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Quantum cryptography : Public key distribution and coin tossing

01 Jan 1984-pp 175-179

About: The article was published on 1984-01-01 and is currently open access. It has received 5573 citation(s) till now. The article focuses on the topic(s): Quantum cryptography & Quantum money.
Topics: Quantum cryptography (62%), Quantum money (61%), Coin flipping (58%), BB84 (55%), Quantum key distribution (54%)
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Journal ArticleDOI
Peter W. Shor1, John Preskill2Institutions (2)
TL;DR: It is proved that the 1984 protocol of Bennett and Brassard (BB84) for quantum key distribution is secure, and a key distribution protocol based on entanglement purification is given, which can be proven secure using methods from Lo and Chau's proof of security for a similar protocol.
Abstract: We prove that the 1984 protocol of Bennett and Brassard (BB84) for quantum key distribution is secure. We first give a key distribution protocol based on entanglement purification, which can be proven secure using methods from Lo and Chau's proof of security for a similar protocol. We then show that the security of this protocol implies the security of BB84. The entanglement purification based protocol uses Calderbank-Shor-Steane codes, and properties of these codes are used to remove the use of quantum computation from the Lo-Chau protocol.

2,295 citations


BookDOI
01 Jan 2000-

1,782 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A practical secure communication protocol is developed, which uses a four-step procedure to ensure wireless information-theoretic security and is shown that the protocol is effective in secure key renewal-even in the presence of imperfect channel state information.
Abstract: This paper considers the transmission of confidential data over wireless channels. Based on an information-theoretic formulation of the problem, in which two legitimates partners communicate over a quasi-static fading channel and an eavesdropper observes their transmissions through a second independent quasi-static fading channel, the important role of fading is characterized in terms of average secure communication rates and outage probability. Based on the insights from this analysis, a practical secure communication protocol is developed, which uses a four-step procedure to ensure wireless information-theoretic security: (i) common randomness via opportunistic transmission, (ii) message reconciliation, (iii) common key generation via privacy amplification, and (iv) message protection with a secret key. A reconciliation procedure based on multilevel coding and optimized low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes is introduced, which allows to achieve communication rates close to the fundamental security limits in several relevant instances. Finally, a set of metrics for assessing average secure key generation rates is established, and it is shown that the protocol is effective in secure key renewal-even in the presence of imperfect channel state information.

1,676 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
David P. DiVincenzo1Institutions (1)
01 Sep 2000-Protein Science
Abstract: After a brief introduction to the principles and promise of quantum information processing, the requirements for the physical implementation of quantum computation are discussed. These five requirements, plus two relating to the communication of quantum information, are extensively ex- plored and related to the many schemes in atomic physics, quantum optics, nuclear and electron magnetic resonance spectroscopy, superconducting electronics, and quantum-dot physics, for achiev- ing quantum computing. I. INTRODUCTION � The advent of quantum information processing, as an abstract concept, has given birth to a great deal of new thinking, of a very concrete form, about how to create physical computing devices that operate in the hitherto unexplored quantum mechanical regime. The efforts now underway to produce working laboratory devices that perform this profoundly new form of information pro- cessing are the subject of this book. In this chapter I provide an overview of the common objectives of the investigations reported in the remain- der of this special issue. The scope of the approaches, proposed and underway, to the implementation of quan- tum hardware is remarkable, emerging from specialties in atomic physics (1), in quantum optics (2), in nuclear (3) and electron (4) magnetic resonance spectroscopy, in su- perconducting device physics (5), in electron physics (6), and in mesoscopic and quantum dot research (7). This amazing variety of approaches has arisen because, as we will see, the principles of quantum computing are posed using the most fundamental ideas of quantum mechanics, ones whose embodiment can be contemplated in virtually every branch of quantum physics. The interdisciplinary spirit which has been fostered as a result is one of the most pleasant and remarkable fea- tures of this field. The excitement and freshness that has been produced bodes well for the prospect for discovery, invention, and innovation in this endeavor.

1,580 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jun 1999-Siam Review
Abstract: A digital computer is generally believed to be an efficient universal computing device; that is, it is believed to be able to simulate any physical computing device with an increase in computation time by at most a polynomial factor. This may not be true when quantum mechanics is taken into consideration. This paper considers factoring integers and finding discrete logarithms, two problems that are generally thought to be hard on classical computers and that have been used as the basis of several proposed cryptosystems. Efficient randomized algorithms are given for these two problems on a hypothetical quantum computer. These algorithms take a number of steps polynomial in the input size, for example, the number of digits of the integer to be factored.

1,575 citations


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No. of citations received by the Paper in previous years
YearCitations
20226
2021503
2020484
2019442
2018318
2017349