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Journal ArticleDOI

Professional ethics in midwifery practice

01 Aug 2010-The British Journal of Midwifery (MA Healthcare London)-Vol. 18, Iss: 8, pp 541-541
TL;DR: With the authors' professional backgrounds of midwifery, and one a professor of ethics, the reader can be assured the authors have the knowledge and expertise to write this book.
Abstract: With the authors' professional backgrounds of midwifery, and one a professor of ethics, the reader can be assured the authors have the knowledge and expertise to write this book.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The results suggest that women are using Complementary and Alternative Medicine in their pregnancy as a means of supporting their sense of self-determination, to pursue a natural and safe childbirth, and because they experience a close affiliation with the philosophical underpinnings of Complementaries and Alternative medicine as an alternative to the biomedical model.

29 citations


Cites background from "Professional ethics in midwifery pr..."

  • ...For example, the importance of and the right to selfdetermination for women is well documented in midwifery literature (Pairman et al., 2015; Fahy et al., 2008; Griffith et al., 2010; King et al., 2013; Foster and Lasser, 2011; Australian College of Midwives, 2016)....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Evaluating the effectiveness of a work-based module and in-service educational programme in perineal repair for midwives on their perceived level of competency undertaking this skill in clinical practice provided greater insight into the complex nature of workplace learning.

21 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe the overall labour and birth experience of partners within the context of an intrapartum transfer occurring from a low risk midwifery-led, woman-centred unit to an obstetric unit.

17 citations

Dissertation
01 Nov 2016
TL;DR: The findings show that pregnant women do not identify with being ‘obese’ and perceive themselves as being overweight but healthy, and changes that need to be made to positively enhance how these women experience pregnancy and childbirth are identified.
Abstract: The current position of the World Health Organisation (WHO, 2014) is that there is a threat of a global “obesity epidemic” (Boero, 2007, p.1); and existing studies in the UK report that a 5th of pregnant women are overweight. This has created increased scrutiny of fatness and weight, especially in pregnant women. The concern about obesity and pregnancy outcomes also contributes to the National Institute for Health Care Excellence (NICE, 2010), recommending that the antenatal care delivered to overweight pregnant women should be within the guidelines of a high-risk pathway of antenatal care. This has increased the medicalisation of the care for overweight pregnant women. The aim of this study is to explore the experiences of overweight pregnant women in relation to their heightened medicalised antenatal care. Using a social constructionist approach and a Foucauldian interpretive lens, semi-structured face-to-face interviews were used to collect data from 12 women who were between 16 and 30 weeks pregnant, 6 midwives who provide antenatal care for them, and 3 obstetricians to whom women are referred. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. The findings show that pregnant women do not identify with being ‘obese’ and perceive themselves as being overweight but healthy. Key themes that emerged from the data describing women’s perception of heightened antenatal care are: their understanding of risk and risk perception, the power of science and how it constructs their maternal health and the power of obstetricians justifying medical interventions in pregnancy and childbirth. This study creates and contributes to the awareness of how overweight pregnant women who are healthy experience antenatal care. It explores the need of overweight pregnant women, and identifies changes that need to be made to positively enhance how these women experience pregnancy and childbirth. These findings need to be considered by policy makers, individuals in practice and those with a role in educating health care practitioners so that overweight pregnant women are provided the appropriate antenatal care.

14 citations


Cites background from "Professional ethics in midwifery pr..."

  • ...Midwives used these attributes of femininity in their interaction with women by being good and active listeners which encourages women to express themselves in the way they deem fit (Foster and Lasser, 2010)....

    [...]

  • ...First time mothers on the other hand, also acted in line with the Theory of Choice (Scott, 2000) and Foucault’s (1997) concept of knowledge and power, but the impact of their lack of knowledge in exercising human exchange relationships about their choice of birth place is very evident in their post choice reactions where they bemoaned themselves for not doing enough to manage their weight and so had to subjugate their desire for a choice of birthplace....

    [...]

References
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The results suggest that women are using Complementary and Alternative Medicine in their pregnancy as a means of supporting their sense of self-determination, to pursue a natural and safe childbirth, and because they experience a close affiliation with the philosophical underpinnings of Complementaries and Alternative medicine as an alternative to the biomedical model.

29 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Evaluating the effectiveness of a work-based module and in-service educational programme in perineal repair for midwives on their perceived level of competency undertaking this skill in clinical practice provided greater insight into the complex nature of workplace learning.

21 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe the overall labour and birth experience of partners within the context of an intrapartum transfer occurring from a low risk midwifery-led, woman-centred unit to an obstetric unit.

17 citations

Dissertation
01 Nov 2016
TL;DR: The findings show that pregnant women do not identify with being ‘obese’ and perceive themselves as being overweight but healthy, and changes that need to be made to positively enhance how these women experience pregnancy and childbirth are identified.
Abstract: The current position of the World Health Organisation (WHO, 2014) is that there is a threat of a global “obesity epidemic” (Boero, 2007, p.1); and existing studies in the UK report that a 5th of pregnant women are overweight. This has created increased scrutiny of fatness and weight, especially in pregnant women. The concern about obesity and pregnancy outcomes also contributes to the National Institute for Health Care Excellence (NICE, 2010), recommending that the antenatal care delivered to overweight pregnant women should be within the guidelines of a high-risk pathway of antenatal care. This has increased the medicalisation of the care for overweight pregnant women. The aim of this study is to explore the experiences of overweight pregnant women in relation to their heightened medicalised antenatal care. Using a social constructionist approach and a Foucauldian interpretive lens, semi-structured face-to-face interviews were used to collect data from 12 women who were between 16 and 30 weeks pregnant, 6 midwives who provide antenatal care for them, and 3 obstetricians to whom women are referred. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. The findings show that pregnant women do not identify with being ‘obese’ and perceive themselves as being overweight but healthy. Key themes that emerged from the data describing women’s perception of heightened antenatal care are: their understanding of risk and risk perception, the power of science and how it constructs their maternal health and the power of obstetricians justifying medical interventions in pregnancy and childbirth. This study creates and contributes to the awareness of how overweight pregnant women who are healthy experience antenatal care. It explores the need of overweight pregnant women, and identifies changes that need to be made to positively enhance how these women experience pregnancy and childbirth. These findings need to be considered by policy makers, individuals in practice and those with a role in educating health care practitioners so that overweight pregnant women are provided the appropriate antenatal care.

14 citations