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Psalms 51-100

19 Mar 1991-
TL;DR: The middle section of the Hebrew Psalter has long been regarded as an inspiring anthology of ancient religious poetry as discussed by the authors, and a careful reading of Psalms 51-100 will stimulate a deeper appreciation for this religious poetry while augmenting the value of personal Bible study.
Abstract: The middle section of the Hebrew Psalter has long been regarded as an inspiring anthology of ancient religious poetry. Within this part of the Sepher Tehillim or Book of Praises, are 11 of the 12 psalms of Asaph (73-83), one of Solomon's two (72), the sole offerings of Ethan (89) and Moses (90), and four of the songs ascribed to the sons of Korah-not to mention the many assigned to David. Dr. Marvin Tate's distinctive commentary traces all the biographical, historical, literary, and practical concepts of these middle psalms and demonstrates how the purpose of each one unfolds. Psalms 51-100, Volume 20 of the Word Biblical Commentary series, furnishes readers with a wealth of information: a thorough, up-to-date bibliography preceding each psalm the author's fresh translation of the Hebrew text Form/Structure/Setting notes which expand the translation extensive comments on the text explanations of the pertinent observations of the author Dr. Tate has also attempted to present various views of passages in which differences of opinion exist. This work, the middle commentary of Word Biblical Commentary's three-volume study of the Psalter, mirrors the opposing emotions so often evident in life: sorrow-joy, love-hate, and faith-fear. A careful reading of Psalms 51-100 will stimulate a deeper appreciation for this religious poetry while augmenting the value of personal Bible study.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a tripartite structure of the psalm 74 is proposed, based on various lexical and syntactic features of the prophet's lament and the interpretation of verses 12 and 17.
Abstract: This article proposes a tripartite structure of Psalm 74. The proposal is based on various lexical and syntactic features of the psalmist’s lament and sheds light on both the interpretation of the psalm as a whole and the interpretation of verses 12–17 in particular. It argues that these verses were interpolated to express a particular cosmogonic temple theology. When the psalm is viewed alongside comparable ancient Near Eastern literature from loci such as Ugarit, potential motives for this interpolation become evident. The interpolator sought to sharpen the petition to God by drawing on older, Canaanite mythology in hopes that such rhetorical maneuvers might occasion an acceptable solution to the psalmist’s lament.

3 citations

03 Jan 2017
TL;DR: Kuykendall and Bowen as discussed by the authors presented an eight-week family mealtime devotional curriculum, called I Spy, which was developed and evaluated by three identical parent training sessions and the pre-project survey was collected.
Abstract: EQUIPPING PARENTS OF BETHEL BIBLE CHURCH, TYLER, TEXAS, TO USE FAMILY MEALTIMES IN THE SPIRITUAL FORMATION OF THEIR CHILDREN Mark Daniel Kuykendall, D.Ed.Min. The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2016 Faculty Supervisor: Dr. Danny R. Bowen The project seeks to equip parents of Bethel Bible Church to use family mealtimes in the spiritual formation of their children. Chapter 1 gives the purpose, goals, establishes the context and rationale for equipping parents to use family meals to disciple their children. Chapter 2 explores the biblical precedent for both parents being the primary disciplers of their children and the power of meals in the spiritual formation of people. Chapter 3 focuses on the theoretical, philosophical, and practical issues for parents in using family mealtimes in the spiritual formation of their children. Chapter 4 explains the implementation of the project. The process began by assessing the current practices and perceptions of family discipleship. An eight-week family mealtime devotional curriculum, called “I Spy,” was developed and evaluated. Three identical parent training sessions were conducted and the pre-project survey was collected. Upon conclusion of the eight weeks a post-survey was collected for analysis. Chapter 5 offers an evaluation of the effectiveness, discusses strengths and weaknesses, and concludes with theological and personal reflections.

3 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this paper, the YHWH-mlk-psalms were studied against the background of the development of monotheism in Israel and the results of such a study would contribute to the better understanding of these psalms.
Abstract: The development of monotheism in Israel as background for the understanding of the JHWH-mlk-psalms The YHWH-mlk-psalms (Pss 47, 93, 96-99) are some of the best-known psalms in the Old Testament. The terminology, themes, images and ideas within these psalms suggest the existence of a strong common link. Since the beginning of the last century the YHWH-mlk-psalms were the focus of a lot of research. A variety of different backgrounds for the interpretation of these psalms have been suggested. Despite the large quantities of research done on the YHWH-mlk-psalms, there is still no consensus on how these psalms should be interpreted. The YHWH-mlk-psalms show various monotheistic characteristics of which the YHWH-mlk-reference (Pss 47:3; 93:1; 96:10; 98:6; 99:1, 4) forms only one example. This article proposes that the YHWH-mlk-psalms be studied against the background of the development of monotheism in Israel. The results of such a study would contribute to the better understanding of these psalms.

3 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors investigated the literary and theological provenance of the psalm Ps 91 and found that it was composed by someone who had access to Proverbs, in particular Prov 3, while Ps 91 itself played a role in the composition of Job 5:17-26.
Abstract: The paper investigates the literary and theological provenance of Ps 91. It is shown that Ps 91 (in its present form) was composed by someone who had access to Proverbs, in particular Prov 3, while Ps 91 itself played a role in the composition of Job 5:17–26. As part of the “triptych” formed by Pss 90, 91 and 92, the psalm was intended to strengthen the conviction of its author that Yahweh is able and willing to provide protection to the individual believer who attaches himself or herself wholeheartedly to his or her God, saving the true and wise believer from the fate that will befall the wicked fools.

3 citations

DissertationDOI
01 May 2023
TL;DR: In this article , an analysis of those passages in which Jesus' ascension is referred to directly (Heb 1:6; 4:14-16; 6:19-20; 9:11-14, 24; 10:19 -22) and a study of the imagery Hebrews uses to couch its theology is presented.
Abstract: Problem This dissertation studies the nature of Jesus’ ascension to heaven and its role in the argument of Hebrews. Method The study consists of an analysis of those passages in which Jesus’ ascension is referred to directly (Heb 1:6; 4:14-16; 6:19-20; 9:11-14, 24; 10:19-22) and a study of the imagery Hebrews uses to couch its theology, giving special attention to the role of this imagery in the progression of the argument. The study is both exegetical and theological in nature, seeking to provide an analysis of specific passages as well as systematization of their import. Results The six passages that refer explicitly to Jesus’ ascension in Hebrews (1:6; 4:14-16; 6:19-20; 9:11-14, 24; 10:19-22) associate the ascension with different aspects of Jesus’ achievements. Hebrews 1:6 relates the ascension with Jesus’ enthronement (also 4:14-16); 6:19-20, with his appointment as high priest; 9:11-14, 24 and 10:19-22, with the inauguration of the new covenant. All of these events form part of Jesus’ exaltation at the right hand of God (1:3, 13; 8:1; 10:12; 12:2) and contribute to his identity as “Son.” These achievements of Jesus have an intriguing similarity to the achievements of righteous Davidic kings in the Hebrew Bible: After ascending the throne, the righteous Davidic king would (1) renew the covenant between God and the nation, (2) cleanse the land, (3) build or repair the temple, (4) reform the cult and reorganize the priests and Levites, (5) promote the reunification of Israel, and (6) achieve rest by defeating the enemies. Finally, the rise to power of the Davidic king often coincides with (7) the emergence of a faithful priest. The Hebrew prophets and those early Jewish documents that continue to hold fast to a Davidic hope project these achievements into the future and elevate them to an eschatological dimension. Hebrews argues that Jesus fulfilled these expectations: Jesus is the “son” enthroned at the right hand of God (1:3, 5-6), he has defeated “death,” the enemy (2:14-16), built the “house of God” (3:1-6; 8:1-5), and provided “rest” for his people (4:1-10). His ascension to the throne implies as well the emergence of a new faithful priest of the order of Melchizedek (chaps. 5-7) and a reformation of the cult—specifically of the law of sacrifices (9:24-10:18) and priesthood (7:13-28). The new king cleanses his people (9:11-14), mediates a new covenant (9:15-23), and reforms the cult by establishing one sacrifice that is effective “once for all” (9:24-10:18) and multiple spiritual sacrifices (13:10-16), all of which conclude in a joyous celebration at Mount Zion (12:22-29)—as the reforms of ancient Jewish kings did. In other words, the study suggests that Hebrews conceives the ascension as the inauguration of Jesus’ office as “Son” at the “right hand of God” (Heb 1:3, 13; 4:14-16; 8:1-2; 10:12-13; 12:1-2) and that it understands the title “Son” as the fulfillment of the promise made to David (2 Sam 7:12-15) which is claimed for Jesus explicitly in Heb 1:5. Chapter 1 states the problem and analyzes the two answers that have been offered in scholarly literature (the Day of Atonement and the Inauguration of the Sanctuary as typologies or analogies to Jesus’ ascension). It also introduces the delimitations and methodology of the study. Chapter 2 presents the findings regarding the expectations of the rule of righteous Davidic kings both in the Hebrew Bible and early Jewish documents. Chapter 3 analyzes the ascension passages in Hebrews and their relationship to the fulfillment of the expectations regarding a future righteous Davidic king. Chapter 4 presents the results of the study. Conclusion Davidic traditions function as an essential subtext of Hebrews and provide the necessary force to its hortatory argument. The author of Hebrews argues that Jesus’ exaltation in heaven as the eschatological Davidic king brings about the fulfillment of God’s promises for his people: entrance into rest, an intercessor, cleansing from sin, and the restoration of the covenant. On the other hand, Jesus’ exaltation also demands their allegiance to him; otherwise, they will suffer the judgment of God. He exhorts them, then, to “hold fast the confession” so that they may inherit the promises of God.

2 citations