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Journal ArticleDOI

Provide a framework for problem statement in the organization's research: an AHP, ISM, and MICMAC approach

TL;DR: In this article , the authors identify the components of problem statement in organizational research and modelling them, based on the level of importance of these indicators, a model is presented and it is determined what position each indicator is in terms of Degree of dependence and Influence rate.
Abstract: The aim is to provide a framework for statement organizational research problems. State the problem is the most important reason for the researcher to choose the subject. Although research has been done on the characteristics of expression of research problems, but in organizational research, no framework for expressing the problem has been provided. The method used in this research is grounded theory followed by the ISM-MICMAC approach for modelling. The findings of this study identify the components of problem statement in organizational research and modelling them. Due to the large number of indicators, first nine indicators of higher importance were identified, which had much more weight than other indicators. These indicators were then compared and prioritized again by other experts. Based on the level of importance of these indicators, a model is presented and it is determined what position each of these indicators is in terms of Degree of dependence and Influence rate. The researcher can easily use this information to provide an acceptable problem statement and the editors will have a good assessment tool.
References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) is introduced as a method of measurement with ratio scales and illustrated with two examples, and the axioms and some of the central theoretical underpinnings of the theory are discussed.

2,875 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Carl Moons and colleagues provide a checklist and background explanation for critically appraising and extracting data from systematic reviews of prognostic and diagnostic prediction modelling studies.
Abstract: Carl Moons and colleagues provide a checklist and background explanation for critically appraising and extracting data from systematic reviews of prognostic and diagnostic prediction modelling studies. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

954 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The goal of this review is to provide the novice researcher with a starting point in becoming a more informed consumer and producer of research in the form of a lexicon of terms and an analysis of the underlying constructs that apply to scholarly enquiry, regardless of the specific methods employed.
Abstract: Introduction The novice researcher, such as the graduate student, can be overwhelmed by the intricacies of the research methods employed in conducting a scholarly inquiry (Leedy & Ormrod, 2005). As both a consumer and producer of research, it is essential to have a firm grasp on just what is entailed in producing legitimate, valid results and conclusions. The very large and growing number of diverse research approaches in current practice exacerbates this problem (Mertler & Vannatta, 2001). The goal of this review is to provide the novice researcher with a starting point in becoming a more informed consumer and producer of research in the form of a lexicon of terms and an analysis of the underlying constructs that apply to scholarly enquiry, regardless of the specific methods employed. Scholarly research is, to a very great extent, characterized by the type of study conducted and, by extension, the specific methods employed in conducting that type of study (Creswell, 2005, p. 61). Novice researchers, however, often mistakenly think that, since studies are known by how they are conducted, the research process starts with deciding upon just what type of study to conduct. On the contrary, the type of study one conducts is based upon three related issues: the problem driving the study, the body of knowledge, and the nature of the data available to the researcher. As discussed elsewhere, scholarly research starts with the identification of a tightly focused, literature supported problem (Ellis & Levy, 2008). The research-worthy problem serves as the point of departure for the research. The nature of the research problem and the domain from which it is drawn serves as a limiting factor on the type of research that can be conducted. Nunamaker, Chen, and Purdin (1991) noted that "It is clear that some research domains are sufficiently narrow that they allow the use of only limited methodologies" (p. 91). The problem also serves as the guidance system for the study in that the research is, in essence, an attempt to, in some manner, develop at least a partial solution to the research problem. The best design cannot provide meaning to research and answer the question 'Why was the study conducted,' if there is not the anchor of a clearly identified research problem. The body of knowledge serves as the foundation upon which the study is built (Levy & Ellis, 2006). The literature also serves to channel the research, in that it indicates the type of study or studies that are appropriate based upon the nature of the problem driving the study. Likewise, the literature provides clear guidance on the specific methods to be followed in conducting a study of a given type. Although originality is of great value in scholarly work, it is usually not rewarded when applied to the research methods. Ignoring the wisdom contained in the existing body of knowledge can cause the novice researcher, at the least, a great deal of added work establishing the validity of the study. From an entirely practical perspective, the nature of the data available to the researcher serves as a final filter in determining the type of study to conduct. The type of data available should be considered a necessary, but certainly not sufficient, consideration for selecting research methods. The data should never supersede the necessity of a research-worthy problem serving as the anchor and the existing body of knowledge serving as the foundation for the research. The absence of the ability to gather the necessary data can, however, certainly make a study based upon research methods directly driven by a well-conceived problem and supported by current literature completely futile. Every solid research study must use data in order to validate the proposed theory. As a result, novice researchers should understand the centrality of access to data for their study success. Access to data refers to the ability of the researcher to actually collect the desired data for the study. …

300 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
23 Jun 2013
TL;DR: The author describes the development of a general, freely avai lable AHP Excel template, allowing for multiple inputs with individual and consolidated output for decision makers.
Abstract: Though the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) is univ ersal and powerful in its application, it is still simple enough to be implemented in a spreadsheet pr ogram like MS Excel. In this paper the author describes the development of a general, freely avai lable AHP Excel template, allowing for multiple inputs with individual and consolidated output for decision makers. After an explanation of the template’s structure, realization and limitations, it practical use is illustrated with actual exampl es. They range from the determination of weights for ke y p rformance indicators in business performance management, over the ranking of growth strategies f or a company, to the selection of leadership competencies for a leadership development program. Experiences and challenges in the implementation and application of AHP will be highl i ted. For the analysis of the group judgments within the projects, a new consensus indicator is i ntroduced. It is based on the concept of diversity using Shannon entropy. Partitioning into two indepe ndent components allows finding clusters of high consensus within groups of decision makers.

266 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: There is an extensive range of well established methodologies in the educational research literature of which a growing subset of them is beginning to be used in engineering education research as discussed by the authors, such as case study, grounded theory, ethnography, action research, Phenomenography, Discourse Analysis, and Narrative Analysis.
Abstract: Background Methodology refers to the theoretical arguments that researchers use in order to justify their research methods and design. There is an extensive range of well established methodologies in the educational research literature of which a growing subset is beginning to be used in engineering education research. Purpose A more explicit engagement with methodologies, particularly those that are only emerging in engineering education research, is important so that engineering education researchers can broaden the set of research questions they are able to address. Scope/Method Seven methodologies are outlined and for each an exemplar paper is analyzed in order to demonstrate the methodology in operation and to highlight its particular contribution. The methodologies are: Case Study, Grounded Theory, Ethnography, Action Research, Phenomenography, Discourse Analysis, and Narrative Analysis. It is noted that many of the exemplar papers use some of these methodologies in combination. Conclusion The exemplar papers show that collectively these methodologies might allow the research community to be able to better address questions around key engineering education challenges, such as students' responses to innovative pedagogies, diversity issues in engineering, and the changing requirements for engineering graduates in the twenty-first century.

265 citations

Trending Questions (3)
What is the problem statement?

The paper provides a framework for problem statement in organizational research using AHP, ISM, and MICMAC methods, aiming to assist researchers in expressing research problems effectively.

What is the definition of a problem statement in social research?

A problem statement in social research is crucial for selecting research topics. This paper proposes a framework using AHP, ISM, and MICMAC methods to model and prioritize organizational research problems.

What are the key elements of a well-crafted problem statement in research?

Key elements of a well-crafted problem statement in organizational research include identifying important indicators, prioritizing them, and determining their degree of dependence and influence rate using AHP, ISM, and MICMAC approaches.