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Psalms 51-100

19 Mar 1991-
TL;DR: The middle section of the Hebrew Psalter has long been regarded as an inspiring anthology of ancient religious poetry as discussed by the authors, and a careful reading of Psalms 51-100 will stimulate a deeper appreciation for this religious poetry while augmenting the value of personal Bible study.
Abstract: The middle section of the Hebrew Psalter has long been regarded as an inspiring anthology of ancient religious poetry. Within this part of the Sepher Tehillim or Book of Praises, are 11 of the 12 psalms of Asaph (73-83), one of Solomon's two (72), the sole offerings of Ethan (89) and Moses (90), and four of the songs ascribed to the sons of Korah-not to mention the many assigned to David. Dr. Marvin Tate's distinctive commentary traces all the biographical, historical, literary, and practical concepts of these middle psalms and demonstrates how the purpose of each one unfolds. Psalms 51-100, Volume 20 of the Word Biblical Commentary series, furnishes readers with a wealth of information: a thorough, up-to-date bibliography preceding each psalm the author's fresh translation of the Hebrew text Form/Structure/Setting notes which expand the translation extensive comments on the text explanations of the pertinent observations of the author Dr. Tate has also attempted to present various views of passages in which differences of opinion exist. This work, the middle commentary of Word Biblical Commentary's three-volume study of the Psalter, mirrors the opposing emotions so often evident in life: sorrow-joy, love-hate, and faith-fear. A careful reading of Psalms 51-100 will stimulate a deeper appreciation for this religious poetry while augmenting the value of personal Bible study.
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: Wilson as discussed by the authors pointed out that the psalms at the seams of the books are theologically significant, and argued that theologians should pay more attention to the intentional placement of these Psalms (Pss 1-2, 41-42, 72-73, 89-90, 106-107 and 144-145).
Abstract: Recent Psalm studies have rightly moved away from overlooking the intentional order of the final form of the Psalter to studying its theological significance. 1 Wilson in particular argues that the fourth and fifth Books (Pss 90-106; 107-145) respond to the problem raised by the first three books (Pss 2-89). 2 These first three books point out the collapse of the Davidic covenant while the last two books provide an answer from the perspective of wisdom. Wilson points out that the psalms at the seams of the books are theologically significant. Therefore, theologians should pay more attention to the intentional placement of these psalms (Pss 1-2, 41-42, 72-73, 89-90, 106-107 and 144-145). 3 He adds that Psalm 2 is the foundation of Davidic Zion theology, Psalm 72 is a pointer that the promises to David are transferred to his descendants, and Psalm 89 is a lament that bemoans the failure of the traditional Davidic theology. Then he affirms that Psalms 1, 90, 107, and 145, provide a frame in which the sages answer the challenge raised by the first three books. These wisdom Psalms frame the royal Psalms (Psalms 2, 72, 89, and 144) providing a relecture in which the final composition points out that God is the true and lasting King recalling the foundational pre-monarchical faith of Israel and directing the faithful to trust in Yahweh as King, rather than in fragile and failing human princes.
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The identity of the enemies in psalms has been a perennial focus in scholarship as discussed by the authors , focusing on the way the description of enemies emphasizes important aspects of Judean corporate identity in the aftermath of the destruction of the Temple in 586 BCE.
Abstract: The identity of the enemies in psalms has been a perennial focus in scholarship. The pervasive language and shifting perspectives of psalms has led to a variety of proposals, though only a handful of scholars have focused on the positive function of the role of enemies for the development of identity. The language of enmity and function of enemy images in Ps. 74 are explained by means of social identity theory, focusing on the way the description of the enemies emphasizes important aspects of Judean corporate identity in the aftermath of the destruction of the Temple in 586 BCE.
Journal Article
TL;DR: This article examined the use of the Psalms within the Hebrew Psalms, where intratextual lexical recursion arguably indicates instances of formulaic expression, allusion, rewriting, and even quotation.
Abstract: This article examines the use of the Psalms within the Psalms, where intratextual lexical recursion arguably indicates instances of formulaic expression, allusion, rewriting, and even quotation. Several examples from the Hebrew (MT) Psalms illustrate this phenomenon with comparisons from two ancient Jewish translations, the Septuagint and Psalm Targum. From the few examples examined in this article, the translations do not appear to replicate the same intratextual references as those of the MT. Evidence for intentional intratextual connections in the Psalms warrants a more systematic investigation, as this has implications for both form-critical assumptions and studies concerned with the final form of the text.
TL;DR: In this article , the theory and language of (inter)corporeality, enkinaesthesia, and other corporeal-related nomenclatures are employed to depict the doctrine of the communion of saints as experienced through their shared cognitive, affective, conative, and somatic sensing and consciousness.
Abstract: : Employing the theories and language of (inter)corporeality, enkinaesthesia, and other corporeal-related nomenclatures, Psalm 84 programmatically depicts the doctrine of the communion of saints as experienced through their shared cognitive, affective, conative, and somatic sensing and consciousness. A corporeal-sensitive reading of the psalm surfac-es two related, embodied, prelinguistic experiences. Specifically, the communion of saints is experienced as finding and being “at home,” feeling a sense of safety and provision that is contrary to the stimuli of dangers and threats the psalmist’s body experiences outside the house of the Lord. Also, the communion of saints is experienced when camaraderie, or in Victor Turner’s term communitas, is generated from the tactile proprioceptive intersensory entanglement shared by saints as they make the arduous pilgrimage trek to the house of the Lord. These two expressions of the communion of saints are primarily felt and experienced (inter)corporeally rather than merely seen or heard. These latter two senses are most privi leged in the virtual space practice of communion of saints.