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Power, politics and religion in Timurid Iran

01 Jan 2007-
TL;DR: In this paper, Forbes Manz uses the history of Iran under the Timurid ruler Shahrukh (1409-1447) to analyse the relationship between government and society in the medieval Middle East.
Abstract: Beatrice Forbes Manz uses the history of Iran under the Timurid ruler Shahrukh (1409–1447) to analyse the relationship between government and society in the medieval Middle East. She provides a rich portrait of Iranian society over an exceptionally broad spectrum - the dynasty and its servitors, city elite and provincial rulers, and the religious classes, both ulama' and Sufi. The work addresses two issues central to pre-modern Middle Eastern history: how a government without the monopoly of force controlled a heterogeneous society, and how a society with diffuse power structures remained stable over long periods. Written for an audience of students as well as scholars, this book provides a broad analysis of political dynamics in late medieval Iran and challenges much received wisdom about civil and military power, the relationship of government to society, and the interaction of religious figures with the ruling class.

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Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Temur's army of conquest: the Ulus Chaghatay as mentioned in this paper is a famous example of such an army. But it is not a complete account of the history of the army.
Abstract: List of maps Acknowledgements A note on usage and transcription 1. Introduction 2. The Ulus Chaghatay in the mid-fourteenth century 3. Temur's rise to power: the politics of the Ulus Chaghatay 4. Temur's army of conquest: the Ulus Chaghatay 5. Temur's army of conquest: outsiders and conquered peoples 6. Structure and function in Temur's administration 7. The struggle for succession 8. Conclusion Appendices Notes Bibliography Index.

90 citations

Book
24 Dec 2009
TL;DR: A comparative study of the politics, religion, and culture of the Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal Empires between 1300 and 1923 is presented in this article, focusing on Islam and how it impacted on the political and military structures, economy, language, literature, and religious traditions of these great empires.
Abstract: Between 1453 and 1526 Muslims founded three major states in the Mediterranean, Iran and South Asia: respectively the Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal empires By the early seventeenth century their descendants controlled territories that encompassed much of the Muslim world, stretching from the Balkans and North Africa to the Bay of Bengal and including a combined population of between 130 and 160 million people This book is the first comparative study of the politics, religion, and culture of these three empires between 1300 and 1923 At the heart of the analysis is Islam, and how it impacted on the political and military structures, the economy, language, literature and religious traditions of these great empires This original and sophisticated study provides an antidote to the modern view of Muslim societies by illustrating the complexity, humanity and vitality of these empires, empires that cannot be reduced simply to religious doctrine

71 citations

Book
26 May 2016
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors focus on the works and intellectual network of the Timurid historian Sharaf al Dín 'Alī Yazdī (d.1454) and present a holistic view of intellectual life in fifteenth century Iran.
Abstract: By focusing on the works and intellectual network of the Timurid historian Sharaf al Dīn 'Alī Yazdī (d.1454), this book presents a holistic view of intellectual life in fifteenth century Iran. Ilker Evrim Binbas argues that the intellectuals in this period formed informal networks which transcended political and linguistic boundaries, and spanned an area from the western fringes of the Ottoman State to bustling late medieval metropolises such as Cairo, Shiraz, and Samarkand. The network included an Ottoman revolutionary, a Mamluk prophet, and a Timurid occultist, as well as physicians, astronomers, devotees of the secret sciences, and those political figures who believed that the network was a force to be taken seriously. Also discussing the formation of an early modern Islamicate republic of letters, this book offers fresh insights on the study of intellectual history beyond the limitations imposed by nationalist methodologies, established genres, and recognized literary traditions.

48 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2010

47 citations


Cites background from "Power, politics and religion in Tim..."

  • ...And, Roger Savory, "The Consolidation of Safawid Power in Persia," Islam 41 (1965)....

    [...]

  • ...And, Roger Savory, "The Consolidation of Safawid Power in Persia," Islam 41 (1965). The...

    [...]

  • ...34 Aziz Ahmad, "Safawid Poets and India," Iran xiv (1976); Abolghasem Dadvar, Iranians in Mughal Politics and Society, 1606-1658 (New Delhi: Gyan Pub....

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Book
Guy Burak1
12 Jan 2015
TL;DR: The Second Formation of Islamic Law as mentioned in this paper explores how the Ottoman dynasty shaped the structure and doctrine of a particular branch within the Hanafi school of law and examines the opposition of various jurists, mostly from the empire's Arab provinces, to this development.
Abstract: The Second Formation of Islamic Law is the first book to deal with the rise of an official school of law in the post-Mongol period. The author explores how the Ottoman dynasty shaped the structure and doctrine of a particular branch within the Hanafi school of law. In addition, the book examines the opposition of various jurists, mostly from the empire's Arab provinces, to this development. By looking at the emergence of the concept of an official school of law, the book seeks to call into question the grand narratives of Islamic legal history that tend to see the nineteenth century as the major rupture. Instead, an argument is formed that some of the supposedly nineteenth-century developments, such as the codification of Islamic law, are rooted in much earlier centuries. In so doing, the book offers a new periodization of Islamic legal history in the eastern Islamic lands.

40 citations

References
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Book
18 Feb 1991
TL;DR: A distillation of the late Albert Hourani's lifetime of scholarship, it was a bestseller when first published in 1991 as mentioned in this paper, and includes such recent events as the ongoing crisis in Iraq, the civil war in Algeria and the aftermath of September 11th.
Abstract: This text covers not only political history, but also culture, society, economy and thought. A distillation of the late Albert Hourani's lifetime of scholarship, it was a bestseller when first published in 1991. This edition includes such recent events as the ongoing crisis in Iraq, the civil war in Algeria and the aftermath of September 11th.

560 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

543 citations

Book
01 Jan 1988
TL;DR: Lapidus' history explores the beginnings and transformations of Islamic civilizations in the Middle East and details Islam's worldwide diffusion as mentioned in this paper, which is a comprehensive account of pre-Islamic late antiquity; the beginnings of Islam; the early Islamic empires; and Islamic religious, artistic, legal and intellectual cultures.
Abstract: This new edition of one of the most widely used course books on Islamic civilizations around the world has been substantially revised to incorporate the new scholarship and insights of the last twenty-five years. Ira Lapidus' history explores the beginnings and transformations of Islamic civilizations in the Middle East and details Islam's worldwide diffusion. The history is divided into four parts. Part I is a comprehensive account of pre-Islamic late antiquity; the beginnings of Islam; the early Islamic empires; and Islamic religious, artistic, legal and intellectual cultures. Part II deals with the construction in the Middle East of Islamic religious communities and states to the fifteenth century. Part III includes the history to the nineteenth century of Islamic North Africa and Spain; the Ottoman, Safavid and Mughal empires; and other Islamic societies in Asia and Africa. Part IV accounts for the impact of European commercial and imperial domination on Islamic societies and traces the development of the modern national state system and the simultaneous Islamic revival from the early nineteenth century to the present.

494 citations