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Journal ArticleDOI

Queer Kinship, Queer Eugenics: Edith Lees Ellis, Reproductive Futurity, and Sexual Citizenship

Deborah Cohler
- 01 Jan 2014 - 
- Vol. 26, Iss: 3, pp 122-146
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TLDR
The authors examined early twentieth-century discourses of reproduction, kinship, and citizenship through the lenses of feminist geopolitics and queer temporality, and illustrated how Ellis's articulations of alternative kinships and queer eugenics might move current work in queer theory to consider the embedded structure of racial hierarchies in discussions of futurity, and the relationship of normative and oppositional kinship structures to the geopolitical.
Abstract
Edith Lees Ellis, now remembered most for her marriage to sexologist Havelock Ellis, produced a suite of political essays and fiction at the turn of the twentieth century that explored questions of racial citizenship, reproductive politics, and women’s rights through the discourse of eugenics. Reading Ellis’s 1906 My Cornish Neighbours in relation to current debates surrounding queer theory reveals an important relationship between the history of eugenics and current queer theories of futurity and abjection. By examining early twentieth-century discourses of reproduction, kinship, and citizenship through the lenses of feminist geopolitics and queer temporality, the article illustrates how Ellis’s articulations of alternative kinships and queer eugenics might move current work in queer theory to consider the embedded structure of racial hierarchies in discussions of futurity, and the relationship of normative and oppositional kinship structures to the geopolitical.

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Journal Article

Studies in the Psychology of Sex

TL;DR: Havelock Ellis as discussed by the authors investigated the relationship between love and pain and concluded that pain is a powerful sexual stimulant under certain abnormal circumstances; that it does so because pain is the most powerful means of arousing emotion; and that anger and fear are the two emotions most intimately associated with fear, through which the process of natural selection largely works.
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Book ChapterDOI

Edith Ellis, Sapphic Idealism, and The Lover’s Calendar (1912)

TL;DR: Suzanne Raitt as discussed by the authors examines the ways in which Vita Sackville-West uses her 1920 autobiography, unpublished in her lifetime, to try to understand the guilt and shame she feels as a consequence of her "perversion".