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Psalms 51-100

19 Mar 1991-
TL;DR: The middle section of the Hebrew Psalter has long been regarded as an inspiring anthology of ancient religious poetry as discussed by the authors, and a careful reading of Psalms 51-100 will stimulate a deeper appreciation for this religious poetry while augmenting the value of personal Bible study.
Abstract: The middle section of the Hebrew Psalter has long been regarded as an inspiring anthology of ancient religious poetry. Within this part of the Sepher Tehillim or Book of Praises, are 11 of the 12 psalms of Asaph (73-83), one of Solomon's two (72), the sole offerings of Ethan (89) and Moses (90), and four of the songs ascribed to the sons of Korah-not to mention the many assigned to David. Dr. Marvin Tate's distinctive commentary traces all the biographical, historical, literary, and practical concepts of these middle psalms and demonstrates how the purpose of each one unfolds. Psalms 51-100, Volume 20 of the Word Biblical Commentary series, furnishes readers with a wealth of information: a thorough, up-to-date bibliography preceding each psalm the author's fresh translation of the Hebrew text Form/Structure/Setting notes which expand the translation extensive comments on the text explanations of the pertinent observations of the author Dr. Tate has also attempted to present various views of passages in which differences of opinion exist. This work, the middle commentary of Word Biblical Commentary's three-volume study of the Psalter, mirrors the opposing emotions so often evident in life: sorrow-joy, love-hate, and faith-fear. A careful reading of Psalms 51-100 will stimulate a deeper appreciation for this religious poetry while augmenting the value of personal Bible study.
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01 Jan 2004
TL;DR: The Apostolic Church will survive the 21st century by allowing greater autonomy, with the apostolic function and the prophetic voice finding expression primarily through the local assembly as discussed by the authors, and there exists a trend towards relationship-based apostleship, utilising the concept of networks.
Abstract: The Apostolic Church of New Zealand forms a distinct group within the pentecostal movement on account of its practice of "divine government." The revelation of the restoration of apostle and prophet ministry, which originally came to the founders in the UK, served to establish a denomination which espoused prophetic guidance in matters of praxis and doctrine. The purpose of this thesis has been to critique the Apostolic Church's understanding of not only the doctrine of subsequence (i.e. Spirit-baptism is logically distinct from and subsequent to salvation) but the function of the prophetic and its effect on the organisational structure and operation of the church. A major focus of the early Apostolic churchmen was a defence of subsequence. Widespread mainstream opposition ensured pentecostals endured an isolation which served to reinforce their determination to validate the empowerment that they had experienced. As the need for polemic reduced, the emphasis shifted to promoting the gift of the Spirit as a missionary endowment. Methodist-Holiness teaching formed the basis for the early influences on pentecostal theology and as such promoted a verifiable work of the Spirit given in response to seeking. The challenge and influence from the Latter Rain and Charismatic movements saw the bestowal of the gift without an attendant period of tarrying. While this brought a universality to the experience, it did so at the expense of depth or intensity, with a resulting weakening in the expression of prophecy. An assessment of the view of prophecy held by the early Apostolic churchmen shows that too high a level of inspiration was often credited to prophetic utterance. The possibility of human frailty corrupting the purposes of God was not countenanced to any great degree, with the result that flawed or outright erroneous decisions proceeded unchallenged: in this the role of the apostle was under-exercised. The combination of a high view of prophecy and a decreasing quality of utterance over time affected the level of guidance available to the movement. The operation of the apostle necessarily changed: previously concerned with outworking the "Word of the Lord," the function of the apostle became limited to that of superintendent minister. The inability of the first and second generation Apostolics to recognise their schismatic origins perpetuated the rigid adherence to centralism, believing it to be the divine pattern. Centralised control manifested in two spheres: finance and personnel. Initially, when the movement was small, centralism was an expedient philosophy; however, its usefulness was soon outgrown. A retarding factor for the Apostolic Church has been the lack of autonomy afforded local assemblies and the ineptitude of the centralised government, which frequently mismatched men and their roles. Currently, there exists a trend towards relationship-based apostleship, utilising the concept of networks. A particular subset of this system is the church plant where a natural line of authority exists between it and the parent church. Prophecy operating in this situation confines itself to expansion, and avoids the problem, evident in previous years, of centralised revelation initiating the relocation of personnel. The Apostolic Church will survive the 21st century by allowing greater autonomy, with the apostolic function and the prophetic voice finding expression primarily through the local assembly.

3 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, an intertextual method of reading the Psalms in order to discern the full meaning of the theophany of Ps 97 is presented, and it is argued thatPs 97 actualizes the claims in Pss 93-100 that Yahweh reigns by giving the reader a (textual) theophaney which would have been particularly meaningful in an exilic or post-exilic context.
Abstract: This article applies an intertextual method of reading the Psalms in order to discern the full meaning of the theophany of Ps 97. It is argued that Ps 97 actualizes the claims in Pss 93-100 that Yahweh reigns by giving the reader a (textual) theophany which would have been particularly meaningful in an exilic or post-exilic context.

3 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Psalms 52-55 constitute a cluster of psalms with significant links to one another, to Proverbs, and also to the history of David as mentioned in this paper, and they were both also influenced by motifs from Jer 9.
Abstract: Psalms 52-55 constitute a cluster of psalms with significant links to one another, to Proverbs, and also to the history of David Psalms 52 and 55 were both also influenced by motifs from Jer 9 These features point to their having been composed (Ps 52) or edited (Ps 55) with a specific focus in mind This article attempts to read Psalm 55 on its own, but also within the context of the cluster and in its relationship to Jer 9 as well as David’s history in order to refine our knowledge of the problems, values, hopes and expectations of the Persian period editors who compiled and edited the cluster

3 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors adopt a simplified literary method in Biblical research that takes cognizance of the varied poetic techniques in Psalm 72 and engage in a detailed comparative study of a Psalm composed more than two millennia ago and a prayer of our time.
Abstract: Contextualizationof Biblical texts is a priority of every exegete, who endeavors to bring the ancient scripts to dialogue with contemporary issues. This paper, which studies Psalm 72 and a prayer composed for good governance in Anambra State Nigeria, focuses on this hermeneutical interpretation. The writer adopts a simplified literary method in Biblical research that takes cognizance of the varied poetic techniques in Psalm 72 and engages in a detailed comparative study of a Psalm composed more than two millennia ago and a prayer of our time. Such comparative study reveals a striking similar preoccupation of the composers of both texts. Both prayed for good governance of which all developing countries today are in dire need.

3 citations


Cites background from "Psalms 51-100"

  • ...In Ps 72, “they pray for the life of the king in order that the king may give them life which enables them, in turn, to pray” (Tate, 1990: 226)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors investigated the reasons why the editors made this connection with the experience of David and how the intertextual connections this heading creates modifies the hermeneutical horizon of the psalm.
Abstract: The heading of Ps 56 connects the psalm with "David," and specifically with the time when he was "seized" by the Philistines in Gath. The psalm can be described as a lament with a strong emphasis on trust in God and praise for his word. This article investigates the reasons why the editors made this connection with the experience of David and how the intertextual connections this heading creates modifies the hermeneutical horizon of the psalm. It is suggested that the psalm, in view of its heading, serves to exonerate David from the fear that he experienced according to 1 Sam 21:13. It also focuses the attention of its readers on the way in which David triumphed in a situation of unjust persecution through his trust in Yahweh in order to walk freely in praise of God.

3 citations