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Psalms 51-100

19 Mar 1991-
TL;DR: The middle section of the Hebrew Psalter has long been regarded as an inspiring anthology of ancient religious poetry as discussed by the authors, and a careful reading of Psalms 51-100 will stimulate a deeper appreciation for this religious poetry while augmenting the value of personal Bible study.
Abstract: The middle section of the Hebrew Psalter has long been regarded as an inspiring anthology of ancient religious poetry. Within this part of the Sepher Tehillim or Book of Praises, are 11 of the 12 psalms of Asaph (73-83), one of Solomon's two (72), the sole offerings of Ethan (89) and Moses (90), and four of the songs ascribed to the sons of Korah-not to mention the many assigned to David. Dr. Marvin Tate's distinctive commentary traces all the biographical, historical, literary, and practical concepts of these middle psalms and demonstrates how the purpose of each one unfolds. Psalms 51-100, Volume 20 of the Word Biblical Commentary series, furnishes readers with a wealth of information: a thorough, up-to-date bibliography preceding each psalm the author's fresh translation of the Hebrew text Form/Structure/Setting notes which expand the translation extensive comments on the text explanations of the pertinent observations of the author Dr. Tate has also attempted to present various views of passages in which differences of opinion exist. This work, the middle commentary of Word Biblical Commentary's three-volume study of the Psalter, mirrors the opposing emotions so often evident in life: sorrow-joy, love-hate, and faith-fear. A careful reading of Psalms 51-100 will stimulate a deeper appreciation for this religious poetry while augmenting the value of personal Bible study.
Citations
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TL;DR: The identification of these אלהים as divine kings ruling over the nations provides a better explanation for the content of the psalm than previously proposed identifications of these figures as human judges, tyrannical foreign rulers abusing subjugated Israel/Judah, or deities of the pan theon other than Yahweh as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: As has frequently been noted in the substantial literature on Psalm 82, there are few psalms that have raised more interpretive debate, despite the high degree of certainty about the text.1 Hans-Joachim Kraus highlights the interpretive diffi culties with the following statement: "Psalm 82 is of such exceptional character in the Psalter that it could well be impossible to provide interpretations that are in every respect satisfactory."2 The identity of the אלהים in w. 1 and 6 is central to these interpretive difficulties. These אלהים, who are condemned to die for their failure to maintain justice in the realm of human affairs, have been a contentious issue in the translation and interpretation of this psalm at least since the time of the ancient versions. I will propose here that the identification of these אלהים as divine kings ruling over the nations provides a better explanation for the content of the psalm than previously proposed identifications of these figures as human judges, tyrannical foreign rulers abusing subjugated Israel/Judah, or deities of the pan theon other than Yahweh. There are three issues that are central to any interpreta tion of this psalm: first, the setting for the event described in the psalm; second, Yahweh's role in the event; and third, the identity of the אלהים mentioned in w. 1 and 6. Although the last of these issues is the primary focus here, the other issues are so integral to the identity of the אלהים that they will also be discussed in some detail.

5 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors employ an exegetical and comparative method to investigate the nature of the Old Testament angelology, particularly in the enigmatic form of a "Divine Council" of Yahweh as presented in the description of Old Testament Angelology and the "mild divine monarchy" in the traditional African understanding of the spirit world.
Abstract: The article, employing an exegetical and comparative method, investigates the nature of Old Testament angelology particularly in the enigmatic form of a 'Divine Council' of Yahweh as presented in the description of Old Testament angelology and the 'mild divine monarchy' in the traditional African understanding of the spirit world. Through exegetical means, the first part of the article stresses the theological significance of the form, motif and the general description of the 'Divine Council' in 2 Kings 22:1-23; Job 1-2 and Psalms 82. The second part of the paper highlights the presence of a 'flexible divine monarchy' in traditional African worldview as underscored in the theological studies of African cosmology in the writings of Idowu, Parrinder, Mbiti and Bediako. From this framework, the study argues that the description of Israel's spiritual realm in the form of 'Divine Council' bears some similarities to the dominant portrayal of the African spirit world, particularly in the 'flexible monarchical' description of the African spirit world. The paper explores this basic hypothesis, but also stresses the differences between the two categories under study. For the study, the obvious difference between the two categories lies in the polytheistic nature of African spirit world and the monotheistic description of Old Testament angelology whereby subsidiary elements (whether gods or angels) are subsumed under the authority of Yahweh. Even though such inclination was strongly entertained in traditional African society, however, during the evolution of African traditional religion, the 'gods' (or intermediaries) did not properly evolve into a wholly monotheistic description. Consequently, these intermediaries neither stayed as refractions of the supreme deity, nor angels of the Supreme God, as with Yahweh in the Old Testament, but instead they became gods in themselves, because these intermediaries requested or required cultic worship, ritual and exigencies that are foreign and inadequate in the description and understanding of the angelic intermediaries of the Old Testament.

4 citations

01 Jan 2009
TL;DR: Cloyce Sutton I as mentioned in this paper was the first person to propose the idea of the SINR-SUNGAC algorithm, i.e., "Sutton-Sutton algorithm".
Abstract: Cloyce Sutton I

4 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, the embodied experiences of the poet are verbalized and metaphorised in terms of the societal body, the people of Israel in distress after their return from the Babylonian exile.
Abstract: In this paper Psalm 85 is approached from the angle of embodied language. The embodied experiences of the poet are verbalised and metaphorised in terms of the societal body, the people of Israel in distress after their return from the Babylonian exile. The societal body of Israel, the role of “land” in the psalm, and the three-dimensional relationship between God, the people, and the land are analyzed in terms of the embodied rhetoric implemented by the poet in order to indicate how the embodied language expresses the yearning for whole-bodiedness by the returned exiles.

4 citations