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Psalms 51-100

19 Mar 1991-
TL;DR: The middle section of the Hebrew Psalter has long been regarded as an inspiring anthology of ancient religious poetry as discussed by the authors, and a careful reading of Psalms 51-100 will stimulate a deeper appreciation for this religious poetry while augmenting the value of personal Bible study.
Abstract: The middle section of the Hebrew Psalter has long been regarded as an inspiring anthology of ancient religious poetry. Within this part of the Sepher Tehillim or Book of Praises, are 11 of the 12 psalms of Asaph (73-83), one of Solomon's two (72), the sole offerings of Ethan (89) and Moses (90), and four of the songs ascribed to the sons of Korah-not to mention the many assigned to David. Dr. Marvin Tate's distinctive commentary traces all the biographical, historical, literary, and practical concepts of these middle psalms and demonstrates how the purpose of each one unfolds. Psalms 51-100, Volume 20 of the Word Biblical Commentary series, furnishes readers with a wealth of information: a thorough, up-to-date bibliography preceding each psalm the author's fresh translation of the Hebrew text Form/Structure/Setting notes which expand the translation extensive comments on the text explanations of the pertinent observations of the author Dr. Tate has also attempted to present various views of passages in which differences of opinion exist. This work, the middle commentary of Word Biblical Commentary's three-volume study of the Psalter, mirrors the opposing emotions so often evident in life: sorrow-joy, love-hate, and faith-fear. A careful reading of Psalms 51-100 will stimulate a deeper appreciation for this religious poetry while augmenting the value of personal Bible study.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper explored unique features of 2 Sam 23:1-7 that set it apart from the conceptual framework of Samuel-Kings and reflect a later development in the Davidic traditions, including the concept of David the prophet and the link between David and the God of Jacob.
Abstract: Abstract:Building on earlier studies of 2 Sam 23:1–7, I explore unique features of the poem that set it apart from the conceptual framework of Samuel–Kings and reflect a later development in the Davidic traditions. My primary foci are the concept of David the prophet (vv. 1–2) and the link between David and the God of Jacob (vv. 1 and 3), as well as the description of the just and perhaps unidentified ruler (vv. 3–7) and the panorama of divine names throughout. The poem represents the earliest witness to the development of David’s prophetic image in early Judaism and Christianity. Yet the poetry does not merely demonstrate independence and innovation; rather, it draws deeply from earlier traditions, including the Balaam material and imagery from the Prophets and the Psalms. This analysis furthers earlier proposals that, before its inclusion in the appendix of 2 Samuel, the likely context for “David’s last words” was the Psalms.

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2020
TL;DR: The analysis of Psalm 90:12 as mentioned in this paper is an attempt to respond to the question: "How man can receive this knowledge?" The analysis focuses particularly on the literary structure of the psalm 90 because, by coming to a better understanding of the way in which the sections and respective elements of the poem relate to each other, one can arrive at the deeper meaning.
Abstract: The request for wisdom of heart that can be found in Psalm 90:12 conveys in a certain sense the essence of the spiritual search on which that the authors of the Old Testament Wisdom Books embarked. In the end, they arrived at the conclusion that true knowledge can be attained only as a gift from the Creator. The question that remains, however, is: how man can receive this knowledge? The analysis of Psalm 90 presented below is an attempt to respond to this question. This analysis focuses particularly on the literary structure of Psalm 90 because, by coming to a better understanding of the way in which the sections and respective elements of the poem relate to each other, one arrives at the psalm’s deeper meaning. In this regard, the psychologist Hubert Hermans’ valuation theory is particularly helpful.

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2006-Thomist
TL;DR: Theology of disclosure as mentioned in this paper is a program for what he calls ''the theology of disclosure'' which appropriates principles from Husserlian phenomenology to examine the appearances and modes of manifestation proper to sacred realities by which they are made known.
Abstract: I N HIS THEOLOGICAL WRITINGS, Robert Sokolowski articulates a program for what he calls \"the theology of disclosure. \"1 This way of doing theology appropriates principles from Husserlian phenomenology to examine the appearances and modes of manifestation proper to sacred realities by which they are made known. 2 Up till now, Sokolowski's theological contribution has received most attention from philosophers of religion and theologians who are concerned with the doctrine of God or human morality. 3 Even though Sokolowski devotes chapters in his books The God of Faith and Reason and

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The way in which Psalms 74 and 77 deal with historical turmoil in the psalmists' lives is to weave together reflections on the concrete problems being experienced with succinct myths about God's precreative struggle with chaos: Chaoskampfe as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: The way in which Psalms 74 and 77 deal with historical turmoil in the psalmists’ lives is to weave together reflections on the concrete problems being experienced with succinct myths about God’s precreative struggle with chaos: Chaoskampfe. The cultural intertextural background for these myths is to be found in Near Eastern accounts about the divine battle against chaotic sea gods. Each psalmist tailors this component in ways that fit the theodicy and the basis of appeal for divine intervention in their own lives that they are attempting to construct. In the interplays of these overarching constructions and the roles of the Chaoskampfe in them the larger functions of the precreative discourses in these psalms are to be found.

1 citations