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Journal ArticleDOI

Police corruption and police reform: The Fitzgerald inquiry in Queensland, Australia

Mark Finnane1
01 Sep 1990-Policing & Society (Taylor & Francis Group)-Vol. 1, Iss: 2, pp 159-171
TL;DR: The 1989 Fitzgerald Report in Queensland, Australia was one of the country's most farreaching investigations of police corruption and maladministration as discussed by the authors, and its recommendations, including measures to reorganize the police force and establish new modes of review of the criminal justice system, are made against a background of police reform in other States, including New South Wales and Victoria.
Abstract: The 1989 Fitzgerald Report in Queensland, Australia was one of the country's most far‐reaching investigations of police corruption and maladministration. Its recommendations, including measures to reorganize the police force and establish new modes of review of the criminal justice system, are made against a background of police reform in other States, including New South Wales and Victoria. The paper reviews the Report's findings in the context of the historical development of policing in Australia, centralized, marked by strong police unionism and with periodic crises of corruption and maladministration over the past century. The prospects for police reform are reviewed.
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01 Jan 1999
TL;DR: The Policing and Reducing Crime Unit (PRC Unit) was formed in 1998 as a result of the merger of the Police Research Group (PRG) and the Research and Statistics Directorate.
Abstract: The Policing and Reducing Crime Unit (PRC Unit) was formed in 1998 as a result of the merger of the Police Research Group (PRG) and the Research and Statistics Directorate. The PRC Unit is now one part of the Research, Development and Statistics Directorate of the Home Office. The PRC Unit carries out and commissions research in the social and management sciences on policing and crime reduction, broadening the role that PRG played. The PRC Unit has now combined PRG's two main series into the Police R e s e a rch Series, containing PRG's earlier work. This series will present re s e a rc h material on crime prevention and detection as well as police management and o rganisation issues. Research commissioned by PRG will appear as a PRC Unit publication. Throughout the text there may be references to PRG and these now need to be understood as relating to the PRC Unit.. Copies of this publication can be made available in formats accessible to the visually impaired on request. (ii) C Forewor d T h roughout the 1960's and 1970's discussion of the Police Service and policing in the United Kingdom was punctuated with examples of malpractice and misconduct. Twenty years on, several high profile scandals involving officers at all ranks of the police service in a number of forces, have again placed the police s e rvice, and discussion of police corruption in part i c u l a r, under the official and public spotlight. The Police Service has taken an active and leading role in tackling police corruption and in putting in place strategies to detect, investigate and eliminate corruption within its ranks. The Association of Chief Police Officers Taskforce on Corruption, established in September 1998, has taken the lead at a national level; individual forces, most notably the Metropolitan Police Service are putting in place preventive strategies more robust than those previously introduced in the United Kingdom; and, Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary has completed a Thematic Inspection on Integrity within the Police Service. This publication contributes to the debate by providing a review of the published English language literature on corruption. By its very nature a literature review is historical. It is hoped that in identifying key lessons drawn from the experiences of police organisations in various jurisdictions, this report will inform the very substantial work now underway in the Police Service. …

120 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors propose a working definition of police corruption in the context of African Security Review: Vol. 7, No. 1, 1998, pp. 3-14.
Abstract: (1998). Police Corruption: Towards a Working Definition. African Security Review: Vol. 7, No. 1, pp. 3-14.

57 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Tim Prenzler1
TL;DR: In this paper, a case study of the Queensland Police Service and the Queensland Criminal Justice Commission (CJC) is used to examine the issue of capture in detail using an Australian case study, and the question of capture is assessed by analysing reports on significant issues involving the CJC and police.
Abstract: Many jurisdictions have created external oversight bodies for police following problems of recurring misconduct and the failure of internal control mechanisms. Questions inevitably follow about the effectiveness of the new bodies to detect and prevent abuses of power. One potential source of ineffectiveness is undue influence or 'capture' by police. This paper reviews developments in external oversight internationally and examines the issue of capture in detail using an Australian case study of the Queensland Police Service and the Queensland Criminal Justice Commission (CJC). The question of capture was assessed by analysing reports on significant issues involving the CJC and police. Cases of zealous enforcement of rules were apparent, but the study identified a generally weak approach on the part of the Commission to enforcement and direction. Crucial elements of the CJC's structure and functions have exposed it to capture; including a role in facilitating police management, joint operations against organized crime, and reliance on seconded police investigators. The available evidence did not confirm a case of direct capture, but there was evidence from audits of investigations that police involvement in investigations and discipline contributed to a marked attrition of complaints. Weakness in oversight could also be related to the combined effects of an appeasement strategy, an overly legalistic organizational culture, and inadequate quality control. Practical measures are recommended to improve accountability that have general application to police oversight bodies. These include a clearer separation between police and the regulator, quality assessment measures, and exclusion of a facilitation role to allow the regulator to focus on police conduct.

56 citations


Cites background from "Police corruption and police reform..."

  • ...The report has been a focal point for subsequent inquiries in other jurisdictions, and has also received attention as an important case study in the international literature (Finnane 1991; Goldsmith 1991)....

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  • ...The preceding section referred to the significance of the Queensland Fitzgerald Inquiry (1989) as the first inquiry in Australia to expose high-level corruption and initiate large-scale reform measures....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Inside and outside the boundary of police corruption: Inside and Outside the Boundaries of Police Corruption as discussed by the authors, a survey of corruption in African Security Review: Vol. 7, No. 2, pp. 3-21.
Abstract: (1998). Inside and Outside the Boundaries of Police Corruption. African Security Review: Vol. 7, No. 2, pp. 3-21.

37 citations

References
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