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Psalms 51-100

19 Mar 1991-
TL;DR: The middle section of the Hebrew Psalter has long been regarded as an inspiring anthology of ancient religious poetry as discussed by the authors, and a careful reading of Psalms 51-100 will stimulate a deeper appreciation for this religious poetry while augmenting the value of personal Bible study.
Abstract: The middle section of the Hebrew Psalter has long been regarded as an inspiring anthology of ancient religious poetry. Within this part of the Sepher Tehillim or Book of Praises, are 11 of the 12 psalms of Asaph (73-83), one of Solomon's two (72), the sole offerings of Ethan (89) and Moses (90), and four of the songs ascribed to the sons of Korah-not to mention the many assigned to David. Dr. Marvin Tate's distinctive commentary traces all the biographical, historical, literary, and practical concepts of these middle psalms and demonstrates how the purpose of each one unfolds. Psalms 51-100, Volume 20 of the Word Biblical Commentary series, furnishes readers with a wealth of information: a thorough, up-to-date bibliography preceding each psalm the author's fresh translation of the Hebrew text Form/Structure/Setting notes which expand the translation extensive comments on the text explanations of the pertinent observations of the author Dr. Tate has also attempted to present various views of passages in which differences of opinion exist. This work, the middle commentary of Word Biblical Commentary's three-volume study of the Psalter, mirrors the opposing emotions so often evident in life: sorrow-joy, love-hate, and faith-fear. A careful reading of Psalms 51-100 will stimulate a deeper appreciation for this religious poetry while augmenting the value of personal Bible study.
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03 Jan 2018
TL;DR: Cantrell and Parker as mentioned in this paper presented a project to equip the parents at Crossroads Community Chapel in Winfield, West Virginia to teach God's redemptive story through family devotions using the Minor Prophets.
Abstract: EQUIPPING PARENTS AT CROSSROADS COMMUNITY CHAPEL IN WINFIELD, WEST VIRGINIA, TO TEACH GOD’S REDEMPTIVE STORY THROUGH FAMILY DEVOTIONS Bryan Michael Cantrell, D.Min. The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2017 Faculty Supervisor: Dr. Shane W. Parker The purpose of this project was to equip the parents at Crossroads Community Chapel in Winfield, West Virginia to teach God’s redemptive story through family devotions using the Minor Prophets. Chapter 1 defines the ministry context of Crossroads Community Chapel and details specific characteristics of the project. Chapter 2 identifies the biblical and theological foundations for family discipleship. An emphasis is given to the theme of God’s redemptive story through Scripture. Chapter 3 explores the historical and sociological foundations surrounding family discipleship and the role of parents. Chapter 4 details the development of the devotional series and the specific steps taken during the process of the project, including planning, implementation and gathering of results. Chapter 5 provides an evaluation of the results of the project and personal

6 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2009-Shofar
TL;DR: In this paper, a threefold literary reading of Psalm 81 is presented, which explores the changes in the meaning of the original psalm from its reading as an individual text to its reading in light of the context in which it appears.
Abstract: Psalm 81 constitutes an Exodus psalm in which YHWH speaks directly to his people, admonishing them against worshipping foreign gods. As an incentive to obedience, YHWH recalls the punishments he inflicted against Israel's forefathers for disobeying this injunction, and promises blessings to those who obey him. In addition to the original meaning intended by the psalmist, Psalm 81 bears additional meanings and serves additional functions depending on the contexts in which it appears. Thus the individual meaning of the composition differs from the meaning it adopts within the complex of its neighbors, Psalms 80 and 82. Similarly, its function alters again when read together with its related intertexts. The present study constitutes a threefold literary reading of Psalm 81 that explores the changes in Psalm 81's meaning from its reading as an individual text, to its reading in light of the aforementioned contexts. Even though the present paper adopts a synchronic approach to intertextuality, it nevertheless raises the probability of either the psalmist or the authors of Psalm 81's intertexts purposefully reinterpreting their sources.

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Ps 74:13 is normally translated as "you divided (the sea), and this passage has been interpreted as referring to the exodus or to the division into two of the chaos monster at the time of creation, as in Enuma Elish.
Abstract: The word פוררת in Ps 74:13 is normally translated as “you divided (the sea),” and this passage has been interpreted as referring to the exodus or to the division into two of the chaos monster at the time of creation, as in Enuma Elish. The meaning “to divide,” however, has no etymological support. In Ugaritic and Akkadian * prr means “to break” or “to shatter.” Akkadian parāru with the meaning “breaking” appears in the context of killing Tiamat (Ug. V, 162:37). In Enuma Elish, Tiamat is slain in IV, 103–5, and Marduk disperses (* prr ) Tiamat’s host in IV, 106. Much later, in IV, 137, he splits ( ḫepu ) her corpse. Psalm 74 reflects stages of actual battle, as does Enuma Elish: a king shatters (*פרר) the enemy leader; then the members of the enemy host are smashed (שבר) or crushed (רצץ) (vv. 13b–14a). Here the language of battle is used for natural phenomena such as the raging sea and the storm. No creation motif appears in this psalm, even in vv. 15–17. “You split open springs and brooks” (v. 15a) expresses the idea of creation by the resultative ; God causes springs and brooks to exist as the outcome of creative action. The text is unrelated to the origination of the earth itself. In this psalm the conflict motif is associated not with creation but with destruction.

5 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: A comparative analysis of African Traditional Religion and the Old Testament detects proximity and distance amid the two religions as mentioned in this paper, and Microcosmic similarities in prayer for protection between biblical psalms and Lozi prayer traditions confirm closeness in religious experience during times of danger between ancient Israelite society and contemporary African tribal societies.
Abstract: A comparative analysis of African Traditional Religion and the Old Testament detects proximity and distance amid the two religions. Microcosmic similarities in prayer for protection between biblical psalms and Lozi prayer traditions confirm closeness in religious experience during times of danger between ancient Israelite society and contemporary African tribal societies. Further, these similarities provide concrete points for dialogue between African Traditional Religion and biblical psalms. Inversely, differences underscore the uniqueness of prayer for protection in each of the biblical and African traditions.

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
John R. Levison1
TL;DR: The view that the Holy Spirit is the source of prophecy was believed by Jews during the tannaitic period to have withdrawn from Israel, to return only in the eschatological future, is built upon a pastiche of texts: Ps 74.9; 1 Macc 4.46, 9.27 and 14.41; Josephus's Ap. 85.3; Pr Azar 15; and t. Soṭa 13.2-4.
Abstract: The view that the Holy Spirit as the source of prophecy was believed by Jews during the tannaitic period to have withdrawn from Israel, to return only in the eschatological future, is built upon a pastiche of texts: Ps 74.9; 1 Macc 4.46, 9.27 and 14.41; Josephus's Ap. 1.37—41; 2 Apoc. Bar. 85.3; Pr Azar 15; and t. Soṭa 13.2—4. On the basis of such texts, E. Sjoberg referred to ‘a widespread theological conviction’ about the withdrawal of the Holy Spirit and J. Vos to ‘die verbreitete Tradition’. C. K. Barrett quoted G. F. Moore approvingly: ‘The Holy Spirit is the Spirit of prophecy … The Holy Spirit is so specifically prophetic inspiration that when Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi, the last prophets, died, the Holy Spirit departed from Israel.’ W. D. Davies suggested cautiously, after a thorough analysis of the data, ‘… we may now assume that Paul was reared within a Judaism which, to use very moderate language, tended to relegate the activity of the Holy Spirit to the past’. G. W. H. Lampe generalized, ‘In the main, the Spirit continues to be thought of as being, pre-eminently, the Spirit of prophecy, manifested in the distant past in such great figures as Elijah (Ecclus. 48.12) or Isaiah (vs. 24), but which was now no longer present in Israel.’ J. Jeremias subtitled section nine of his New Testament Theology ‘The Return of the Quenched Spirit’, and

5 citations