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Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1021/ACS.NANOLETT.1C00168

Platelet-Membrane-Coated Nanoparticles Enable Vascular Disrupting Agent Combining Anti-Angiogenic Drug for Improved Tumor Vessel Impairment.

02 Mar 2021-Nano Letters (American Chemical Society)-Vol. 21, Iss: 6, pp 2588-2595
Abstract: Compared with traditional chemotherapeutics, vascular disruption agents (VDAs) have the advantages of rapidly blocking the supply of nutrients and starving tumors to death. Although the VDAs are effective under certain scenarios, this treatment triggers angiogenesis in the later stage of therapy that frequently leads to tumor recurrence and treatment failure. Additionally, the nonspecific tumor targeting and considerable side effects also impede the clinical applications of VDAs. Here we develop a customized strategy that combines a VDA with an anti-angiogenic drug (AAD) using mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) coated with platelet membrane for the self-assembled tumor targeting accumulation. The tailor-made nanoparticles accumulate in tumor tissues through the targeted adhesion of platelet membrane surface to damaged vessel sites, resulting in significant vascular disruption and efficient anti-angiogenesis in animal models. This study demonstrates the promising potential of combining VDA and AAD in a single nanoplatform for tumor eradication.

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7 results found


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1021/ACS.NANOLETT.1C00818
Cailing Chen, Meiyu Song, Yangyang Du, Ying Yu  +5 moreInstitutions (1)
16 Jun 2021-Nano Letters
Abstract: Cell-membrane-coated nanoparticles have emerged as a promising antitumor therapeutic strategy. However, the immunologic mechanism remains elusive, and there are still crucial issues to be addressed including tumor-homing capacity, immune incompatibility, and immunogenicity. Here, we reported a tumor-associated macrophage membrane (TAMM) derived from the primary tumor with unique antigen-homing affinity capacity and immune compatibility. TAMM could deplete the CSF1 secreted by tumor cells in the tumor microenvironment (TME), blocking the interaction between TAM and cancer cells. Especially, after coating TAMM to upconversion nanoparticle with conjugated photosensitizer (NPR@TAMM), NPR@TAMM-mediated photodynamic immunotherapy switched the activation of macrophages from an immunosuppressive M2-like phenotype to a more inflammatory M1-like state, induced immunogenic cell death, and consequently enhanced the antitumor immunity efficiency via activation of antigen-presenting cells to stimulate the production of tumor-specific effector T cells in metastatic tumors. This TAM-membrane-based photodynamic immunotherapy approach offers a new strategy for personalized tumor therapy.

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Topics: Tumor microenvironment (57%), Immunogenic cell death (56%), Immunotherapy (55%) ... read more

5 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1039/D1NR02880D
Wei Xiong1, Lin Qi1, Deli Si2, Xin Jiang1  +9 moreInstitutions (3)
12 Aug 2021-Nanoscale
Abstract: Background: Currently, limited tumor drug permeation, poor oxygen perfusion and immunosuppressive microenvironments are the most important bottlenecks that significantly reduce the efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT). The main cause of these major bottlenecks is the platelet activation maintained abnormal tumor vessel barriers. Thus, platelet inhibition may present a new way to most effectively enhance the efficacy of PDT. However, to the best of our knowledge, few studies have validated the effectiveness of such a way in enhancing the efficacy of PDT both in vivo and in vitro. In this study, perfluoro-N-(4-methylcyclohexyl) piperidine-loaded albumin (PMP@Alb) nanoparticles were discovered, which possess excellent platelet inhibition ability. After PMP@Alb treatment, remarkably enhanced intra-tumoral drug accumulation, oxygen perfusion and T cell infiltration could be observed owing to the disrupted tumor vessel barriers. Besides, the effect of ICG@Lip mediated PDT was significantly amplified by PMP@Alb nanoparticles. It was demonstrated that PMP@Alb could be used as a useful tool to improve the efficacy of existing PDT by disrupting tumor vessel barriers through effective platelet inhibition.

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1 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1021/ACS.NANOLETT.1C02782
Weidong Ni1, Jiayan Wu2, Huapan Fang2, Yuanji Feng2  +5 moreInstitutions (2)
22 Sep 2021-Nano Letters
Abstract: Immunotherapy holds great promise for patients undergoing tumor treatment. However, the clinical effect of immunotherapy is limited because of tumor immunogenicity and its immunosuppressive microenvironment. Herein, the metal-organic framework (MIL-100) loaded with chemotherapeutic agent mitoxantrone (MTO) was combined with photothermal-chemotherapy for enhancing immunogenic cell death. MIL-100 loaded with MTO and hyaluronic acid as nanoparticles (MMH NPs) yielded an NP with two therapeutic properties (photothermal and chemotherapy) with dual imaging modes (photoacoustic and thermal). When MMH NPs were coinjected with an anti-OX40 antibody in colorectal cancer, the highest antitumor efficacy and a robust immune effect were achieved. This work provides a novel combined therapeutic strategy, which will hold great promise in future tumor therapy.

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1 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.ADDR.2021.113974
Jing Wang1, Motao Zhu2, Guangjun Nie2, Guangjun Nie1Institutions (2)
Abstract: The translational success of liposomes in chemotherapeutics has already demonstrated the great potential of biomembrane-based nanostructure in effective drug delivery. Meanwhile, increasing efforts are being dedicated to the application of naturally derived lipid membranes, including cellular membranes and extracellular vesicles in anti-cancer therapies. While synthetic liposomes support superior multifunctional flexibility, natural biomembrane materials possess interesting biomimetic properties and can also be further engineered for intelligent design. Despite being remarkably different from each other in production and composition, the phospholipid bilayer structure in common allows liposomes, cell membrane-derived nanomaterials, and extracellular vesicles to be modified, functionalized, and exploited in many similar manners against challenges posed by tumor-targeted drug delivery. This review will summarize the recent advancements in engineering the membrane-derived nanostructures with "intelligent" modules to respond, regulate, and target tumor cells and the microenvironment to fight against malignancy. We will also discuss perspectives of combining engineered functionalities with naturally occurring activity for enhanced cancer therapy.

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Topics: Drug delivery (51%)

Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.3390/PHARMACEUTICS13111887
07 Nov 2021-Pharmaceutics
Abstract: The biomedical field is currently reaping the benefits of research on biomimetic nanoparticles (NPs), which are synthetic nanoparticles fabricated with natural cellular materials for nature-inspired biomedical applications. These camouflage NPs are capable of retaining not only the physiochemical properties of synthetic nanoparticles but also the original biological functions of the cellular materials. Accordingly, NPs coated with cell-derived membrane components have achieved remarkable growth as prospective biomedical materials. Particularly, bacterial outer membrane vesicle (OMV), which is a cell membrane coating material for NPs, is regarded as an important molecule that can be employed in several biomedical applications, including immune response activation, cancer therapeutics, and treatment for bacterial infections with photothermal activity. The currently available cell membrane-coated NPs are summarized in this review. Furthermore, the general features of bacterial OMVs and several multifunctional NPs that could serve as inner core materials in the coating strategy are presented, and several methods that can be used to prepare OMV-coated NPs (OMV-NPs) and their characterization are highlighted. Finally, some perspectives of OMV-NPs in various biomedical applications for future potential breakthrough are discussed. This in-depth review, which includes potential challenges, will encourage researchers to fabricate innovative and improvised, new-generation biomimetic materials through future biomedical applications.

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References
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35 results found


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1038/NRC1187
Gregg L. Semenza1Institutions (1)
Abstract: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) activates the transcription of genes that are involved in crucial aspects of cancer biology, including angiogenesis, cell survival, glucose metabolism and invasion. Intratumoral hypoxia and genetic alterations can lead to HIF-1alpha overexpression, which has been associated with increased patient mortality in several cancer types. In preclinical studies, inhibition of HIF-1 activity has marked effects on tumour growth. Efforts are underway to identify inhibitors of HIF-1 and to test their efficacy as anticancer therapeutics.

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Topics: HIF1A (60%), Hypoxia-inducible factors (56%), Angiogenesis (52%) ... read more

5,551 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/0092-8674(94)90200-3
21 Oct 1994-Cell
Abstract: The phenomenon of inhibition of tumor growth by tumor mass has been repeatedly studied, but without elucidation of a satisfactory mechanism. In our animal model, a primary tumor inhibits its remote metastases. After tumor removal, metastases neovascularize and grow. When the primary tumor is present, metastatic growth is suppressed by a circulating angiogenesis inhibitor. Serum and urine from tumor-bearing mice, but not from controls, specifically inhibit endothelial cell proliferation. The activity copurifies with a 38 kDa plasminogen fragment that we have sequenced and named angiostatin. A corresponding fragment of human plasminogen has similar activity. Systemic administration of angiostatin, but not intact plasminogen, potently blocks neovascularization and growth of metastases. We here show that the inhibition of metastases by a primary mouse tumor is mediated, at least in part, by angiostatin.

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Topics: Angiostatin binding (75%), Angiostatin (67%), Endostatin (60%) ... read more

3,459 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1038/NRC.2016.108
Abstract: The intrinsic limits of conventional cancer therapies prompted the development and application of various nanotechnologies for more effective and safer cancer treatment, herein referred to as cancer nanomedicine. Considerable technological success has been achieved in this field, but the main obstacles to nanomedicine becoming a new paradigm in cancer therapy stem from the complexities and heterogeneity of tumour biology, an incomplete understanding of nano-bio interactions and the challenges regarding chemistry, manufacturing and controls required for clinical translation and commercialization. This Review highlights the progress, challenges and opportunities in cancer nanomedicine and discusses novel engineering approaches that capitalize on our growing understanding of tumour biology and nano-bio interactions to develop more effective nanotherapeutics for cancer patients.

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2,699 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1038/NATURE04483
Napoleone Ferrara1, Robert S. Kerbel2Institutions (2)
15 Dec 2005-Nature
Abstract: Inhibiting angiogenesis is a promising strategy for treatment of cancer and several other disorders, including age-related macular degeneration. Major progress towards a treatment has been achieved over the past few years, and the first antiangiogenic agents have been recently approved for use in several countries. Therapeutic angiogenesis (promoting new vessel growth to treat ischaemic disorders) is an exciting frontier of cardiovascular medicine, but further understanding of the mechanisms of vascular morphogenesis is needed first.

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Topics: Therapeutic angiogenesis (61%), Angiogenesis (51%)

2,430 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1021/NN800072T
Monty Liong1, Jie Lu, Michael Kovochich, Tian Xia  +4 moreInstitutions (1)
01 May 2008-ACS Nano
Abstract: Drug delivery, magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging, magnetic manipulation, and cell targeting are simultaneously possible using a multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticle. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals were encapsulated inside mesostructured silica spheres that were labeled with fluorescent dye molecules and coated with hydrophilic groups to prevent aggregation. Water-insoluble anticancer drugs were delivered into human cancer cells; surface conjugation with cancer-specific targeting agents increased the uptake into cancer cells relative to that in non-cancerous fibroblasts. The highly versatile multifunctional nanoparticles could potentially be used for simultaneous imaging and therapeutic applications.

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Topics: Mesoporous silica (55%), Drug delivery (54%)

1,612 Citations