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Journal ArticleDOI

Publishing in Educational Research Journals: Are Graduate Students Participating?

01 Jan 2013-Journal of Scholarly Publishing (University of Toronto Press)-Vol. 44, Iss: 4, pp 355-372
TL;DR: This article examined the extent to which graduate students are co-authors in these publications and what role this collaboration takes, and discussed the implications for collaboration with and between graduate students in the field of education.
Abstract: Professional collaboration in academia is valued because it is believed to encourage the generation and synthesis of ideas, to enhance workplace environments, and to comprise a key element in mentoring practices. Collaboration in writing is often of two types: formal co-authorship or informal commentary on colleagues’ work. Formal co-authorship is a topic that usually draws more attention for its problems and potential controversies than for its putative benefits. In our study, we examined professional academic co-authorship. Focusing on the field of education, we identified four research sub-fields (general education, educational psychology, language studies, and literacy studies) and analysed academic peer-reviewed journals from each of these sub-fields to establish how much collaboration exists in published articles. We then examined the extent to which graduate students are co-authors in these publications and what role this collaboration takes. Implications for collaboration with and between graduate students are discussed.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This study focused on librarian authors of open access articles in the field of library and information science confirms that librarians engage in increasingly frequent interaction with researchers.

17 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explored the publishing productivity of PhD students in the United States in four social science disciplines: political science, psychology, social work/family science, and sociology.
Abstract: Demonstrating research activity and a productive publishing record is crucial for landing a tenure-track position after graduation. What does it mean, however, to be productive in publishing? How many manuscripts have PhD students who landed tenure-track positions published in recent years? The purpose of this study is to explore publishing productivity of PhD students in the United States in four social science disciplines: political science, psychology, social work/family science, and sociology. Data were collected from the curriculum vitae of 500 scholars currently employed at 108 research institutions in the United States and who finished their doctorate degrees within the last five years (2010–14). We found that PhD students in our sample averaged 4.3 peer-reviewed journal or book chapter publications before graduation. Analysis of the independent disciplines of interest is also presented.

15 citations


Cites background from "Publishing in Educational Research ..."

  • ...A few studies suggest that many students do not seek opportunities, or are not invited by their advisers, to publish.(7) While quantitative data is scant on the number of manuscripts that PhD students publish before graduating with their doctorate degree, some evidence shows that they are publishing very little relative to the high emphasis placed on publishing in academia....

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Journal ArticleDOI
16 Jul 2016
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors investigated strategies employed by universities in Kenya for managing scholarly content and found that most respondents documented research procedures, backed up information, and used printouts to preserve scholarly content; however, they hardly used digital archives and university servers.
Abstract: This study investigated strategies employed by universities in Kenya for managing scholarly content. The study was underpinned by the Conversation Theory and the Knowledge Management Process Model and was based on the post-positivist paradigm. A survey was conducted within a multiple case study design. The population of the study consisted of academic staff, postgraduate students, university librarians and representatives of university research units from six universities in Kenya. Self-administered questionnaires were used to collect data from academic staff and postgraduate students while key informants were interviewed. The results revealed that while the respondents generated theses, journal articles and conference papers, the majority did not participate in knowledge generation in the period from 2010 to 2014. The results further revealed that most respondents documented research procedures, backed up information, and used printouts to preserve scholarly content; however, they hardly used digital archives and university servers. The results suggested heavy reliance on modern technology-enabled communication techniques and faceto- face interactions for communication amongst scholars, whereas institutional repositories (IRs) were hardly used. The results revealed inadequate institutional support for research and scholarly communication including funding, material and physical infrastructure, mentorship, and information and communications technology (ICT) facilities. The study concluded that strategies for managing scholarly content at universities in Kenya are weak, impacting negatively on the quality, quantity and visibility of scholarly content; and that a policy framework encompassing the different facets of managing scholarly content is necessary. The study recommended developing specific strategies and policies to enhance scholarly content management; institutionalising mentorship programmes; increasing funding to strengthen universities' research capacity; and strengthening research niches.

14 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a didactic instructional article presented an original educational approach, directed toward the improvement of existing university curriculum using effective and student-friendly teaching of fundamentals of modern scientific research for graduate and undergraduate students, emphasizing scientometrics and integrity.
Abstract: This didactic instructional article presents an original educational approach, directed toward the improvement of existing university curriculum using effective and student-friendly teaching of fundamentals of modern scientific research for graduate and undergraduate students, emphasizing scientometrics and integrity. This approach applies to students majoring in a wide range of basic and applied academic specializations in the various branches of science, engineering, computation and technology. The present methodological paper provides a novel, humanized and student-centered way of presenting a comprehensive and unified didactic explanation of originally narrated instructional material, which is based on the adaptation, generalization and creative re-thinking of the previous ten years of the author’s publishing experience. This experience has been in Scopus®- and SCIE WoS® Core Collection-indexed referred academic periodicals. The proposed learning material has found a full-scale educational approbation for a widely-targeted audience of full-time young bachelor-, M. Sc.- and Ph. D.-students as well as distant adult students, university faculties, scientific researchers, college instructors and engineering staff.

13 citations


Additional excerpts

  • ...…Belcher, 2009; Stoilescu & McDougall, 2010; Fernsten & Reda, 2011; Pope et al., 2012; Taylor, 2012; Wingate & Tribble, 2012; Bretag et al., 2013; Garbati & Samuels, 2013; Wisker, 2013; Badley, 2014; Lax, 2014; Thompson, 2014; White-Farnham & Caffrey Gardner, 2014; Ford & Wei, 2015; Garside et…...

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  • ...…Lax, 2002; Lillis, 2003; Pajares, 2003; Seehusen & Miser, 2006; Leyden & Olds, 2007; Belcher, 2009; Wingate & Tribble, 2012; Bretag et al., 2013; Garbati & Samuels, 2013; Lax, 2014; Thompson, 2014; Harper & Vered, 2017; Huerta et al., 2017; Kostikov et al., 2017; Liu, 2017; Badenhorst, 2018;…...

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  • ...…Belcher, 2009; Stoilescu & McDougall, 2010; Fernsten & Reda, 2011; Pope et al., 2012; Taylor, 2012; Wingate & Tribble, 2012; Bretag et al., 2013; Garbati & Samuels, 2013; 5 / 24 Wisker, 2013; Badley, 2014; Lax, 2014; Thompson, 2014; White-Farnham & Caffrey Gardner, 2014; Ford & Wei, 2015;…...

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Major takeaways from this program include the value of student assessment in shaping publishing workshops; awareness of the discrepancies of registration numbers and actual attendance, highlighting the potential for enhanced promotion techniques; the importance of university press and faculty insight; and the benefits of collaboration among librarians, publishing professionals, and faculty members.
Abstract: BACKGROUND Students pursuing advanced degrees are increasingly expected to contribute to their discipline’s scholarly discourse during their tenure in graduate school. However, they are often unsure of how or where to begin the publishing process, and do not always feel comfortable asking for help from their faculty advisors or fellow students. Scholars, including librarians, have attempted to address these concerns by developing tools and services to meet the needs of future faculty. In recent years, university presses and research libraries have recognized their shared mission in furthering scholarship, with libraries themselves offering publishing education and expertise. PROJECT OVERVIEW During the 2012-2013 academic year, subject librarians and publishing professionals at the University of Michigan Library crafted a program to address students’ questions and concerns about the publishing lifecycle. This ongoing initiative includes a multi-semester workshop series developed in concert with faculty from departments throughout campus, as well as a supplementary online toolkit that takes into account the rapidly evolving nature of scholarly communication. LESSONS LEARNED Major takeaways from this program include: the value of student assessment in shaping publishing workshops; awareness of the discrepancies of registration numbers and actual attendance, highlighting the potential for enhanced promotion techniques; the importance of university press and faculty insight; and the benefits of collaboration among librarians, publishing professionals, and faculty members. NEXT STEPS Future iterations of this program will incorporate in-depth assessment of each program, a more interactive learning environment, and better scheduling and promotion of the workshop series.

12 citations


Cites background from "Publishing in Educational Research ..."

  • ...Garbati and Samuels (2013) investigated the coauthorship of articles in leading educational research journals and determined that despite the pressure, graduate student output was low, with less than 9% of articles co-authored by a student....

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References
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Book
01 Jan 1991
TL;DR: This work has shown that legitimate peripheral participation in communities of practice is not confined to midwives, tailors, quartermasters, butchers, non-drinking alcoholics and the like.
Abstract: In this important theoretical treatist, Jean Lave, anthropologist, and Etienne Wenger, computer scientist, push forward the notion of situated learning - that learning is fundamentally a social process. The authors maintain that learning viewed as situated activity has as its central defining characteristic a process they call legitimate peripheral participation (LPP). Learners participate in communities of practitioners, moving toward full participation in the sociocultural practices of a community. LPP provides a way to speak about crucial relations between newcomers and old-timers and about their activities, identities, artefacts, knowledge and practice. The communities discussed in the book are midwives, tailors, quartermasters, butchers, and recovering alcoholics, however, the process by which participants in those communities learn can be generalised to other social groups.

43,846 citations


"Publishing in Educational Research ..." refers background in this paper

  • ...theoretical orientations Notions of situated learning and situated practice can be used to understand collaborative writing.(28) In this model, learning occurs through participation within a specific context....

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Book
01 Jan 1978
TL;DR: In this paper, Cole and Scribner discuss the role of play in children's development and play as a tool and symbol in the development of perception and attention in a prehistory of written language.
Abstract: Introduction Michael Cole and Sylvia Scribner Biographical Note on L S Vygotsky Basic Theory and Data 1 Tool and Symbol in Child Development 2 The Development of Perception and Attention 3 Mastery of Memory and Thinking 4 Internalization of Higher Psychological Functions 5 Problems of Method Educational Implications 6 Interaction between Learning and Development 7 The Role of Play in Development 8 The Prehistory of Written Language Afterword Vera John-Steiner and Ellen Souberman Notes Vygotsky's Works Index

32,902 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The book provides stronger standards for maintaining the participant confidentiality and for reducing bias in language describing participants and suggests that researchers avoid the use of derogatory language such as using “minority” for “non-white” populations.
Abstract: Similar to previous editions, the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA), Sixth Edition provides guidelines on all aspects of writing style and formatting for writers, e

1,447 citations

Book
28 Aug 2009
TL;DR: In Why We Cooperate, Tomasello's studies of young children and great apes help identify the underlying psychological processes that very likely supported humans' earliest forms of complex collaboration and, ultimately, our unique forms of cultural organization.
Abstract: Understanding cooperation as a distinctly human combination of innate and learned behavior.Drop something in front of a two-year-old, and she's likely to pick it up for you. This is not a learned behavior, psychologist Michael Tomasello argues. Through observations of young children in experiments he himself has designed, Tomasello shows that children are naturally?and uniquely?cooperative. Put through similar experiments, for example, apes demonstrate the ability to work together and share, but choose not to. As children grow, their almost reflexive desire to help?without expectation of reward?becomes shaped by culture. They become more aware of being a member of a group. Groups convey mutual expectations, and thus may either encourage or discourage altruism and collaboration. Either way, cooperation emerges as a distinctly human combination of innate and learned behavior. In Why We Cooperate, Tomasello's studies of young children and great apes help identify the underlying psychological processes that very likely supported humans' earliest forms of complex collaboration and, ultimately, our unique forms of cultural organization, from the evolution of tolerance and trust to the creation of such group-level structures as cultural norms and institutions. Scholars Carol Dweck, Joan Silk, Brian Skyrms, and Elizabeth Spelke respond to Tomasello's findings and explore the implications.

1,100 citations


"Publishing in Educational Research ..." refers background in this paper

  • ...collaboration depends upon three components: (1) communication and co-ordination, (2) tolerance and trust, and (3) norms and institutions.(8) Participants in a collaborative activity need to have a similar or joint goal, co-ordinate their plans, and sustain and help one another in contexts that support their collaboration....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: For instance, at the Modern Language Association (MLA) convention in 1978, a multi-session forum called "Presence, Knowledge, and Authority in the Teaching of Literature" as mentioned in this paper was organized, which included a discussion of the authority and structure of the collaborative classroom structure of "interpretive communities."
Abstract: eighth or ninth on a list of ten items. Last year it appeared again, first on the list. Teachers of literature have also begun to talk about collaborative learning, although not always by that name. It is viewed as a way of engaging students more deeply with the text and also as an aspect of professors' engagement with the professional community. At its 1978 convention the Modern Language Association scheduled a multi-session forum entitled "Presence, Knowledge, and Authority in the Teaching of Literature." One of the associated sessions, called "Negotiations of Literary Knowledge," included a discussion of the authority and structure (including the collaborative classroom structure) of "interpretive communities." At the 1983 MLA convention collaborative practices in reestablishing authority and value in literary studies were examined under such rubrics as "Talking to the Academic Community: Conferences as Institutions" and "How Books 11 and 12 of Paradise Lost Got to be Valuable" (changes in interpretive attitudes in the community of Miltonists). In both these contexts collaborative learning is discussed sometimes as a process that constitutes fields or disciplines of study and sometimes as a pedagogical tool that "works" in teaching composition and literature. The former discussion, often highly theoretical, usually manages to keep at bay the more

1,018 citations