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Psalms 51-100

19 Mar 1991-
TL;DR: The middle section of the Hebrew Psalter has long been regarded as an inspiring anthology of ancient religious poetry as discussed by the authors, and a careful reading of Psalms 51-100 will stimulate a deeper appreciation for this religious poetry while augmenting the value of personal Bible study.
Abstract: The middle section of the Hebrew Psalter has long been regarded as an inspiring anthology of ancient religious poetry. Within this part of the Sepher Tehillim or Book of Praises, are 11 of the 12 psalms of Asaph (73-83), one of Solomon's two (72), the sole offerings of Ethan (89) and Moses (90), and four of the songs ascribed to the sons of Korah-not to mention the many assigned to David. Dr. Marvin Tate's distinctive commentary traces all the biographical, historical, literary, and practical concepts of these middle psalms and demonstrates how the purpose of each one unfolds. Psalms 51-100, Volume 20 of the Word Biblical Commentary series, furnishes readers with a wealth of information: a thorough, up-to-date bibliography preceding each psalm the author's fresh translation of the Hebrew text Form/Structure/Setting notes which expand the translation extensive comments on the text explanations of the pertinent observations of the author Dr. Tate has also attempted to present various views of passages in which differences of opinion exist. This work, the middle commentary of Word Biblical Commentary's three-volume study of the Psalter, mirrors the opposing emotions so often evident in life: sorrow-joy, love-hate, and faith-fear. A careful reading of Psalms 51-100 will stimulate a deeper appreciation for this religious poetry while augmenting the value of personal Bible study.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors argue that the placement of v. 20 in Psalm 72 has long puzzled scholars and have raised a number of questions: Why y is תפלה used? Why does the verse state that the prayers of David are ended? Where does this leave Solomon (v. 1)? And why is the verse placed after the doxology of vv. 18-19?
Abstract: The placement of v. 20 in Psalm 72 has long puzzled scholars and has raised a number of questions: Why y is תפלה used? Why does the verse state that the prayers of David are ended? Where does this leave Solomon (v. 1)? Why is the verse placed after the doxology of vv. 18–19? And why is it found in the middle of the Elohistic Psalter? To solve these problems, a number of suggestions have been offered, none of which is entirely convincing. In this article, I suggest a solution based on insights gained from research on scribal habits and material culture. Departing from scholars such as Harry Y. Gamble, William A. Johnson, and Emanuel Tov, I argue that Ps 72:20 is likely not the conclusion of a collection but a frozen scribal colophon, originally intended to “close” a scroll. A possible analogy to such a fixation of a colophon is found in the Sumerian Temple Hymns.

2 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: Psalm 53 is an adapted version of Ps 14, crafted to fit in among a cluster of psalms consisting of Pss 52-55 as mentioned in this paper, and it is argued that various contexts have to be taken into consideration for a full understanding of Ps 53.
Abstract: Psalm 53 is an adapted version of Ps 14, crafted to fit in among a cluster of psalms consisting of Pss 52–55. Each of these psalms is described in their respective headings as a “Maskil,” while Pss 52 and 54 each also have a biographical link to the time of persecution of David by Saul. It is argued that various contexts have to be taken into consideration for a full understanding of Ps 53: the differences between Pss 14 and 53; Ps 53’s links to the cluster of Pss 52–55; the connections it has with Proverbs, and the connections it has with the history of David in 1 Samuel via the two biographical notes in the cluster which seem to apply to it as well. When all these contexts are taken into consideration, Ps 53 appears to be an explication of certain texts in Proverbs, as if applying the truths of wisdom teaching to the experiences of David. A INTRODUCTION

2 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a text-critical analysis of the psalm was performed and it was shown that the first stage consists of a Josian oracle in vv. 3-7, 11-14, and the second stage consisted of the early-sixth-century communal lament that was built around this oracle.
Abstract: Psalm 60 exhibits two conflicting literary structures. One of these structures is evident by the psalm's use of chiasmus; the other is evident by the psalm's use of meter. The identification of these two conflicting structures indicates a two-stage composition of Ps 60. Examination of the chiasmus within the psalm and a consideration of its two-stage composition elucidate the date of Ps 60. While most scholars date Ps 60 to sometime between the late eighth century and early sixth century BCE, careful observation of the psalm's structure and political references indicates that the two-stage composition of Ps 60 dates to the Hasmonean and Herodian periods. Building on a second- and first-century BCE date for the two-stage composition of the psalm, a text-critical analysis of the psalm indicates that the Greek version of the psalm reflects a Hebrew Vorlage that predates the MT version of the psalm. Consequently, proto-MT Ps 60 seems to date to the end of the first century CE.craig evan andersoncraigevananderson@gmail.comAzusa Pacific University, Azusa, CA 91702Psalm 60 is one of the most politically oriented psalms in the Hebrew Bible.1 In order to understand the psalm properly, therefore, it is crucial to identify effectively the psalm's historical context.2 Despite ample scholarly investigation, however, the historical context of Ps 60 has remained elusive. For the past two centuries, scholars have proposed a range of dates for the psalm that spans nearly a millennium. In the nineteenth century and the early twentieth century, many scholars argued for a date as late as the Hasmonean period.3 Yet other scholars have dated it to as early as the time of David or Solomon.4Since the publication of an article on Ps 60 by Ulrich Kellermann in 1978 and, furthermore, since the publication of Hans-Joachim Kraus's commentary on the Psalms, which was instrumental in popularizing Kellermann's argument, scholars have formed a loose consensus dating the psalm to the last few years of Jerusalem before the Babylonian destruction of the city in 587 BCE.5 Kellermann's argument on behalf of this date rests largely on the confluence of two historical phenomena to which Kellermann believes Ps 60:6, 11 refer. Kellermann interprets ... in v. 6 as a reference to archers representative of "die Gefahr aus dem Norden," and he understands v. 11 as indicative of a time of military conflict between Judah and Edom.6 On the basis of this observation, Kellermann notices that the one time that Judah faced invasion from a northern enemy while simultaneously standing in conflict with Edom was during the Babylonian invasion at the beginning of the sixth century BCE. Historically, it seems likely that Edom opportunistically capitalized on Judah's weakened state during the Babylonian invasion by launching incursions into Judean territory.7Following the publication of Kellermann's article, commentaries on the Psalms and articles on Ps 60 have followed suit, routinely dating Ps 60 to the fall of Jerusalem at the beginning of the sixth century BCE.8 Most scholars see a two-stage composition for Ps 60.9 The first stage consists of a Josian oracle in vv. 8-10.10 The second stage consists of the early-sixth-century communal lament that was built around this oracle in vv. 3-7, 11-14.Yet, despite the consensus that has formed around an early-sixth-century date for Ps 60, there are some major problems with this date, which, I believe, ultimately originate from a form-critical misreading of the psalm. Consequently, before I can directly address the problem of dating the psalm and propose an alternative to this date, a form-critical analysis of Ps 60 is in order.I. Form-Critical Analysis of Psalm 60Scholars almost unanimously affirm that Ps 60:3-14 features a tripartite structure. One of the clearest indications of this is the meter that the psalm employs: vv. 3-7 and 11-14 are arranged as bicola, while vv. 8-10 feature tricola. …

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The original version of Psalm 78 was written in the northern kingdom of Judah and its original purpose is not known, but its topic is clear: God's continued benevolence to the people of Israel despite their disobedience and disloyalty.
Abstract: Abstract:The original version of Psalm 78 was written in the northern kingdom. Its original purpose is not known, but its topic is clear: God's continued benevolence to the people of Israel despite their disobedience and disloyalty. During the reign of King Zedekiah of Judah (597–586 b.c.e.), there was, on one side, a faction that advocated rebelling against the Babylonians and, on the other side, people such as the prophet Jeremiah who argued against rebelling. A member of the former faction (the redactor of Psalm 78) took it upon himself to write a document that would support his side. The basis of the new document was the original version of Psalm 78, which was widely known in Judah. The redaction included additions and alterations on a very small scale (vv. 4a and 9-10 were added, and vv. 67-71 were altered). Two methods were used in the redaction: (1) working from the outside inward, and (2) détournement. The secondary purpose of the redaction was to explain v. 57b, which the redactor did not understand.

1 citations