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Psalms 51-100

19 Mar 1991-
TL;DR: The middle section of the Hebrew Psalter has long been regarded as an inspiring anthology of ancient religious poetry as discussed by the authors, and a careful reading of Psalms 51-100 will stimulate a deeper appreciation for this religious poetry while augmenting the value of personal Bible study.
Abstract: The middle section of the Hebrew Psalter has long been regarded as an inspiring anthology of ancient religious poetry. Within this part of the Sepher Tehillim or Book of Praises, are 11 of the 12 psalms of Asaph (73-83), one of Solomon's two (72), the sole offerings of Ethan (89) and Moses (90), and four of the songs ascribed to the sons of Korah-not to mention the many assigned to David. Dr. Marvin Tate's distinctive commentary traces all the biographical, historical, literary, and practical concepts of these middle psalms and demonstrates how the purpose of each one unfolds. Psalms 51-100, Volume 20 of the Word Biblical Commentary series, furnishes readers with a wealth of information: a thorough, up-to-date bibliography preceding each psalm the author's fresh translation of the Hebrew text Form/Structure/Setting notes which expand the translation extensive comments on the text explanations of the pertinent observations of the author Dr. Tate has also attempted to present various views of passages in which differences of opinion exist. This work, the middle commentary of Word Biblical Commentary's three-volume study of the Psalter, mirrors the opposing emotions so often evident in life: sorrow-joy, love-hate, and faith-fear. A careful reading of Psalms 51-100 will stimulate a deeper appreciation for this religious poetry while augmenting the value of personal Bible study.
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27 Oct 2016
TL;DR: Brooks as mentioned in this paper argued that the divine design for suffering in Christ-followers is to decrease self-rule through mortification, increase God's rule through engendering spiritual maturity, with both of these functions serving the ultimate purpose of God glorifying himself in the individual lives of his covenant people.
Abstract: THE DIVINE DESIGN OF CHRISTIAN SUFFERING: MORTIFICATION, MATURATION, AND GLORIFICATION William James Brooks, Jr., Ph.D. The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2016 Chair: Dr. Jeremy P. Pierre Chapter 1 introduces the dissertation’s thesis and highlights its methodology. This dissertation argues that the divine design for suffering in Christ-followers is to decrease self-rule through mortification, increase God’s rule through engendering spiritual maturity, with both of these functions serving the ultimate purpose of God glorifying himself in the individual lives of his covenant people. This chapter also sets the argument within the contemporary context of biblical counseling. Chapter 2 explores the first major element of the thesis, that God designs suffering to decrease self-rule in his covenant people through mortification. This theme is traced through the lamenting psalmists, the Suffering King’s attack on self-rule via the cross, and Jesus’ imperative to self-denial. Chapter 3 argues the second major element of the thesis, that God designs suffering to increase his rule in his covenant people by engendering the blessings consistent with spiritual maturity. This thought is developed by examining the spiritual maturity suffering produced in the lamenting psalmists and Jesus. Six New Testament passages are examined which indicate suffering is instrumental in engendering spiritual maturity in the Christ-follower. Chapter 4 demonstrates the third major thesis element that suffering that the ultimate purpose of suffering in Christ-followers is to glorify God. This conclusion is reached by examining the lamenting psalmists glorification of God, Jesus glorifying the Father in his sufferings, Christ-followers’ glorification of Christ through suffering, and how God glorifies himself when suffering ceases. Chapter 5 defends the dissertation thesis against the challenges forwarded by open theism. The main arguments focus on open theism’s contention that no divine design for suffering exists and suffering is purposeless. The last section critiques the implications open theistic beliefs has on trusting God, Christ and the gospel, prayer, and eternal hope. Chapter 6 proposes that the cognitions, affections, and volitions of the heart are each mortified of their unchristlikenesses, conformed to Christlikeness, both for the glory of God through suffering. The last section is directed to biblical counselors to give indicators of self-rule in sufferers and to suggest how they may minister to all the suffering heart’s functions. Chapter 7 concludes the dissertation by giving a summary of its arguments, suggestions for further research, and some concluding thoughts.

62 citations

30 May 2013
TL;DR: Martin this paper presented a canonical-eschatological approach to the interpretation of the land promise in the New Testament, which is based on a historical-exegetical, epochal, and canonical-eccentric approach.
Abstract: BOUND FOR THE KINGDOM: THE LAND PROMISE IN GOD’S REDEMPTIVE PLAN Oren Rhea Martin, Ph.D. The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2013 Chair: Dr. Bruce A. Ware Chapter 1 introduces the thesis, states the purpose, and defines the dissertation’s specific goals. Attention is then given to a summary of research before a closing section presents the methodology that is used: a historical-exegetical, epochal, and canonical-eschatological approach to biblical interpretation and theological formulation. Chapter 2 provides the biblical-theological framework from which a theology of land can be canonically understood. More specifically, the framework for understanding the place, or land, of God’s people is the kingdom. God’s kingdom commences in Eden, and after the fall of mankind into sin God’s kingdom will come through his divinely-initiated covenants with his people. In the end, God will once again create a place—a new heaven and a new earth—for his people through the fulfillment of his covenant promises in Christ, who wins the new creation and reigns in his kingdom forever. Working out of this framework, the next two chapters trace the theme of land as it progressively unfolds across the canon. To begin, chapter 3 connects the promise of land to Abraham to the preceding events in Genesis 1-11. Then, the promise of land within the Abrahamic covenant is evaluated, which is followed by partial fulfillments through Israel’s history under leaders such as Joshua, David, and Solomon. However, each stage of fulfillment is not final, for every fulfillment is followed by covenant failure. Instead, each fulfillment and failure anticipates something greater, which the canonical prophets proclaim. What begins in the Old Testament is fulfilled in the New. Chapter 4, then, demonstrates the inaugurated fulfillment of the kingdom with the coming of Christ and his work. That is, the blessings of the land come now to those who are united to Christ by faith and they await their future, final fulfillment in the new creation. Thus, the fulfillment of the land in the New Testament is inaugurated but not yet consummated. Finally, chapter 5 summarizes and concludes the overall argument of this dissertation. The argument is then evaluated in light of the two dominant theological systems today, namely, dispensationalism and covenant theology. VITA Oren Rhea Martin EDUCATIONAL Diploma, J. Frank Dobie High School, Houston, Texas, 1993 B. A., University of Houston, 2000 M. Div., The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2007 MINISTERIAL College Minister, Central Baptist Church, College Station, Texas, 20012004 Pastor, Clifton Baptist Church, Louisville, Kentucky, 2010ACADEMIC Instructor of Theology, Boyce College, 2012Teaching and Research Fellow, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2005ORGANIZATIONAL Evangelical Theological Society

61 citations

30 May 2013
TL;DR: Schrock as discussed by the authors argues that a biblical theology of the priestly mediation of the new covenant is necessary for understanding the extent of the atonement and that such a study will result in a clear affirmation of definite atonement.
Abstract: A BIBLICAL-THEOLOGICAL INVESTIGATION OF CHRIST’S PRIESTHOOD AND COVENANT MEDIATION WITH RESPECT TO THE EXTENT OF THE ATONEMENT David Stephen Schrock The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2013 Chair: Dr. Stephen J. Wellum This dissertation argues that a biblical theology of the priestly mediation of the new covenant is necessary for understanding the extent of the atonement and that such a study will result in a clear affirmation of definite atonement. Chapter 1 shows how theologians have truncated Christ’s priestly office and how biblical scholars have neglected to apply the priesthood to matters of the atonement’s efficacy and extent. This chapter validates the need for a whole Bible typology of the priestly work of Christ. Chapter 2 proposes an approach to typology that sets forth the methodological commitments of this dissertation. It argues that typology should be prospective in its orientation, Christotelic in its aim, and covenantal in its structure. It explains these three facets at length, helping the reader to understand how the dissertation uses typology. Chapter 3 introduces the priestly prototype in the person and work of Adam. Next, it asserts that Noah and Abraham functions as priestly types when they offer sacrifice, mediate covenants, and offer blessings. With each type, theological reflections are given in conversation with the New Testament fulfillment of Adam, Noah, and Abraham. Chapter 4 examines the legislation of the priesthood. It asserts that three functions of the priesthood emerge in the Law of Moses: The priest is (1) a Kohen Victor, who defends the holiness of God’s sanctuary, (2) a Kohen Mediator, who offers sacrifice for atonement, and a (3) Kohen Teacher, who teaches the covenant community the torah of God. This threefold orientation provides the authorized “mold” (Vorbild) by which the priestly type (Nachbild) can be formed and evaluated. Chapter 5 argues that the prophets condemned the Levitical priests for their disobedience to God’s law and their failure to fulfill their assigned duties (guarding, sacrificing, and teaching). The prophets’ criticisms function in this dissertation as an inspired rubric for evaluating theological proposals for Christ’s priesthood and the atonement. In particular, this chapter argues that general atonement does not match the stipulations of the priesthood, and is therefore liable to prophetic censure. Chapter 6 outlines the priestly expectations of the Former and Latter Prophets. It suggests that the eschatological priest is a royal figure from the line of David who defends God’s holiness (Kohen Victor), sacrifices himself for his people (Kohen Mediator), and instructs the covenant community with absolute efficacy (Kohen Teacher). On the basis of these prophetic anticipations, this chapter argues that the priest of the new covenant will provide a definite and particular atonement. Chapter 7 shows from the New Testament how Christ Jesus fulfills all of the Old Testament promises in regards to the priesthood. Specifically, it demonstrates the threefold ministry of Christ—Kohen Victor, Kohen Mediator, and Kohen Teacher. Following the chronological development of Christ’s priestly ministry (i.e., on earth, on the cross, in heaven), it will argue that the atonement’s extent must be particular and definite, not general and indefinite. Chapter 8 summarizes the biblical theological data espoused in chapters 3 to 7. It applies the priesthood to five areas of systematic theology (i.e., theological hermeneutics, the extent of the atonement, the person of Christ, the universal offer of the gospel, and reconciliation of the cosmos). It concludes with an appeal for holding definite atonement on the basis of Christ’s priesthood. In addition, it suggests various avenues for doing future research on the priesthood of Christ.

59 citations

Eric W. Baker1
01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: The ESCHATOLOGICAL ROLE OF the JERUSALEM TEMPLE: An EXAMINATION of JEWISH WRITINGS DATING from 586 BCE to 70 CE.
Abstract: THE ESCHATOLOGICAL ROLE OF THE JERUSALEM TEMPLE: AN EXAMINATION OF JEWISH WRITINGS DATING FROM 586 BCE TO 70 CE

58 citations

01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: The NATURE, FUNCTION, AND PURPOSE of the TERM biK C in the TORAH, PROPHETS, AND WRITINGS as mentioned in this paper was discussed in detail.
Abstract: THE NATURE, FUNCTION, AND PURPOSE OF THE TERM biK C IN THE TORAH, PROPHETS, AND WRITINGS

54 citations