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Psalms 51-100

19 Mar 1991-
TL;DR: The middle section of the Hebrew Psalter has long been regarded as an inspiring anthology of ancient religious poetry as discussed by the authors, and a careful reading of Psalms 51-100 will stimulate a deeper appreciation for this religious poetry while augmenting the value of personal Bible study.
Abstract: The middle section of the Hebrew Psalter has long been regarded as an inspiring anthology of ancient religious poetry. Within this part of the Sepher Tehillim or Book of Praises, are 11 of the 12 psalms of Asaph (73-83), one of Solomon's two (72), the sole offerings of Ethan (89) and Moses (90), and four of the songs ascribed to the sons of Korah-not to mention the many assigned to David. Dr. Marvin Tate's distinctive commentary traces all the biographical, historical, literary, and practical concepts of these middle psalms and demonstrates how the purpose of each one unfolds. Psalms 51-100, Volume 20 of the Word Biblical Commentary series, furnishes readers with a wealth of information: a thorough, up-to-date bibliography preceding each psalm the author's fresh translation of the Hebrew text Form/Structure/Setting notes which expand the translation extensive comments on the text explanations of the pertinent observations of the author Dr. Tate has also attempted to present various views of passages in which differences of opinion exist. This work, the middle commentary of Word Biblical Commentary's three-volume study of the Psalter, mirrors the opposing emotions so often evident in life: sorrow-joy, love-hate, and faith-fear. A careful reading of Psalms 51-100 will stimulate a deeper appreciation for this religious poetry while augmenting the value of personal Bible study.
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08 May 2020
Abstract: ............................................................................................................... 3 Acknowledgements .............................................................................................. 6

54 citations

Dissertation
09 Aug 2016
TL;DR: The relationship between verbs of motion and emotion and the language of death in the Psalms is investigated in this paper, where it is shown that motion vocabulary in the psalms is often found in the vicinity of emotion words.
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to determine what relationship, if any, exists between the verbs of motion and emotion and the language of death in the Psalms Such motionemotion verbal pair we describe as motion-emotion axis This will endorse that motion vocabulary in the Psalter is often found in the vicinity of emotion words The principal premise of this thesis is that death is one of the chief motifs in the Psalter, while we distinguish between the idea of motif and that of a theme Subsequently we maintain that death motif is underlined by thanatophobic emotional predicaments of the psalmist The following questions and issues arise in the examinations of this work One of the important investigations is exploring some of the key issues in psalmodic studies, particularly in relation to the inquiries of the identity of the psalmist as a private individual; and that in the context of his personal experience of distress, in face of death threats This will be some kind of referential points, as we develop our central thesis objectives Secondly, we will investigate questions and issues of religious language and prayer as one of the focal points in expressions of the psalmist’s experience and emotions Thirdly, an ever-present and an intriguing question of the psalmist’s sudden mood changes, which often appear within a single Psalm, can hardly be avoid, and this issue will be followed up throughout the dissertation Fourthly and finally, the central subject we examine here is motion as a concept relative to motional vocabulary and how it relates to the psalmist’s experiential and emotional dimension The end of the thesis is broader examination of the realms of death and incorporates four aspects of death in biblical context (grave, silence, name, dust and depths) The plan of investigation begins with describing the thesis objectives with the scope of psalmodic texts; giving an overview of previous studies, particularly of Form-critical traditions This follows with surveying relevant psalmodic texts, in accordance to the following general criteria we ought to: (1) pay attention to thanatophobic motifs in the Psalter, observing the fact that death motif in the Psalter is associated with not only the lamental and complaint Psalms, as one might expect, (2) examine the relationship in the motion-emotion axis in the psalmist’s experience of the spatial dimension (motion in conceptual space, heaven-Sheol) The following general conclusions and contributions are indicated The verbs of motion in general, are very sparsely investigated in the biblical literature, hardly at all in the context of the Psalms; and not at all as the motion-emotion axis in the thanatophobic experiences of the psalmist The work has shown that in literary and linguistic terms (grammar of death) there is an exceptional presence of motional vocabulary and phraseology associated with the Psalmist's emotional turmoils in thanatophobic situations The last chapter is assigned to examine five suggested realms of death in bibliucal texts which are most commonly found (grave, silence, name, dust and depths)

46 citations

01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: Gabrielson as discussed by the authors argued that it is hard to explain Paul's interest in the comparison and the rhetoric of Romans without the presence of underlying Adamic traditions, and he proposed a construct called "participatory domains" wherein a single figure, a heavenly or earthly patron, rules over a people and their destinies are intertwined.
Abstract: PRIMEVAL HISTORY ACCORDING TO PAUL: “IN ADAM” AND “IN CHRIST” IN ROMANS Timothy A. Gabrielson, B.S., B.S., M.A. Marquette University, 2016 Paul’s comparison of Adam and Christ in Rom 5:12–21 is among the most influential doctrines in the Bible and Christian theology. Often it has been used to summarize God’s purposes in creation and redemption, from humanity’s “fall” in Adam to its restoration in Christ. In the past several decades, however, it has increasingly been seen as provisional and functional because the Jewish writings used to support it have now been dated after the apostle’s lifetime. This study retrieves the traditional position, but does so by appeal to different corpora of Jewish texts, those that are prior or contemporary to Paul. After considering the most prominent interpretations of Rom 5 over the past century, and the increasing questions surrounding it, I argue that it is hard to explain Paul’s interest in the comparison and the rhetoric of Romans without the presence of underlying Adamic traditions. Turning to Greco-Roman Jewish thought about primeval history, I organize the traditions into a fivefold taxonomy: Adam as (1) the head of humanity, a (2) paradigmatic pattern and (3) moral warning, as well as a (4) bearer of disaster and (5) glorious figure. Of these, the first, fourth, and fifth are relevant for Rom 5. To combine these three, I propose a construct called “participatory domains” wherein a single figure, a heavenly or earthly patron, rules over a people and their destinies are intertwined. I then apply this construct to Romans, particularly the Adam-Christ typology, to demonstrate that it solves longstanding riddles within the text and provides a cohesive account of the letter as a whole. Insofar as the proposal is satisfactory, it holds a number of consequences for Christian theology and Pauline studies.

44 citations

DOI
27 Nov 2017
TL;DR: Kim as discussed by the authors argues that the most plausible candidate for the spiritual visitor in Eliphaz's vision (4:12-21) is Satan, who not only afflicts Job in the prologue (1:1-2:10), but also exerts his influence in the speeches of the friends and Elihu.
Abstract: THE IDENTITY OF THE SPIRIT (ַ חוּר) IN ELIPHAZ’S VISION (JOB 4:12-21) AND ITS SIGNIFICANCE FOR UNDERSTANDING THE BOOK OF JOB Sungjin Kim, Ph.D. The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2017 Chair: Dr. Duane A. Garrett This monograph argues that the most plausible candidate for the spiritual visitor in Eliphaz’s vision (4:12-21) is Satan, who not only afflicts Job in the prologue (1:1-2:10), but also exerts his influence in the speeches of the friends and Elihu. Satan’s message (4:17-21) functions as a central premise of the speeches of the friends and Elihu, leading to a false denunciation of Job as a sinner. Eliphaz (15:14-16) as well as Zophar (20:2-8), Bildad (25:4-6), Elihu (33:15-17, 19-21, 23-28; 34:7; 36:10, 15) continually rely on the vision’s authority and message in their counsel to Job. As a result, Job remains innocent throughout the dialogues, and his integrity is further confirmed as God in a theophany reveals to him the real cause of his suffering and God’s resolution to the problem of evil (chs. 38-41). In addition, Satan’s prominent role in the book, coupled with the innocent sufferer theme, makes the book apocalyptic wisdom literature. Satan’s challenge in the prologue and his malicious influence throughout finally meet an apocalyptic climax as Satan reappears on the scene as the serpent Leviathan, upon whom God pronounces his ultimate punishment. Job, on the other hand, finds consolation (42:6) and vindication in God (42:7), and finally enters God’s restoration and bliss (42:10-17). The book thus is organically connected as a literary whole with a coherent message about the righteous sufferer and the apocalyptic resolution to the problem of evil.

43 citations