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Book ChapterDOI

Private Public Reading: Readers in Digital Literature Installation

04 Oct 2013-pp 301-317
TL;DR: Patrick Leahy's chapter draws on theories of visual arts and film studies and research on modes of reading to develop a discussion of the genre of installed digital literature.
Abstract: Leahy's contribution was invited by the editors of this volume, which was conceived as part of an authoritative international series by Blackwell. The aim of the Companion is to extend discussion around the intersection between digital humanities and digital literature. It draws together essays on digitisation, digital archives, encoding languages, and digital poetics. Leahy's chapter draws on theories of visual arts (site specificity) and film studies (concrete cinema) and on his research on modes of reading (see Outputs 1 and 2) to develop a discussion of the genre of installed digital literature. Works by poets, visual artists, computer artists and filmmakers are brought into relation with some examples of works of digital literature intended to be experienced or engaged with spatially or in a particular site.
Citations
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Dissertation
01 Apr 2018

18 citations


Cites background from "Private Public Reading: Readers in ..."

  • ...Regarding the properties of text during reading, a reader’s experience of reading is not determined by the content of the text or the style, genre, or mode of writing so much as how that text has been received whether physically or socially by a reader (Leahy, 2013)....

    [...]

  • ...A reader’s experience of reading is determined by several factors, including how text is physically and socially received (Leahy, 2013)....

    [...]

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors use discourse to refer elastically to digitally born, transmitted, and/or received information that is mediated through the combination of database and XML-based technologies described below, while in its narrower sense discourse refers to language-based communication.
Abstract: 49 1. Suiting style to theme, I have used an incomplete,minimal set of XML tags to mark out the sections of this paper. 2. I use discourse in this essay to refer elastically to digitally born, transmitted, and/or received information that is mediated through the combination of databaseand XML-based technologies described below.While in its narrower sense discourse refers to language-based communication, the term is still apt in the age of multimedia.While a contemporary data streammay consist of digital image, video, or sound, for example, it is still discursive to the extent that its production, transmission, aggregation, and coordination—in a word, management—are increasingly controlled (in the database and XML system I outline) through such text-based standards as SVG and SMIL (XML-based standards applicable to multimedia). Transcendental Data: Toward a Cultural History and Aesthetics of the New Encoded Discourse

86 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Congress of the Book of Sand, by Norman Thomas di Giovanni (New York, 1977), p. 33; hereafter abbreviated “C” (“un Congreso del Mundo que representaria a todos los hombres de todas las naciones”) as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: 133 1. Jorge Luis Borges, “El Congreso,” El libro de arena (Madrid, 1995), p. 35; hereafter abbreviated “EC”; trans. under the title “The Congress,”The Book of Sand, by Norman Thomas di Giovanni (New York, 1977), p. 33; hereafter abbreviated “C” (“un Congreso del Mundo que representaria a todos los hombres de todas las naciones”). Languages, Books, and Reading from the Printed Word to the Digital Text

54 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors pointed out the ways in which death has tended to become obscene, meaningless, impersonal, an event either stupefyingly colossal in cases of large-scale war or genocide or clinically concealed behind the technology of the hospital and the techniques of the funeral home.
Abstract: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1985), p. 299: “Sociologists and psychologists, as well as literary and cultural historians, consistently demonstrate the ways in which death has tended to become obscene, meaningless, impersonal—an event either stupefyingly colossal in cases of large-scale war or genocide, or clinically concealed somewhere behind the technology of the hospital and the techniques of the funeral home.” It is the technology, of course, that is key: and this applies not just to the technologically obscured death of human bodies, but to the technologically assisted figural “death,” first of the author (Barthes, Foucault), then of the printed book (Birkerts et al.), and now of the techno-socialistic “network” (with military antecedents) that the Internet once was.

8 citations

01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors argue that interaction can be a form of depiction, causing the user to imagine both her perceptual actions and her manipulation of the work as being fictional as well as actual.
Abstract: This paper presents a method for analysing an aspect of interaction that can help us understand how users can feel that they are part of a work. I argue that interaction can be a form of depiction, causing the user to imagine both her perceptual actions and her manipulation of the work as being fictional as well as actual. This produces an ontological fusion between the actual and the fictional. In brief analyses of three interactive works, I suggest how this framework can enable a better understanding of some aspects of interactive art and literature.

3 citations