis of immature seeds, and transformed plants were resistant to the herbicide Basta when sprayed at rates used in field practice.
Abstract: A reproducible transformation system was developed for pea (Pisum sativum L.) using as explants sections from the embryonic axis of immature seeds. A construct containing two chimeric genes, nopaline synthase-phosphinothricin acetyl transferase (bar) and cauliflower mosaic virus 35S-neomycin phosphotransferase (nptII), was introduced into two pea cultivars using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation procedures. Regeneration was via organogenesis, and transformed plants were selected on medium containing 15 mg/L of phosphinothricin. Transgenic peas were raised in the glasshouse to produce flowers and viable seeds. The bar and nptII genes were expressed in both the primary transgenic pea plants and in the next generation progeny, in which they showed a typical 3:1 Mendelian inheritance pattern. Transformation of regenerated plants was confirmed by assays for neomycin phosphotransferase and phosphinothricin acetyl transferase activity and by northern blot analyses. Transformed plants were resistant to the herbicide Basta when sprayed at rates used in field practice.

253 citations

Book
11 Dec 2000
TL;DR: Chemistry nutrition plant physiology, agronomy processing biotechnology breeding strategies for improving grain legume carbohydrates, and research into breeding strategies to improve grain legumes carbohydrates are presented.
Abstract: Chemistry nutrition plant physiology and agronomy processing biotechnology breeding strategies for improving grain legume carbohydrates. (Part contents).

110 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Levels of regeneration were increased by having abaxial rather than adaxial surface in contact with the regeneration medium, although this effect was dependent on the presence of 0.1 or 1.0 mM putrescine but not the DNA methylation inhibitor 5-azacytidine.

105 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Whole plant regeneration via somatic embryogenesis was obtained in pea using explants from immature embryos or shoot apex segments and plantlets obtained from both zygotic embryos and shoot apices were transferred to soil and were grown to maturity.
Abstract: Whole plant regeneration via somatic embryogenesis was obtained in pea (Pisum sativum L.) using explants from immature embryos or shoot apex segments. The induction of somatic embryos required picloram or 2,4-D. Germination of fully-developed embryos was accomplished by subculture on medium with only cytokinin and then on medium supplemented with cytokinins in combination with a reduced auxin concentration. Plantlets obtained from both zygotic embryos and shoot apices were transferred to soil and were grown to maturity. Nine plants were examined cytologically, revealing three tetraploids (2n=4x=28) and six diploids (2n=2x=14).

86 citations


Cites background from "Plant Regeneration from Pea Leaflet..."

  • ...…and Kartha, 1984, for a review; Devreux, 1970; Gamborg et al., 1974; Atanassov and Mehandjiev, 1979; Malmberg, 1979; Mroginski and Kartha, 1981; Rubluo et al., 1984; Hussey and Gunn, 1984; Kunakh et al., 1984; and Ezhova et al., 1985), but plant regeneration via i__nn yitro embryogenesis has…...

    [...]

  • ...Genotypic effects for growth in vitro and regeneration ability have been reported in pea (Malmberg, 1979; Jacobsen et al., 1980; Rubluo et al., 1984; Hussey and Gunn, 1984; Ezhova et al., 1985; Kysely, 1985)....

    [...]

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 1993
TL;DR: This chapter reviews studies to identify the sources of resistance and genes involved for controlling the resistance of peas, and describes germplasm resources and reproductive biology of peas.
Abstract: Publisher Summary Pea, Pisum sativum L. (2n = 2x = 14), belongs to the family Leguminosae (Fabaceae) and is a very widely grown and popular vegetable crop. It is a rich source of protein, amino acids, and carbohydrate. Peas are used alone and also mixed with other vegetables. Peas are processed for freezing, canning, and dehydration in the immature stage. Central Asia, the Near East, Ethiopia, and the Mediterranean areas are the centers of origin of pea. Pea is an annual herbaceous plant with racemose inflorescences arising from the leaf axils; it is single to multiple podded, and the pods have 5 to 10 seeds. There are six species of peas: (1) Pisum sativum (garden pea), (2) P. elatius (Mediterranean pea), (3) P. arvense (field pea), (4) P. abyssinicum (Abyssinian pea), (5) P. humile (dwarf pea), and (6) P. fulvum (red yellow pea). All forms have 2n = 2x = 14 and cross to each other with few sterility barriers. All known peas have 14 somatic chromosomes and 7 as the haploid number. Pea is a classic genetic material; thus, a great deal of work on cytology, genetics, and improvement has been conducted. This chapter reviews these studies. Pea crops are highly susceptible to several fungal, bacterial, and viral diseases. Attempts have been made to identify the sources of resistance and genes involved for controlling the resistance. A major breeding objective is the development of varieties resistant to the existing disease in particular areas. Peas are sensitive to frost and therefore, another objective is to develop frost-resistant varieties. Peas are grown for fresh consumption and also for processing purposes especially canning, freezing, and dehydration. Therefore, in several breeding programs, development of processing of varieties of peas is a major objective. The chapter also describes germplasm resources and reproductive biology of peas.

80 citations

References
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In vivo redox biosensing resolves the spatiotemporal dynamics of compartmental responses to local ROS generation and provide a basis for understanding how compartment-specific redox dynamics may operate in retrograde signaling and stress 67 acclimation in plants.
Abstract: In experiments with tobacco tissue cultured on White's modified medium (basal meditmi hi Tnhles 1 and 2) supplemenk'd with kiticthi and hidoleacctic acid, a slrikin^' fourlo (ive-told intTease iu yield was ohtaitu-d within a three to Tour week j^rowth period on addition of an aqtteotis exlrarl of tobacco leaves (Fi^'ures 1 and 2). Subse(iueutly it was found Ihiit this jnoniotiou oi' f^rowih was due mainly though nol entirely to inorj^auic rather than organic con.stitttenls in the extract. In the isolation of Rrowth factors from plant tissues and other sources inorj '̂anic salts are fre(|uently carried along with fhe organic fraclioits. When tissue cultures are used for bioassays, therefore, il is necessary lo lake into account increases in growth which may result from nutrient elements or other known constituents of the medium which may he present in the te.st materials. To minimize interference trom rontaminaitis of this type, an altempt has heen made to de\\eh)p a nieditmi with such adequate supplies of all re(iuired tnineral nutrients and cotntnott orgattic cottslitueitls that no apprecial»le change in growth rate or yield will result from the inlroduclion of additional amounts in the range ordinarily expected to be present in tnaterials to be assayed. As a point of referetice for this work some of the culture media in mc)st common current use will he cotisidered briefly. For ease of comparis4)n Iheir mineral compositions are listed in Tables 1 and 2. White's nutrient .solution, designed originally for excised root cultures, was based on Uspeuski and Uspetiskaia's medium for algae and Trelease and Trelease's micronutrieni solution. This medium also was employed successfully in the original cttltivation of callus from the tobacco Iiybrid Nicotiana gtauca x A', tanijadorffii, atitl as further modified by White in 194̂ ^ and by others it has been used for the

63,098 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The technique of disc electrophoresis has been presented, including a discussion of the technical variables with special reference to the separation of protein fractions of normal human serum.
Abstract: Summary The technique of disc electrophoresis has been presented, including a discussion of the technical variables with special reference to the separation of protein fractions of normal human serum.

17,771 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The nutrient requirements of suspension cultures from soybean root have been investigated, and a simple medium consisting of mineral salts, sucrose, vitamins and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2, 4- d) has been designed.

9,342 citations