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Psalms 51-100

19 Mar 1991-
TL;DR: The middle section of the Hebrew Psalter has long been regarded as an inspiring anthology of ancient religious poetry as discussed by the authors, and a careful reading of Psalms 51-100 will stimulate a deeper appreciation for this religious poetry while augmenting the value of personal Bible study.
Abstract: The middle section of the Hebrew Psalter has long been regarded as an inspiring anthology of ancient religious poetry. Within this part of the Sepher Tehillim or Book of Praises, are 11 of the 12 psalms of Asaph (73-83), one of Solomon's two (72), the sole offerings of Ethan (89) and Moses (90), and four of the songs ascribed to the sons of Korah-not to mention the many assigned to David. Dr. Marvin Tate's distinctive commentary traces all the biographical, historical, literary, and practical concepts of these middle psalms and demonstrates how the purpose of each one unfolds. Psalms 51-100, Volume 20 of the Word Biblical Commentary series, furnishes readers with a wealth of information: a thorough, up-to-date bibliography preceding each psalm the author's fresh translation of the Hebrew text Form/Structure/Setting notes which expand the translation extensive comments on the text explanations of the pertinent observations of the author Dr. Tate has also attempted to present various views of passages in which differences of opinion exist. This work, the middle commentary of Word Biblical Commentary's three-volume study of the Psalter, mirrors the opposing emotions so often evident in life: sorrow-joy, love-hate, and faith-fear. A careful reading of Psalms 51-100 will stimulate a deeper appreciation for this religious poetry while augmenting the value of personal Bible study.
Citations
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31 Mar 2015
TL;DR: Zaman as mentioned in this paper presented the purpose, goals, and rationale for this project, and analyzed the entire project by evaluating the attainment of purpose and goals and by extending theological and personal reflections, concluding that the project’s purpose was accomplished and all the projects goals were attained.
Abstract: TEACHING THE BIBLE’S STORYLINE AT GRACE BIBLE CHURCH, MIDLOTHIAN, VIRGINIA Richard Andrew Zaman, D.Min. The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2014 Faculty Supervisor: Dr. Robert L. Plummer This project taught the Bible’s redemptive-historical storyline to members of an adult discipleship class at Grace Bible Church in Midlothian, Virginia. The first chapter presents the purpose, goals, and rationale for this project. Chapter 2 argues that the Scripture’s main storyline traces the promise of redemption to its fulfillment in Jesus Christ. Chapter 3 contends that an outline of the Bible’s storyline structured by the major biblical covenants (i.e., Abrahamic, Mosaic, Davidic, and New) better maintains the tension of continuity and discontinuity found within the Bible than do the outlines offered by traditional, Dispensational and Covenant theologians. The fourth chapter recounts the events and procedures from each week of the fifteen-week project. Chapter 5 analyzes the entire project by evaluating the attainment of purpose and goals and by extending theological and personal reflections. The analysis documents that the project’s purpose was accomplished and all the projects goals were attained.

20 citations

16 May 2014
TL;DR: In this paper, the inheritance in the Pauline epistles is examined and the authors argue that typology and intertextuality are significant for interpreting inheritance in Paul's epistles.
Abstract: Chapter 1 introduces the need for an updated study on the inheritance in the Pauline epistles, examines the history of research on this topic, and states the thesis of this dissertation. Then it explains the method that will be employed to examine the relevant inheritance texts and provides an overview of the dissertation. Chapter 2 argues that typology and intertextuality are significant for interpreting the inheritance in Paul. Thus it explains these hermeneutical concepts before moving on to an analysis of the pertinent texts. Chapter 3 contends that in Genesis to Chronicles the central understanding of the inheritance is the land of Canaan promised to Abraham and his descendants (e.g.Gen 15:3-5, 17:8; 21:10), the territory to which Israel sojourned and established a kingdom. Subsequently, chapter 4 displays that the Psalms and Prophets expand the inheritance to include the eschatological world (e.g., Ps 2; Isa 54, 65-66). When God's people enter their inheritance, David's royal descendent will reign over them forever (Ezek 36-37; cf. Dan 7). Chapter 5 demonstrates that the Second Temple literature, in line with the Psalms and Prophets, expands the inheritance to include the whole world (e.g., Sir 44:21; Jub. 22:14, 32:19). This is the place to which God's people will be resurrected to dwell (e.g., 4 Ezra 7) and over which Messiah will reign (e.g., 1 En. 51:1-5; 1QHa 14:29-31). Chapter 6 argues that Paul's interpretation of the inheritance in Galatians follows that of the Old Testament and Second Temple literature, for he views this theme to be the renewed world (3:15-29; 4:21-31) where God will establish his lasting monarchy (4:1-7). Paul also suggests that the Spirit will see to it that believers receive their future inheritance (4:1-7). Chapter 7 then examines the pertinent passages in Romans and other Pauline texts, confirming the observations about the inheritance in Galatians. Chapter 8 summarizes the findings of each chapter and affirms the thesis of this dissertation.

18 citations

Book
17 Feb 2014
TL;DR: Borchardt as discussed by the authors, The Torah in 1Maccabees (1.308 F. Borchardt, 1998)..., p. 7.1
Abstract: ...............................................................................................................................................308 F. Borchardt, The Torah in 1Maccabees

16 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: In this paper, an intertextual reading of the book of Zephaniah is presented, and the effect of allusions and echo have on the signification of the text is analyzed.
Abstract: The question this thesis answers is, “How does an intertextual reading contribute to interpreting the book of Zephaniah?” To answer this question the thesis examines the ways in which Zephaniah takes up other texts as it constructs its own message. After the introduction, chapters 2 to 4 address the theory of intertextuality, methodological issues in an intertextual reading of the OT in general, and historical-critical aspects of Zephaniah. Exegesis of Zephaniah constitutes the main body of the thesis (chapters 5-7), proceeding one pericope at a time in analysing the effect intertextual allusion and echo have on the signification of the text. This intertextual reading reveals that the first oracle, Zeph 1.2-3, is key to understanding the entire book of Zephaniah. Allusion to the creationflood account in Genesis 1-9 carries into the text of Zephaniah the concept of representation. Just as humanity represented God in the primeval times and humanity’s failure resulted in universal judgment, in Zephaniah the failure of the people of God likewise results in universal judgment. This concept of representation enables the book of Zephaniah to be read as a cohesive text which makes sense from beginning to end. The relationship between Judah and the nations in Zephaniah is a difficulty which has led scholars to emending the text and/or attributing what appear to be logical inconsistencies to redactional adjustments to the original Zephaniah text. An intertextual reading provides a solution to this interpretive impasse. The thesis concludes that an intertextual reading makes a significant contribution to understanding the book of Zephaniah.

15 citations