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Psalms 51-100

19 Mar 1991-
TL;DR: The middle section of the Hebrew Psalter has long been regarded as an inspiring anthology of ancient religious poetry as discussed by the authors, and a careful reading of Psalms 51-100 will stimulate a deeper appreciation for this religious poetry while augmenting the value of personal Bible study.
Abstract: The middle section of the Hebrew Psalter has long been regarded as an inspiring anthology of ancient religious poetry. Within this part of the Sepher Tehillim or Book of Praises, are 11 of the 12 psalms of Asaph (73-83), one of Solomon's two (72), the sole offerings of Ethan (89) and Moses (90), and four of the songs ascribed to the sons of Korah-not to mention the many assigned to David. Dr. Marvin Tate's distinctive commentary traces all the biographical, historical, literary, and practical concepts of these middle psalms and demonstrates how the purpose of each one unfolds. Psalms 51-100, Volume 20 of the Word Biblical Commentary series, furnishes readers with a wealth of information: a thorough, up-to-date bibliography preceding each psalm the author's fresh translation of the Hebrew text Form/Structure/Setting notes which expand the translation extensive comments on the text explanations of the pertinent observations of the author Dr. Tate has also attempted to present various views of passages in which differences of opinion exist. This work, the middle commentary of Word Biblical Commentary's three-volume study of the Psalter, mirrors the opposing emotions so often evident in life: sorrow-joy, love-hate, and faith-fear. A careful reading of Psalms 51-100 will stimulate a deeper appreciation for this religious poetry while augmenting the value of personal Bible study.
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Dissertation
01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a BIBLIOGRAFIE-based approach to solve the problem of homonymity in the Internet: http://www.blabeliografaefie.org/
Abstract: .....................................................................................................349 BIBLIOGRAFIE ......................................................................................................351

4 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors view the prophet's critique of the priesthood as part of a larger prophetic rhetoric to convict of sin, explain God's plan, and indicate the hope of salvation.
Abstract: The aim of this publication will be twofold: Firstly, to view Psalm 51, especially those verses which can be designated as cult-critical. Secondly, to indicate that the prophetic critique is part of a larger prophetic rhetoric to convict of sin, to explain God’s plan, and to indicate the hope of salvation. The cult criticism of Psalm 51:18-19, however, is not a repudiation of the cult and cultic practices: the fact that a later redactor added the last two verses (Ps 51:20-21) after verses 18-19, proves this point. Therefore, it would be incorrect to see the prophetic critique of the priesthood as a sign that the priests and the prophets were incompatible, or that the prophets wanted to discredit and discard the temple cult.

4 citations


Cites background from "Psalms 51-100"

  • ...Cf. also Becker 1966:68; Dalglish 1962:201-7; Schmidt 1994:346, 358 and Tate 1990:29-30....

    [...]

  • ...The psalm herewith expresses the real meaning of sacrifice: confession, forgiveness, total dependence on a merciful God and a joyful new life that emerges from that process (Tate 1990:26-8; cf. also Courtman 1995:52-6)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the 1963 Festschrift for G. R. Driver, Sigmund Mowinckel argued that Biblical Hebrew שחל originally denoted a mythical serpent dragon and later came to be used as a poetical term for a lion as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: In the 1963 Festschrift for G. R. Driver, Sigmund Mowinckel argued that Biblical Hebrew שחל originally denoted a mythical serpent dragon and later came to be used as a poetical term for a lion. That meaning, he believed, was evident above all in Job 28:8.1 He states, "Originally שחל may have meant the serpent dragon, the mythical wyvern or 'Lindwurm'. Because of the combination of serpent (dragon) and lion in mythopoetical and artistic fancy, it has also been adopted as a term for the lion."2 Few have been convinced by Mowinckel's argument that שחל denotes a snake, and still fewer by his mythopoetical explanation of the term's resultant double meaning: "lion" and "serpent."3 Mowinckel's position is no doubt weakened by some

4 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors argue for a translation of the phrase "I will rear back my hand above their foes" to "My hand" in the context of the "iconography of the blow".
Abstract: Psalm 81 contains a divine oracle in which Yhwh promises to act against Israel’s enemies. The nature of that activity, however, is unclear, particularly as v. 15b describes it: ועל צריהם אשיב ידי. How does the verbal action—ostensibly some sort of “turning” (√שוב)—relate to the verbal object of the sentence, ידי (“my hand”), as well as the prepositional phrase beginning with על On the basis of evidence from the immediate literary context as well as iconographic data from the ancient Near East, this essay argues for a translation “I will rear back my hand above their foes.” The text thus provides a literary instantiation of the iconographic trope of the Egyptian king lifting his hand menacingly above his subjugated enemies. As such, it reflects both a borrowing and a bold reappropriation of Egyptian imagery. The allusion to the “iconography of the blow” reminds the community that Yhwh has supplanted the pharaoh in his position of dominance and now stands ready to vanquish any other foe who might oppose them.

4 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, an interdisciplinary investigation of the value clash in 1-Samuel 19:10-18a is presented, using insights from Old Testament studies, ethics and anthropology.
Abstract: A dissertation providing an interdisciplinary investigation of the value clash in 1 Samuel 19:10-18a that employs insights from Old Testament studies, ethics and anthropology

4 citations