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Predicted and experimental steady and unsteady transonic flows about a biconvex airfoil

L. L. Levy1
01 Feb 1981-
TL;DR: The results of computer code time dependent solutions of the two dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations and the results of independent experiments are compared to verify the Mach number range for instabilities in the transonic flow field about a 14 percent thick biconvex airfoil at an angle of attack of 0 deg and a Reynolds number of 7 million.
Abstract: Results of computer code time dependent solutions of the two dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations and the results of independent experiments are compared to verify the Mach number range for instabilities in the transonic flow field about a 14 percent thick biconvex airfoil at an angle of attack of 0 deg and a Reynolds number of 7 million. The experiments were conducted in a transonic, slotted wall wind tunnel. The computer code included an algebraic eddy viscosity turbulence model developed for steady flows, and all computations were made using free flight boundary conditions. All of the features documented experimentally for both steady and unsteady flows were predicted qualitatively; even with the above simplifications, the predictions were, on the whole, in good quantitative agreement with experiment. In particular, predicted time histories of shock wave position, surface pressures, lift, and pitching moment were found to be in very good agreement with experiment for an unsteady flow. Depending upon the free stream Mach number for steady flows, the surface pressure downstream of the shock wave or the shock wave location was not well predicted.

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Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the existence and uniqueness of the Navier-Stokes equations have not been proven although it is known that in certain cases only the most stable solution is obtained.
Abstract: It is known that the nonlinear Navier-Stokes equations will model most fluid flow of aeronautical interest. The existence and uniqueness of the solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations have not been proven although it is known that in certain cases only the most stable solution is obtained. This present work is concerned with identifying multiple solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for transonic flow. The objective is to exploit the existence of these solutions rather than avoid them as has been the custom in the past. The present work has shown that the cause of multiple solutions in potential flow is a bifurcation of solutions at a specific Mach number distribution; airfoils could be designed to give such a distribution. It is also found that the presence of entropy and vorticity does not affect the occurrence of phantom solutions. A physical example of a phantom solution is explained by a study of the potential phantom solutions.

4 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
06 Jan 1997
TL;DR: The Applied Computational Engineering Research Group (ACERG) at The Queens University of Belfast has recently carried out a detailed numerical investigation, studying the ability of two "in-house" Navier-Stokes codes to accurately predict and control periodic flow over rigid airfoils.
Abstract: The Applied Computational Engineering Research Group (ACERG) at The Queens University of Belfast has recently carried out a detailed numerical investigation, studying the ability of two "in-house" Navier-Stokes codes to accurately predict and control periodic flow over rigid airfoils. Firstly, an explicit cellvertex-centred full-mass averaged Navier-Stokes code MGENS2D is employed in conjunction with a hyperbolic C-grid generator. Results are then compared with ACERG's 2-D implicit thin-layer Navier-Stokes code NAVIER operating over an identical hyperbolic Cgrid. Turbulence closure is accomplished in both cases using a modified version of the zero equation algebraic Baldwin-Lomax model. In the transonic flow regime both codes accurately predict the shock induced oscillation onset boundary and reduced frequencies for an 18% thick circular-arc airfoil. In addition the explicit code also reproduces the experimentally detected hysteresis region: only by employing the full massaveraged Navier-Stokes equations, operating on a suitably fine grid, can the dynamic shear layers be adequately resolved. Three control methodologies for this flow regime are successfully investigated, namely: passive control, heat transfer and varying length trailingedge splitter plates. In the low-speed high angle-ofattack periodic flow regime MGENS2D accurately reproduces the periodic leading-edge vortex shedding which was experimentally detected for a NACA0012 airfoil. Using Darcy's Law to simulate a 65% chord * Lecturer and Director of CFD Research, ACERG, Department of Aeronautical Engineering, Member AIAA. ** Lecturer and Director of FEA Research, ACERG, Department of Aeronautical Engineering, Member AIAA * Head of Department, Department of Aeronautical Engineering, Member AIAA. § PostGraduate Research Student, Department of Aeronautical Engineering. Copyright © 1997 by Mark A. Gillan. Published by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics , Inc with permission. upper surface porous region, the code demonstrates the ability of passive control to suppress periodic vortex shedding and therefore alleviate buffet. Finally, suction control applied in the vicinity of 1-10% chord of the airfoil's upper surface is also shown to eliminate buffet.

3 citations

01 Feb 1975
TL;DR: In this article, the time-splitting explicit numerical method of MacCormack is applied to separated turbulent boundary layer flow problems, and numerical solutions of high-Reynolds-number separated flows over an airfoil and shock-separated flows over a flat plate are obtained.
Abstract: The time-splitting explicit numerical method of MacCormack is applied to separated turbulent boundary layer flow problems. Modifications of this basic method are developed to counter difficulties associated with complicated geometry and severe numerical resolution requirements of turbulence model equations. The accuracy of solutions is investigated by comparison with exact solutions for several simple cases. Procedures are developed for modifying the basic method to improve the accuracy. Numerical solutions of high-Reynolds-number separated flows over an airfoil and shock-separated flows over a flat plate are obtained. A simple mixing length model of turbulence is used for the transonic flow past an airfoil. A nonorthogonal mesh of arbitrary configuration facilitates the description of the flow field. For the simpler geometry associated with the flat plate, a rectangular mesh is used, and solutions are obtained based on a two-equation differential model of turbulence.

2 citations

01 Jan 1981
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors discuss the state of the art of this technology and suggest possible future areas of research and discuss some of the flow conditions for which the Navier-Stokes equations appear to be required.
Abstract: During the past five years, numerous pioneering archival publications have appeared that have presented computer solutions of the mass-weighted, time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for transonic problems pertinent to the aircraft industry. These solutions have been pathfinders of developments that could evolve into a major new technological capability, namely the computational Navier-Stokes technology, for the aircraft industry. So far these simulations have demonstrated that computational techniques, and computer capabilities have advanced to the point where it is possible to solve forms of the Navier-Stokes equations for transonic research problems. At present there are two major shortcomings of the technology: limited computer speed and memory, and difficulties in turbulence modelling and in computation of complex three-dimensional geometries. These limitations and difficulties are the pacing items of the continuing developments, although the one item that will most likely turn out to be the most crucial to the progress of this technology is turbulence modelling. The objective of this presentation is to discuss the state of the art of this technology and suggest possible future areas of research. We now discuss some of the flow conditions for which the Navier-Stokes equations appear to be required. On an airfoil there are four different types of interaction of a shock wave with a boundary layer: (1) shock-boundary-layer interaction with no separation, (2) shock-induced turbulent separation with immediate reattachment (we refer to this as a shock-induced separation bubble), (3) shock-induced turbulent separation without reattachment, and (4) shock-induced separation bubble with trailing edge separation.
References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, an experimental and theoretical study of transonic flow over a thick airfoil, prompted by a need for adequately documented experiments that could provide rigorous verification of viscous flow simulation computer codes, is reported.
Abstract: An experimental and theoretical study of transonic flow over a thick airfoil, prompted by a need for adequately documented experiments that could provide rigorous verification of viscous flow simulation computer codes, is reported. Special attention is given to the shock-induced separation phenomenon in the turbulent regime. Measurements presented include surface pressures, streamline and flow separation patterns, and shadowgraphs. For a limited range of free-stream Mach numbers the airfoil flow field is found to be unsteady. Dynamic pressure measurements and high-speed shadowgraph movies were taken to investigate this phenomenon. Comparisons of experimentally determined and numerically simulated steady flows using a new viscous-turbulent code are also included. The comparisons show the importance of including an accurate turbulence model. When the shock-boundary layer interaction is weak the turbulence model employed appears adequate, but when the interaction is strong, and extensive regions of separation are present, the model is inadequate and needs further development.

189 citations


"Predicted and experimental steady a..." refers background in this paper

  • ...i-or a constant angle of Attack and Reynolds number, and at progressively higher froe-stream Mach number-,, tiles flow field about the airfoil can be (1) steady, j with trailing-edge boundary-layer separation, (2) unsteady, with aerodynamically self-excited periodic oscillations in shock-wave location and intensity and in the location of boundiry-laver separation, or (3) can be steady with shock-induced separation....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, an experimental and computational investigation of the steady and unsteady transonic flowfields about a thick airfoil is described, and an operational computer code for solving the two-dimensional, compressible NavierStokes equations for flow over airfoils was modified to include solid-wall, slip-flow boundary conditions to properly assess the code and help guide the development of improved turbulence models.
Abstract: An experimental and computational investigation of the steady and unsteady transonic flowfields about a thick airfoil is described. An operational computer code for solving the two-dimensional, compressible NavierStokes equations for flow over airfoils was modified to include solid-wall, slip-flow boundary conditions to properly assess the code and help guide the development of improved turbulence models. Steady and unsteady fiowfieids about an 18% thick circular arc airfoil at Mach numbers of 0.720, 0.754, and 0.783 and a chord Reynolds number of 11 x 10 are predicted and compared with experiment. Results from comparisons with experimental pressure and skin-friction distributions show improved agreement when including test-section wall boundaries in the computations. Steady-flow results were in good quantitative agreement with experimental data for flow conditions which result in relatively small regions of separated flow. For flows with larger regions of separated flow, improvements in turbulence modeling are required before good agreement with experiment will be obtained. For the first time, computed results for unsteady turbulent flows with separation caused by a shock wave were obtained which qualitatively reproduce the time-dependent aspects of experiments. Features such as the intensity and reduced frequency of airfoil surface-pressure fluctuations, oscillatory regions of trailing-edge and shock-induced separation, and the Mach number range for unsteady flows were all qualitatively reproduced.

152 citations

01 Jul 1976
TL;DR: In this article, a new numerical method used to drastically reduce the computation time required to solve the Navier-Stokes equations at flight Reynolds numbers is described, which makes it possible and practical to calculate many important three-dimensional, high Reynolds number flow fields on computers.
Abstract: A new numerical method used to drastically reduce the computation time required to solve the Navier-Stokes equations at flight Reynolds numbers is described. The new method makes it possible and practical to calculate many important three-dimensional, high Reynolds number flow fields on computers.

93 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, four different algebraic eddy viscoisity models are tested for viability to achieve turbulence closure for the class of flows considered, ranging from an unmodified boundary-layer mixing-length model to a relaxation model incorporating special considerations for the separation bubble region.
Abstract: The two-dimensional Reynolds averaged compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved using MacCormack's second-order accurate explicit finite difference method to simulate the separated transonic tur- bulent flowfield over an airfoil. Four different algebraic eddy viscoisity models are tested for viability to achieve turbulence closure for the class of flows considered. These models range from an unmodified boundary-layer mixing-length model to a relaxation model incorporating special considerations for the separation bubble region. Results of this study indicate the necessity for special attention to the separated flow region and suggest limits of applicability of algebraic turbulence models to these separated flowfield. each of these studies the time-dependent Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations for two-dimensional compressive flow are used and tur- bulence closure is achieved by means of model equations for the Reynolds stresses. Wilcox1'2 used a first-order accurate numerical scheme and the two equation differential tur- bulence model of Saffman 12 to simulate the supersonic shock boundary-layer interaction experiment of Reda and Mur- phy 13 and the compression corner flow of Law.14 Good quan- titative agreement with the Reda and Murphy data was ob- tained, but only the qualitative features of the compression corner flow were well simulated. Using a more sophisticated second-order accurate numerical scheme, Baldwin3'4 con- sidered both the two equation differential model of Saffman and a simpler algebraic mixing-length model to simulate the hypersonic shock boundary-layer interaction experiment of Holden.15 He found the more elaborate model of Saffman to yield somewhat better results than the algebraic model, but at the cost of considerably more computing time. Good quan- titative agreement with experiment was not obtained with either model. Following Baldwin's approach all subsequent investigations have been performed using the more rigorous second-order accurate numerical scheme of Mac- Cormack.17'18 Deiwert5'6'11 considered an algebraic mixing- length model to simulate the transonic airfoil experiment of McDevitt et al. 16 while Horstman et al. 8 used a similar ap- proach to simulate their hypersonic shock boundary-layer ex- periment on an axisymmetric cylinder. In each of these studies, while qualitative features of the flows were described well, good quantitative agreement with experiment in the in- teraction regions was not obtained. Using a relaxing turbulence model Shang and Hankey7 simulated the compression corner flow of Law, and Baldwin and Rose10 simulated the flat plate flow of Reda and Murphy. In each of these studies the relaxing model was found to per- form significantly better than the simpler algebraic model and, according to Shang and Hankey, provided significantly better comparisons with measurements than were obtained by Wilcox using the two equation differential model of Saffman. In each of these studies it was essential that the full Navier- Stokes equations be considered to describe the viscous- inviscid interaction and the elliptic nature of separating-

90 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, an explicit finite-difference method with time splitting is used to solve the time-dependent equations for compressible turbulent flow, and a nonorthogonal computational mesh of arbitrary configuration facilitates the description of the flow field.
Abstract: A code has been developed for simulating high Reynolds number transonic flow fields of arbitrary configuration. An explicit finite-difference method with time splitting is used to solve the time-dependent equations for compressible turbulent flow. A nonorthogonal computational mesh of arbitrary configuration facilitates the description of the flow field. The code is applied to simulate the flow over an 18 percent thick circular-arc biconvex airfoil at zero angle of attack and free-stream Mach number of 0.775. A simple mixing-length model is used to describe the turbulence and chord Reynolds numbers of 1, 2, 4, and 10 million are considered. The solution describes in sufficient detail both the shock-induced and trailing-edge separation regions, and provides the profile and friction drag.

81 citations