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Psalms 51-100

19 Mar 1991-
TL;DR: The middle section of the Hebrew Psalter has long been regarded as an inspiring anthology of ancient religious poetry as discussed by the authors, and a careful reading of Psalms 51-100 will stimulate a deeper appreciation for this religious poetry while augmenting the value of personal Bible study.
Abstract: The middle section of the Hebrew Psalter has long been regarded as an inspiring anthology of ancient religious poetry. Within this part of the Sepher Tehillim or Book of Praises, are 11 of the 12 psalms of Asaph (73-83), one of Solomon's two (72), the sole offerings of Ethan (89) and Moses (90), and four of the songs ascribed to the sons of Korah-not to mention the many assigned to David. Dr. Marvin Tate's distinctive commentary traces all the biographical, historical, literary, and practical concepts of these middle psalms and demonstrates how the purpose of each one unfolds. Psalms 51-100, Volume 20 of the Word Biblical Commentary series, furnishes readers with a wealth of information: a thorough, up-to-date bibliography preceding each psalm the author's fresh translation of the Hebrew text Form/Structure/Setting notes which expand the translation extensive comments on the text explanations of the pertinent observations of the author Dr. Tate has also attempted to present various views of passages in which differences of opinion exist. This work, the middle commentary of Word Biblical Commentary's three-volume study of the Psalter, mirrors the opposing emotions so often evident in life: sorrow-joy, love-hate, and faith-fear. A careful reading of Psalms 51-100 will stimulate a deeper appreciation for this religious poetry while augmenting the value of personal Bible study.
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Dissertation
01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: In this article, the influence of Hebrew Divine Warrior Traditions (HDWT) on the Markan sea-miracles (Mark 4.35-41; 6.45-52) and exorcisms (Mark 1.21-28; 5.1-20; 7.24-30; 9.14-29).
Abstract: Within the wider framework of contemporary debates on primitive NT Christology concerning the early Christians’ perception of the divinity of Jesus, this work investigates the influence of Hebrew Divine Warrior Traditions (HDWT) on the Markan sea-miracles (Mark 4.35-41; 6.45-52) and exorcisms (Mark 1.21-28; 5.1-20; 7.24-30; 9.14-29). In a final form, narrative approach to the Markan text, this study seeks to demonstrate that as part of his “high” Christology, Mark draws on the HDWT in such a way as to liken Jesus to God the Divine Warrior in “Old Testament” and Second Temple Jewish texts. The present work argues that in the sea-miracles and exorcisms, Mark transfers divine attributes and operations to Jesus, claiming some form of divine identity for Jesus. The findings of this study are then considered in terms of their implications for Mark’s Christology, and located in relation to the work of leading scholars on primitive Christology in general.

8 citations

DOI
11 Sep 2015
TL;DR: This paper explored the figurative exploitations of the word "shadow" in Biblical Hebrew and found that the translators refrain from using the equivalent of "salvation" in those contexts involving the abstract idea of protection and rather opt for the noun σκeπη.
Abstract: The first part of this article explores the figurative exploitations of the word צל ‘shadow’ in Biblical Hebrew. Special attention is paid to the poetical language. Alongside the metonymy “shelter”, the metaphorical usage of this word is centred on the ideas of protection and transitoriness. The second part of the article takes into account the renderings of צל in the Old Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible. The data collected suggest that the translators refrain from using the equivalent σκιά in those contexts involving the abstract idea of protection and rather opt for the noun σκeπη. The discussion moves further by evaluating the motivations that could have led the translators to judge the term σκιά as unsuitable to express the idea of protection metaphorically. A first line of argument takes into account factors within the Hebrew biblical text; a second line of argument considers the usage of σκιά within Greek literary sources; finally, a third line of argument looks at those non-literary varieties of Greek found in documentary papyri of the Ptolemaic age

8 citations

01 Jan 2011
TL;DR: In this article, the authors define feminism and feminist biblical interpretation, conveying the critiques of Rosemary Radford Ruether and Julia M. O'Brien who were scholarly dialogue partners, studying the social milieu of ancient Israel, using historical, literary, textual, and social criticism to exegete texts that mention Yahweh as father.
Abstract: The goal of this thesis was to appropriate the image of Yahweh as father for modern Christendom in light of feminist critiques of the image. The methods in accomplishing this task were as follows: defining feminism and feminist biblical interpretation, conveying the critiques of Rosemary Radford Ruether and Julia M. O’Brien who were scholarly dialogue partners, studying the social milieu of ancient Israel, using historical, literary, textual, and social criticism to exegete texts that mention Yahweh as father, comparing findings of exegesis with social milieu of ancient Israel, responding to critiques of Ruether and O’Brien, and lastly taking the findings of these methods and appropriating the image. It was discovered that if one takes the role of Yahweh as father in light of the Israel’s social milieu in the OT, appropriation can occur in these four ways: a father raises his child with love by encouraging autonomy for the sake of community, seeing the image of Yahweh as father as a liberation motif, realizing the importance of the image of Yahweh as mother and father in light of Gen 1 and 2, which encourages androgynous wholeness, and understanding the power and inability of metaphors, yet reaching for their potential.

8 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that the relationship between creation and conflict is not that creation occurs through conflict; rather, conflict comes through the process of creation, and that the fundamental conflict between God and his creatures is evidenced by two conflicts: conflict at sea with Leviathan/Rahab (Pss 74:12-17; 89:9-14), and conflict on land with the serpent and humankind (Gen 2:4b-3:24).
Abstract: Gunkel in his "Creation and Chaos in the Primeval Era and the Eschaton" argued that the Chaoskampf motif which had its origin in the Babylonian account of creation Enuma Elish is found in two groups of texts: those dealing with the dragon and those dealing with the primal sea. Scholars have since tended to regard the OT as portraying the creation of the universe as the result of a cosmic conflict between God and Chaos. The aim in this paper is not so much to challenge Gunkel's thesis, which others have already done, but to analyse the OT's multiple and diverse voices regarding the protological events. This paper suggests that the relationship between creation and conflict is not that creation occurs through conflict; rather, conflict comes through the process of creation. That is, the fundamental conflict between God and his creatures is evidenced by two conflicts: conflict at sea with Leviathan/Rahab (Pss 74:12-17; 89:9-14), and conflict on land with the serpent and humankind (Gen 2:4b-3:24).

6 citations


Cites background from "Psalms 51-100"

  • ...The Egyptians, the evil force that threatens the exist- 35 See Peter Enns, Exodus (NIVAC; Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2000), 213, 230; Bernard Och, “Creation and Redemption: Towards a Theology of Creation,” Judaism 44 (1995): 226–243, 236; Terence E. Fretheim, “The Reclamation of Creation: Redemption and Law in Exodus,” Int 45 (1991): 358; Ronald Simkins, Creator and Creation: Nature in the Worldview of Ancient Israel (Peabody: Hendrickson, 1994), 109–112....

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  • ...35 See Peter Enns, Exodus (NIVAC; Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2000), 213, 230; Bernard Och, “Creation and Redemption: Towards a Theology of Creation,” Judaism 44 (1995): 226–243, 236; Terence E. Fretheim, “The Reclamation of Creation: Redemption and Law in Exodus,” Int 45 (1991): 358; Ronald Simkins, Creator and Creation: Nature in the Worldview of Ancient Israel (Peabody: Hendrickson, 1994), 109–112....

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  • ...35 See Peter Enns, Exodus (NIVAC; Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2000), 213, 230; Bernard Och, “Creation and Redemption: Towards a Theology of Creation,” Judaism 44 (1995): 226–243, 236; Terence E....

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  • ...See Daniel P. Fuller, The Unity of the Bible: Unfolding of God’s Plan for Humanity (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1992), 223....

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