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Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.IJID.2021.02.113

Prognostic performance of troponin in COVID-19: A diagnostic meta-analysis and meta-regression.

02 Mar 2021-International Journal of Infectious Diseases (Elsevier)-Vol. 105, pp 312-318
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Cardiac injury is frequently encountered in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and is associated with increased risk of mortality. Elevated troponin may signify myocardial damage and is predictive of mortality. This study aimed to assess the prognostic value of troponin above the 99th percentile upper reference limit (URL) for mortality, and factors affecting the relationship. METHODS: A comprehensive literature search of PubMed (MEDLINE), Scopus and Embase was undertaken, from inception of the databases until 16 December 2020. The key exposure was elevated serum troponin, defined as troponin (of any type) above the 99th percentile URL. The outcome was mortality due to any cause. RESULTS: In total, 12,262 patients from 13 studies were included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. The mortality rate was 23% (20-26%). Elevated troponin was observed in 31% (23-38%) of patients. Elevated troponin was associated with increased mortality [odds ratio (OR) 4.75, 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.07-5.53; P < 0.001; I2 = 19.9%]. Meta-regression showed that the association did not vary with age (P = 0.218), male gender (P = 0.707), hypertension (P = 0.182), diabetes (P = 0.906) or coronary artery disease (P = 0864). The association between elevated troponin and mortality had sensitivity of 0.55 (0.44-0.66), specificity of 0.80 (0.71-0.86), positive likelihood ratio of 2.7 (2.2-3.3), negative likelihood ratio of 0.56 (0.49-0.65), diagnosis odds ratio of 5 (4-5) and area under the curve of 0.73 (0.69-0.77). The probability of mortality was 45% in patients with elevated troponin and 14% in patients with non-elevated troponin. CONCLUSION: Elevated troponin was associated with mortality in patients with COVID-19 with 55% sensitivity and 80% specificity.

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Topics: Troponin (52%), Odds ratio (52%), Likelihood ratios in diagnostic testing (51%) ... show more
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8 results found


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.IJID.2021.05.016
Abstract: BACKGROUND: This study aimed to investigate whether the active prescription of low-dose aspirin during or prior to hospitalization affects mortality in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Aspirin is often prescribed for secondary prevention in patients with cardiovascular disease and other comorbidities that might increase mortality, and may therefore falsely demonstrate increased mortality. To reduce bias, only studies that performed an adjusted analysis were included in this review. METHODS: A systematic literature search of PubMed, Scopus, Embase and Clinicaltrials.gov was performed, from inception until 16 April 2021. The exposure was active prescription of low-dose aspirin during or prior to hospitalization. The primary outcome was mortality. The pooled adjusted effect estimate was reported as relative risk (RR). RESULTS: Six eligible studies were included in this meta-analysis, comprising 13,993 patients. The studies had low-to-moderate risk of bias based on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. The meta-analysis indicated that the use of low-dose aspirin was independently associated with reduced mortality {RR 0.46 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.35-0.61], P < 0.001; I2 = 36.2%}. Subgroup analysis on in-hospital low-dose aspirin administration also showed a significant reduction in mortality [RR 0.39 (95% CI 0.16-0.96), P < 0.001; I2 = 47.0%]. CONCLUSION: Use of low-dose aspirin is independently associated with reduced mortality in patients with COVID-19, with low certainty of evidence.

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Topics: Aspirin (53%), Relative risk (50%)

7 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.AMSU.2021.102594
Abstract: Background The body of evidence showed that there is a strong correlation between acute myocardial Injury and COVID-19 infection. However, the link between acute myocardial infection and COVID-19, the prevalence, reliability of diagnostic modalities, independent predictors, and clinical outcomes are still uncertain and a topic of debate. The current study was designed to determine the prevalence, determinants, and outcomes of acute myocardial injury based on a systematic review and meta-analysis the global published peer-reviewed works of literature. Methods A comprehensive search was conducted in PubMed/Medline; Science direct, CINHAL, and LILACS from December 2019 to May 2021. All observational studies reporting the prevalence of AMI were included while case reports and reviews were excluded. The data were extracted with two independent authors in a customized format. The methodological quality of included studies was evaluated using the Newcastle-Ottawa appraisal tool. Results A total of 397 articles were identified from different databases. Thirty-seven Articles with 21, 204 participants were included while seven studies were excluded. The meta-analysis revealed that the pooled prevalence of myocardial injury during the COVID-19 pandemic was 22.33 % (95 % CI: 17.86 to 26.81, 37). Conclusion Our meta-analysis showed that mortality among patients with an acute myocardial injury during COVID-19 was more than four times more likely as compared to those without AMI. This necessitates a mitigating strategy to prevent and manage before its clinical outcomes getting worse.

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Topics: Meta-analysis (53%), Meta-regression (50%)

2 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.3389/FCVM.2021.713560
Abstract: A close and intriguing relationship has been suggested between heart failure (HF) and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). First, COVID-19 pandemic represented a global public health emergency in the last year and had a catastrophic impact on health systems worldwide. Several studies showed a reduction in HF hospitalizations, ranging from 30 to 66% in different countries and leading to a subsequent increase in HF mortality. Second, pre-existing HF is a risk factor for a more severe clinical course of COVID-19 and an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality. Third, patients hospitalized for COVID-19 may develop both an acute decompensation of chronic HF and de-novo HF as a consequence of myocardial injury and cardiovascular (CV) complications. Myocardial injury occurred in at least 10% of unselected COVID-19 cases and up to 41% in critically ill patients or in those with concomitant CV comorbidities. Few cases of COVID-19-related acute myocarditis, presenting with severe reduction in the left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction and peculiar histopathological findings, were described. However, recent data suggested that COVID-19 may be associated with both systolic and diastolic LV dysfunction, with LV diastolic impairment, pulmonary hypertension, and right ventricular dysfunction representing the most frequent findings in echocardiographic studies. An overview of available data and the potential mechanisms behind myocardial injury, possibly leading to HF, will be presented in this review. Beyond the acute phase, HF as a possible long-term consequence of cardiac involvement in COVID-19 patients has been supposed and need to be investigated yet.

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Topics: Myocarditis (56%), Heart failure (56%), Ejection fraction (53%) ... show more

2 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.3390/JCM10122726
Renato de Falco1, Maria Vargas1, Daniela De Palma1, Marcella Savoia1  +6 moreInstitutions (1)
Abstract: Increased concentrations of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and high-sensitivity troponin I (HsTnI) in COVID-19 patients have already been reported. The aim of this study is to evaluate which of these common markers of cardiac disease is the most useful predictor of fatal outcome in COVID-19 patients. One hundred and seventy-four patients affected with COVID-19 were recruited, and markers of cardiac disease and the clinical history of the patients were collected at admission in the infectious disease unit or intensive care unit. NT-proBNP, BNP and HsTnI values were higher in in-hospital non-surviving patients. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis of NT-proBNP, BNP and HsTnI was performed, with NT-proBNP (AUC = 0.951) and HsTnI (AUC = 0.947) being better performers (p = 0.01) than BNP (AUC = 0.777). Logistic regression was performed assessing the relation of HsTnI and NT-proBNP to fatal outcome adjusting for age and gender, with only NT-proBNP being significant. The population was then divided into two groups, one with higher NT-proBNP values at admission than the cut-off resulted from the ROC curve (511 ng/L) and a second one with lower values. The Kaplan–Meier analysis showed an absence of fatal outcome in the group of patients with NT-proBNP values lower than the cut-off (p < 0.001). NT-proBNP proved to be the best prognostic tool for fatal outcome among markers of cardiac disease in COVID-19 patients.

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Topics: Natriuretic peptide (52%), Population (51%)

1 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.5114/AOMS/134211
Abstract: Introduction: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) may affect many organs and may be responsible for numerous complications including cardiovascular problems Methods: We analysed consecutive patients (n = 51) admitted to the cardiology department between 1st October 2020 and 31st January 2021 due to symptoms which might have reflected cardiovascular complications following COVID-19 We collected data concerning clinical characteristics, results of laboratory tests, echocardiography and 24-hour ambulatory ECG recording Results: The post-COVID-19 complications appeared 1–4 months after disease recovery Severe cardiovascular complications were observed in 27 5% of hospitalized patients In comparison to those with mild complications, patients with severe complications had significantly higher prevalence of diabetes (36 vs 8%;p = 0 01), decrease in ejection fraction (36% vs 0%, p < 0 001), higher resting heart rate at admission (85 vs 72 bpm;p < 0 001), and higher levels of C-reactive protein (p = 0 02) and troponin T (17 9 vs 4 2 pg/ml;p = 0 01) Dyspnoea and exercise intolerance were also more frequent in patients with severe complications Conclusions: Diabetes, elevated level of CRP and troponin, heart rate variability parameters and worsening of left ventricular ejection fraction are related to the severity of cardiovascular complications following COVID-19 infection [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Archives of Medical Science is the property of Termedia Publishing House and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use This abstract may be abridged No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract (Copyright applies to all Abstracts )

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Topics: Ejection fraction (50%)

1 Citations


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33 results found


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1001/JAMACARDIO.2020.0950
Shaobo Shi1, Mu Qin2, Bo Shen1, Yuli Cai1  +9 moreInstitutions (2)
25 Mar 2020-JAMA Cardiology
Abstract: Importance Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has resulted in considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide since December 2019. However, information on cardiac injury in patients affected by COVID-19 is limited. Objective To explore the association between cardiac injury and mortality in patients with COVID-19. Design, Setting, and Participants This cohort study was conducted from January 20, 2020, to February 10, 2020, in a single center at Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China; the final date of follow-up was February 15, 2020. All consecutive inpatients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 were included in this study. Main Outcomes and Measures Clinical laboratory, radiological, and treatment data were collected and analyzed. Outcomes of patients with and without cardiac injury were compared. The association between cardiac injury and mortality was analyzed. Results A total of 416 hospitalized patients with COVID-19 were included in the final analysis; the median age was 64 years (range, 21-95 years), and 211 (50.7%) were female. Common symptoms included fever (334 patients [80.3%]), cough (144 [34.6%]), and shortness of breath (117 [28.1%]). A total of 82 patients (19.7%) had cardiac injury, and compared with patients without cardiac injury, these patients were older (median [range] age, 74 [34-95] vs 60 [21-90] years;P Conclusions and Relevance Cardiac injury is a common condition among hospitalized patients with COVID-19 in Wuhan, China, and it is associated with higher risk of in-hospital mortality.

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Topics: Heart Injury (51%), Cohort study (50%)

2,412 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1183/13993003.00524-2020
Rong Hui Du, Li Rong Liang1, Cheng Qing Yang, Wen Wang1  +10 moreInstitutions (1)
Abstract: The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with the death of patients with COVID-19 pneumonia caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. All clinical and laboratory parameters were collected prospectively from a cohort of patients with COVID-19 pneumonia who were hospitalised to Wuhan Pulmonary Hospital (Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China) between 25 December 2019 and 7 February 2020. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was performed to investigate the relationship between each variable and the risk of death of COVID-19 pneumonia patients. In total, 179 patients with COVID-19 pneumonia (97 male and 82 female) were included in the present prospective study, of whom 21 died. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that age ≥65 years (OR 3.765, 95% CI 1.146‒17.394; p=0.023), pre-existing concurrent cardiovascular or cerebrovascular diseases (OR 2.464, 95% CI 0.755‒8.044; p=0.007), CD3+CD8+ T-cells ≤75 cells·μL−1 (OR 3.982, 95% CI 1.132‒14.006; p We identified four risk factors: age ≥65 years, pre-existing concurrent cardiovascular or cerebrovascular diseases, CD3+CD8+ T-cells ≤75 cells·μL−1 and cardiac troponin I ≥0.05 ng·mL−1. The latter two factors, especially, were predictors for mortality of COVID-19 pneumonia patients.

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Topics: Pneumonia (57%), Prospective cohort study (54%), Cohort (51%)

844 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1038/S41569-020-0413-9
Masataka Nishiga1, Dao Wen Wang2, Yaling Han, David B. Lewis3  +2 moreInstitutions (3)
Abstract: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by a strain of coronavirus known as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has become a global pandemic that has affected the lives of billions of individuals. Extensive studies have revealed that SARS-CoV-2 shares many biological features with SARS-CoV, the zoonotic virus that caused the 2002 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome, including the system of cell entry, which is triggered by binding of the viral spike protein to angiotensin-converting enzyme 2. Clinical studies have also reported an association between COVID-19 and cardiovascular disease. Pre-existing cardiovascular disease seems to be linked with worse outcomes and increased risk of death in patients with COVID-19, whereas COVID-19 itself can also induce myocardial injury, arrhythmia, acute coronary syndrome and venous thromboembolism. Potential drug-disease interactions affecting patients with COVID-19 and comorbid cardiovascular diseases are also becoming a serious concern. In this Review, we summarize the current understanding of COVID-19 from basic mechanisms to clinical perspectives, focusing on the interaction between COVID-19 and the cardiovascular system. By combining our knowledge of the biological features of the virus with clinical findings, we can improve our understanding of the potential mechanisms underlying COVID-19, paving the way towards the development of preventative and therapeutic solutions.

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Topics: Coronavirus (54%), Disease (53%)

454 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.DSX.2020.04.018
Abstract: BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is chronic conditions with devastating multi-systemic complication and may be associated with severe form of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis in order to investigate the association between DM and poor outcome in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. METHODS: Systematic literature search was performed from several electronic databases on subjects that assess DM and outcome in COVID-19 pneumonia. The outcome of interest was composite poor outcome, including mortality, severe COVID-19, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), need for intensive care unit (ICU) care, and disease progression. RESULTS: There were a total of 6452 patients from 30 studies. Meta-analysis showed that DM was associated with composite poor outcome (RR 2.38 [1.88, 3.03], p < 0.001; I2: 62%) and its subgroup which comprised of mortality (RR 2.12 [1.44, 3.11], p < 0.001; I2: 72%), severe COVID-19 (RR 2.45 [1.79, 3.35], p < 0.001; I2: 45%), ARDS (RR 4.64 [1.86, 11.58], p = 0.001; I2: 9%), and disease progression (RR 3.31 [1.08, 10.14], p = 0.04; I2: 0%). Meta-regression showed that the association with composite poor outcome was influenced by age (p = 0.003) and hypertension (p < 0.001). Subgroup analysis showed that the association was weaker in studies with median age ≥55 years-old (RR 1.92) compared to <55 years-old (RR 3.48), and in prevalence of hypertension ≥25% (RR 1.93) compared to <25% (RR 3.06). Subgroup analysis on median age <55 years-old and prevalence of hypertension <25% showed strong association (RR 3.33) CONCLUSION: DM was associated with mortality, severe COVID-19, ARDS, and disease progression in patients with COVID-19.

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Topics: Subgroup analysis (50%)

409 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.105.570762
Björn Zethelius1, Nina Johnston1, Per Venge1Institutions (1)
28 Feb 2006-Circulation
Abstract: Background— Cardiac troponin I (cTnI), a standard for detection of myocardial damage, has recently been reported to predict acute myocardial infarction or death in patients with unstable coronary heart disease (CHD). Cardiac TnI concentrations increase with age in subjects free from clinical signs of CHD, suggesting silent myocardial damage. We investigated the association between cTnI and future CHD and mortality in a community-based cohort of men. Methods and Results— A community-based study was conducted from August 1991 to May 1995 among 1203 men in Uppsala, Sweden, aged 70 years at baseline with a follow-up of up to 10.4 years with the use of registry data (National Board of Health and Welfare, Sweden). CHD was defined with the use of data taken from the Cause of Death Registry or from first-time hospitalization for CHD as recorded in the Hospital Discharge Registry. Cardiac TnI concentrations were measured blinded for outcome, in frozen baseline plasma samples, with the use of the AccuTnI from Beckm...

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Topics: Myocardial infarction (55%), Cohort study (53%), Cohort (52%) ... show more

285 Citations