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Psalms 51-100

19 Mar 1991-
TL;DR: The middle section of the Hebrew Psalter has long been regarded as an inspiring anthology of ancient religious poetry as discussed by the authors, and a careful reading of Psalms 51-100 will stimulate a deeper appreciation for this religious poetry while augmenting the value of personal Bible study.
Abstract: The middle section of the Hebrew Psalter has long been regarded as an inspiring anthology of ancient religious poetry. Within this part of the Sepher Tehillim or Book of Praises, are 11 of the 12 psalms of Asaph (73-83), one of Solomon's two (72), the sole offerings of Ethan (89) and Moses (90), and four of the songs ascribed to the sons of Korah-not to mention the many assigned to David. Dr. Marvin Tate's distinctive commentary traces all the biographical, historical, literary, and practical concepts of these middle psalms and demonstrates how the purpose of each one unfolds. Psalms 51-100, Volume 20 of the Word Biblical Commentary series, furnishes readers with a wealth of information: a thorough, up-to-date bibliography preceding each psalm the author's fresh translation of the Hebrew text Form/Structure/Setting notes which expand the translation extensive comments on the text explanations of the pertinent observations of the author Dr. Tate has also attempted to present various views of passages in which differences of opinion exist. This work, the middle commentary of Word Biblical Commentary's three-volume study of the Psalter, mirrors the opposing emotions so often evident in life: sorrow-joy, love-hate, and faith-fear. A careful reading of Psalms 51-100 will stimulate a deeper appreciation for this religious poetry while augmenting the value of personal Bible study.
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2017
TL;DR: The relationship between Romans 3:4 and Psalm 51:4 (Psalm 50:6 in the Septuagint) has long puzzled scholars as discussed by the authors, and many suggest that Paul's use of Ps 50: 6LXX either seems not to fit the logic of Romans 3 or does not reflect the psalmist's meaning.
Abstract: The relationship between Romans 3:4 and Psalm 51:4 (Psalm 50:6 in the Septuagint) has long puzzled scholars. Many suggest that Paul's use of Ps 50:6LXX either seems not to fit the logic of Romans 3 or does not reflect the psalmist's meaning. This article offers an interpretation of Romans 3:4 that eliminates the apparent tension between the two texts. It clarifies Paul's meaning in Romans 3 by reinterpreting Psalm 51:4 in its context. Both Psalm 51:4 and Romans 3:4 refer to God's saving righteousness. The conclusion that Romans 3:4 speaks of God's saving righteousness is not unique to this study. However, typical arguments in favour of this view are susceptible to significant criticism. Specifically, they do not demonstrate how the whole of Psalm 50LXX shapes Paul's argument, and/or they do not explore the possibility that Psalm 50:6LXX also refers to God's saving righteousness. This article addresses both issues. After reviewing the theological and exegetical significance of Romans 3:4, four major questions that challenge readers today will be surveyed. Next, an integrated exegesis of both passages, showing how Psalm 50:6LXX sheds light on Romans 3, will be presented.

10 citations

18 Jun 2015
TL;DR: Lee et al. as mentioned in this paper developed and implemented a Sunday school curriculum to equip the parents at Eunhye Korean Presbyterian Church (EKPC), Indianapolis, Indiana, to be the primary disciple makers of their children.
Abstract: EQUPPIING PARENTS AT EUNHYE KOREAN PRESBYTERAN CHURCH, INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA, TO BE THE PRIMARY DISCIPLE MAKERS OF TEHIR CHILDREN Choonghyun Lee, D.Min. The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2015 Faculty Supervisor: Shane Parker This project deals with the issue of developing and implementing a Sunday School curriculum to equip the parents at Eunhye Korean Presbyterian Church (EKPC), Indianapolis, Indiana, to be the primary disciple makers of their children. Chapter 1 lays out the purpose, goals, ministry context, rationale, limitations and delimitations, and research methodology. Chapter 2 examines a biblical foundation for family discipleship. The chapter focuses on the exegesis and exposition of the related passages: Deuteronomy 6:4-9, Genesis 18:16-19, Psalm 78:1-8, Matthew 28:16-20, Ephesians 6:4 and Colossians 3:21, and 2 Timothy 1:3-10. All these passages addresses that God calls parents to be the primary disciple-makers of their children. Chapter 3 addresses a historical support for family discipleship and family ministry. Throughout Christian history, the parents’ role as the primary disciplers of their children has been emphasized and implemented in the church and the home. This chapter addresses how historical theologians and pastors have embraced and implemented parents’ spiritual role in their children’s lives. Chapter 4 outlines the implementation of the project by describing the process from start to finish. The chapter includes the explanation of questionnaires, the focal group, and a week-by-week process. Chapter 5 is an evaluation of the project and a statement of theological and personal reflections.

9 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper argued that the LXX of Joshua 24 displays an anti-Samaritan attitude and that it embeds the covenant of Joshua24 in the broader narrative of apostasy and fall.
Abstract: The differences between the MT and LXX texts of Joshua 24 are numerous and complex. In this essay, I will discuss these differences from a theological viewpoint. I will start with the assumption that the MT of Joshua 24 displays a distinctive pro-Samaritan attitude. The aim of this essay is to determine the theological viewpoint of the LXX of Joshua 24 regarding the attitude toward the Samaritan question. I will argue that the LXX of Joshua 24 displays an antiSamaritan attitude and that it embeds the covenant of Joshua 24 in the broader narrative of apostasy and fall, in sharp contrast to the MT of Joshua 24.

9 citations


Cites background from "Psalms 51-100"

  • ...This is often interpreted as a wisdom or even didactic term (Tate 1990:33)....

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  • ...This reinforces the idea that the Psalm functions as a lesson or a parable (Tate 1990:281) In Joshua 24, Shiloh seems to be used as a polemic against any place of worship other than Jerusalem....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the significance of the phrase and location of crossing the Jordan in the 4th Gospel of John is investigated. But it is not shown how to identify the location of the crossing in 1.28 (problematically).
Abstract: There are three occurrences of the phrase πραν τοῦ Ἰορδάνου in John (1.28; 3.26; and 10.40) at a location identified in 1.28 (problematically) as Bethany. The significance of the phrase and location is developed first by exploring Bethany as Bashan via Micah 7.14–15, Jer 50.19–20 and Ps 68, and secondly by considering the significance of ‘crossing the Jordan’ in the OT and 1QS. The gospel is shown to invert the traditional motif; for John one finds life with God in Jesus by crossing the Jordan out of Israel, to Bashan, indicating an unexplored symbol in the Fourth Gospel.

9 citations