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Psalms 51-100

19 Mar 1991-
TL;DR: The middle section of the Hebrew Psalter has long been regarded as an inspiring anthology of ancient religious poetry as discussed by the authors, and a careful reading of Psalms 51-100 will stimulate a deeper appreciation for this religious poetry while augmenting the value of personal Bible study.
Abstract: The middle section of the Hebrew Psalter has long been regarded as an inspiring anthology of ancient religious poetry. Within this part of the Sepher Tehillim or Book of Praises, are 11 of the 12 psalms of Asaph (73-83), one of Solomon's two (72), the sole offerings of Ethan (89) and Moses (90), and four of the songs ascribed to the sons of Korah-not to mention the many assigned to David. Dr. Marvin Tate's distinctive commentary traces all the biographical, historical, literary, and practical concepts of these middle psalms and demonstrates how the purpose of each one unfolds. Psalms 51-100, Volume 20 of the Word Biblical Commentary series, furnishes readers with a wealth of information: a thorough, up-to-date bibliography preceding each psalm the author's fresh translation of the Hebrew text Form/Structure/Setting notes which expand the translation extensive comments on the text explanations of the pertinent observations of the author Dr. Tate has also attempted to present various views of passages in which differences of opinion exist. This work, the middle commentary of Word Biblical Commentary's three-volume study of the Psalter, mirrors the opposing emotions so often evident in life: sorrow-joy, love-hate, and faith-fear. A careful reading of Psalms 51-100 will stimulate a deeper appreciation for this religious poetry while augmenting the value of personal Bible study.
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TL;DR: In this article , the authors argue that the Asaph psalms grew out of two contexts of crisis: the Assyrian invasion and Babylonian exile, and utilize a Social Identity Approach to analyze the function of Asaphite psalm in shaping group identity.
Abstract: emphases have been explained in various ways. This paper argues that the Asaph psalms grew out of two contexts of crisis: the Assyrian invasion and Babylonian exile. With these contexts in mind, this paper utilizes a Social Identity Approach to analyze the function of the Asaphite psalms in shaping group identity in light of traumatic events.
14 Nov 2013
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors investigate the occurrence of the term sadday, which is generally translated by the term Almighty, in connection with the word sad, whose basic meaning is breast.
Abstract: lthough it is clear the notion that God usually shows up in the Bible from the figure of a father who takes care of their children, there is room in biblical literature to explore the image of God from the mother figure. Thus, this study aims to determine how such an image is constructed by investigating the occurrence of the term sadday, which is generally translated by the term Almighty, in connection with the term sad, whose basic meaning is breast. Some commentators have pointed out the semantic relatedness of these two words in an attempt to show that they contribute to an understanding of Imago Dei that also involves female characteristics.
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper worked through the Hebrew and proposed a suitable alternative to traditional renderings, one that is sensitive to the immediate narrative context and to the broader biblical record, which can lead to corrected translations and the intentional elimination of any sacred justification for this stigmatization.
Abstract: God made an incredible promise to Hagar in Gen 16.12; however, the beauty of the promise gets lost in translation. Our English Bibles typically render this promise in a pejorative manner, which has led to centuries of stigmatizing Arabs, primarily Muslim Arabs. The polyvalence of the Hebrew in the verse opens the door for significantly different renderings of God’s promise. Thus, the assumptions translators bring to the text can easily shape their understandings. This paper works through the Hebrew and proposes a suitable alternative to traditional renderings, one that is sensitive to the immediate narrative context and to the broader biblical record. Fresh reflection on this verse can lead to corrected translations and the intentional elimination of any sacred justification for this stigmatization.
01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: The authors discusses the diff erent points of view in modern scholarship on the theme and attempts to determine which view carries most weight; taking into account the possible Old Testament texts alluded to in the song.
Abstract: Th e so-called “Song of Moses” in Revelation 15 is a song of which its Old Testament background is highly debated in modern scholarship. Th ere is, however, no disagreement on the fact that the song does contain lots of Old Testament themes. Th is paper aims to discuss one of these themes that appear to be present in the song namely the theme of universal deliverance. Th e paper discusses the diff erent points of view in modern scholarship on the theme and attempts to determine which view carries most weight; taking into account the possible Old Testament texts alluded to in the song.