scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Journal ArticleDOI

Preventing Summer Reading Declines in Children Who Are Disadvantaged

01 Oct 2003-Journal of Early Intervention (SAGE Publications)-Vol. 26, Iss: 1, pp 47-58
TL;DR: The authors found that during summer vacation, children who are disadvantaged often experience declines in reading achievement, while children from middle and high-income backgrounds improve reading achievement during the summer vacation period.
Abstract: During summer vacation, children who are disadvantaged often experience declines in reading achievement, while children from middle- and high-income backgrounds improve. In this study, an experimen...
Citations
More filters
01 Jan 1969
TL;DR: Two speakers describe various methods to encourage creativity in the music classroom, also providing examples of creative activities that can be provided to students.
Abstract: Two speakers describe various methods to encourage creativity in the music classroom, also providing examples of creative activities that can be provided to students. The major contribution of an imaginative, skilled and trained music teacher in developing creativity in the classroom is highlighted.

371 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors investigated the leisure reading habits of urban minority middle school students and found that celebrities, celebrities, people or characters like me, sports figures, and musicians were among the most popular subjects pursued in respondents' leisure reading.
Abstract: Research indicates that there is a strong relationship between leisure reading and school achievement, but the leisure reading habits of urban adolescents have rarely been studied. From their investigation of the leisure reading habits of 584 urban minority middle school students, the authors identify these key findings: •More than two-thirds of the students indicated that they read for fun and relaxation, to learn new things, or because they were bored. •Magazines were the preferred reading material for both males and females, followed by comics and the Internet. •Celebrities, “people or characters like me,” sports figures, and musicians were among the most popular subjects pursued in respondents' leisure reading. •Reading during summer vacation was not popular with either sex. Based on these findings, the authors provide eight recommendations for teachers and librarians to keep in mind as they strive to support the literacy development of urban adolescents.

199 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors compared the use of two supple-mental balanced and strategic reading interventions that targeted the decoding, fluency, and reading comprehension of upper- elementary and middle school students with reading disabilities.
Abstract: In this study we compared the use of two supple- mental balanced and strategic reading interventions that targeted the decoding, fluency, and reading comprehension of upper- elementary and middle school students with reading disabilities (RD). All students had significant delays in decoding, fluency, comprehension, and language processing. Two comparable, inten- sive tutorial treatments differed only in the degree of explicitness of the comprehension strategy instruction. Overall, there was meaningful progress in students' reading decoding, fluency, and comprehension. Gains in formal measures of word attack and reading fluency after five weeks of intervention translated into grade-equivalent gains of approximately half a school year. Analysis of the trends in the daily informal fluency probes trans- lated into a weekly gain of 1.28 correct words per minute. The more explicit comprehension strategy instruction was more effec- tive than the less explicit treatment. Findings are discussed in light of the question of how to maximize the effects of reading interventions for older children with RD.

142 citations


Cites background from "Preventing Summer Reading Declines ..."

  • ...…an ethical issue (Lyon & Moats, 1997), and we believed that participants in the PDF/GR intervention would benefit from the treatment, while students in a no-control treatment group likely would regress in their reading skills over the summer (Allington & McGill-Franzen, 2003; Schacter, 2003)....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a longitudinal randomised trial, a randomly assigned group of exiting First-Grade children who were economically disadvantaged was enrolled in a seven-week summer reading day camp.
Abstract: During the summer vacation children who are economically disadvantaged experience declines in reading achievement, while middle- and high-income children improve. Previous research has demonstrated that the most widely implemented intervention – sending economically disadvantaged students to summer school – has not led to increases in reading achievement. In this longitudinal randomised trial, a randomly assigned group of exiting First-Grade children who were economically disadvantaged was enrolled in a seven-week summer reading day camp. The intervention students' reading achievement was then compared to control group participants at four time points. Results showed noteworthy differences for intervention students in reading comprehension.

88 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The present study assessed the effects of summer parent tutoring on 3 children with learning disabilities using empirically derived reading interventions that promote generalization and maintenance of treatment effects and demonstrated generalized increases in reading fluency in both high-word-overlap and low- word- overlap passages.
Abstract: The present study assessed the effects of summer parent tutoring on 3 children with learning disabilities using empirically derived reading interventions. Brief experimental analyses were used to identify customized reading fluency interventions. Parents were trained to use the intervention strategies with their children. Parents implemented the procedures during parent-tutoring sessions at home and results were measured continuously in high-word-overlap and low-word-overlap passages to determine whether generalization occurred. Parent and child satisfaction with the procedures was assessed. Results demonstrated generalized increases in reading fluency in both high-word-overlap and low-word-overlap passages as a function of parent tutoring. Also, acceptability ratings by children and their parents indicated that they viewed the interventions as acceptable and effective. Results are discussed in terms of structuring reading fluency interventions that promote generalization and maintenance of treatment effects.

74 citations


Cites background from "Preventing Summer Reading Declines ..."

  • ...Given the decreases in academic performance experienced by school-aged children during the summer months (Cooper, Nye, & Charlton, 1996; Schacter, 2003), especially in low-income families (Alexander et al., 2001; Cooper et al.)...

    [...]

  • ...Summer has been correlated with a significant decrease in reading performance (Schacter, 2003)....

    [...]

References
More filters
Book
01 Dec 1969
TL;DR: The concepts of power analysis are discussed in this paper, where Chi-square Tests for Goodness of Fit and Contingency Tables, t-Test for Means, and Sign Test are used.
Abstract: Contents: Prefaces. The Concepts of Power Analysis. The t-Test for Means. The Significance of a Product Moment rs (subscript s). Differences Between Correlation Coefficients. The Test That a Proportion is .50 and the Sign Test. Differences Between Proportions. Chi-Square Tests for Goodness of Fit and Contingency Tables. The Analysis of Variance and Covariance. Multiple Regression and Correlation Analysis. Set Correlation and Multivariate Methods. Some Issues in Power Analysis. Computational Procedures.

115,069 citations

Book
01 Jan 1998
TL;DR: This chapter discusses strategies for helping children with Reading Difficulties in Grades 1 to 3, as well as recommendations for practice and research.
Abstract: 1 Front Matter 2 Executive Summary 3 Part I: Introduction to Reading 4 1. Introduction 5 2. The Process of Learning to Read 6 Part II: Who Are We Talking About? 7 3. Who Has Reading Difficulties? 8 4. Predictors of Success and Failure in Reading 9 Part III: Prevention and Intervention 10 5. Preventing Reading Difficulties Before Kindergarten 11 6. Instructional Strategies for Kindergarten and the Primary Grades 12 7. Organizational Strategies for Kindergarten and the Primary Grades 13 8. Helping Children with Reading Difficulties in Grades 1 to 3 14 Part IV: Knowledge into Action 15 9. The Agents of Change 16 10. Recommendations for Practice and Research 17 References 18 Biographical Sketches 19 Index

5,743 citations

01 Jan 2000
TL;DR: An Evidence-Based Assessment of the Scientific Research Literature on Reading and its Implications for Reading Instruction Table of Table 1.1 as discussed by the authors, and Table 2.1...
Abstract: TEACHING CHILDREN TO READ: An Evidence-Based Assessment of the Scientific Research Literature on Reading and Its Implications for Reading Instruction Table of

5,111 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: The authors disentangles the separate factors influencing achievement with special attention given to the role of teacher differences and other aspects of schools, and estimates educational production functions based on models of achievement growth with individual fixed effects.
Abstract: Considerable controversy surrounds the impact of schools and teachers on the achievement of students. This paper disentangles the separate factors influencing achievement with special attention given to the role of teacher differences and other aspects of schools. Unique matched panel data from the Harvard/UTD Texas Schools Project permit distinguishing between total effects and the impact of specific, measured components of teachers and schools. While schools are seen to have powerful effects on achievement differences, these effects appear to derive most importantly from variations in teacher quality. A lower bound suggests that variations in teacher quality account for at least 7« percent of the total variation in student achievement, and there are reasons to believe that the true percentage is considerably larger. The subsequent analysis estimates educational production functions based on models of achievement growth with individual fixed effects. It identifies a few systematic factors a negative impact of initial years of teaching and a positive effect of smaller class sizes for low income children in earlier grades but these effects are very small relative to the effects of overall teacher quality differences.

3,882 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examined the development of literacy in one elementary school with a large minority, low socioeconomic status population, followed as they progressed from first through fourth grade, finding that good readers read considerably more than the poor readers both in and out of school, which appeared to contribute to the good readers' growth in some reading and writing skills.
Abstract: My research focused on literacy development in children through fourth grade and followed an earlier study (Juel, Griffith, & Gough, 1986). The Simple View of reading and writing received support in this earlier study and was examined in my current research. Of particular concern were these questions: Do the same children remain poor readers year after year? Do the same children remain poor writers year after year? What skills do the poor readers lack? What skills do the poor writers lack? What factors seem to keep poor readers from improving? What factors seem to keep poor writers from improving? The probability that a child would remain a poor reader at the end of fourth grade if the child was a poor reader at the end of first grade was .88. Early writing skill did not predict later writing skill as well as early reading ability predicted later reading ability. Children who became poor readers entered first grade with little phonemic awareness. By the end of fourth grade, the poor readers had still not achieved the level of decoding skill that the good readers had achieved at the beginning of second grade. Good readers read considerably more than the poor readers both in and out of school, which appeared to contribute to the good readers' growth in some reading and writing skills (e.g., in ideas for stories). Poor readers tended to become poor writers. The Simple View received support in accounting for reading and writing development through fourth grade. This study examined the development of literacy in one elementary school with a large minority, low socioeconomic status population. The reading and writing development of 54 children was followed as they progressed from first through fourth grade. This in-depth examination of literacy acquisition in a microcosm of at-risk children attempted to answer the following questions: Do the same children remain poor readers year after year? Do the same children remain poor writers year after year? What skills do the poor readers lack?

2,040 citations


"Preventing Summer Reading Declines ..." refers background in this paper

  • ...a child who is a poor reader in first grade will be classified as a poor reader in the fourth grade if no intervention is provided (Juel, 1988)....

    [...]