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MonographDOI

Queer theory : law, culture, empire

TL;DR: This book discusses Queer Theory, Neoliberalism and Urban Governance, and the use of Comparative and International Law in Arguments about LGBT Rights.
Abstract: Chapter 1 Introduction, Robert Leckey and Kim Brooks Part 1: Constitution Chapter 2 Queer Theory, Neoliberalism and Urban Governance, Jon Binnie Chapter 3 Regulating 'Perversion': The Role of Tolerance in De-Radicalizing the Rights Claims of Sexual Subalterns, Ratna Kapur Part 2: Representation Chapter 4 Cinema of Queer Desires: Bombay Cinema and Emergent Sexualities, Shohini Ghosh Chapter 5 Post-Apartheid Fraternity, Post-Apartheid Democracy, Post-Apartheid Sexuality: Queer Reflections on Jane Alexander's 'Butcher Boys', Jaco Barnard-Naude Chapter 6 The Judicial Virtue of Sexuality, Leslie J Moran Part 3: Regulation Chapter 7 Reproductive Outsiders - The Perils and Disruptive Potential of Reproductive Coalitions, Jenni Millbank Chapter 8 Queer/Religious Potentials in US Same-Sex Marriage Debates, Jeffrey A Redding Chapter 9 What's Queer about Polygamy?, Margaret Denike Part 4: Exclusion Chapter 10 An 'Imperial' Strategy? The Use of Comparative and International Law in Arguments about LGBT Rights, Nicholas Bamforth Chapter 11 Reproducing Empire in Same Sex Relationship Recognition and Immigration Law Reform, Nan Seuffert Chapter 12 UnSettled, Ruthann Robson
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors address relevant research questions in the areas of intimacy and care, household formation, and spaces and institutions and advance an intersectional perspective which incorporates class as a non-essential core category.
Abstract: Academic research and popular writing on nonmonogamy and polyamory has so far paid insufficient attention to class divisions and questions of political economy. This is striking since research indicates the significance of class and race privilege within many polyamorous communities. This structure of privilege is mirrored in the exclusivist construction of these communities. The article aims to fill the gap created by the silence on class by suggesting a research agenda which is attentive to class and socioeconomic inequality. The paper addresses relevant research questions in the areas of intimacy and care, household formation, and spaces and institutions and advances an intersectional perspective which incorporates class as nondispensable core category. The author suggests that critical research in the field can stimulate critical self-reflexive practice on the level of community relations and activism. He further points to the critical relevance of Marxist and Postmarxist theories as important resources for the study of polyamory and calls for the study of the contradictions within poly culture from a materialist point of view.

48 citations

Dissertation
19 Apr 2016
TL;DR: In this article, the authors focus on the everyday lives of young queer people living in Delhi in the period between the two judgments and show how recognition emerges as an unstable and negotiable element in a cluster of desires, attachments, and aspirations that young queers must balance in their everyday efforts to find a viable way to live that allows them not to deny their sexuality and, at the same time, to be included in social relations.
Abstract: What does recognition mean for people whose sexuality has for a long time been criminalised? Over the last years, the recognition of India’s queers has been the focus of numerous contestations as a result of the complex developments around Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code, which criminalises ‘carnal acts against the order of nature’. The Section had been partially repealed in 2009 by the Delhi High Court, only to be reinstated in full by the Supreme Court at the end of 2013. In this thesis, I focus on the everyday lives of young queer people (18 to 25 year old) living in Delhi in the period between the two judgments. The questions that guide my thesis are: in what ways does legal recognition (or lack thereof) interact with the everyday life of queer people? How do young queer people relate to the idea of being recognised for their sexuality? What possibilities for recognition are articulated in the space between the official letter of the law and people’s everyday lives? And what is recognition made of, from the perspective of young queers?Focusing on a window of time where same-sex sexualities had been officially recognised for the first time, this thesis raises questions about how recognition, sexuality, and subjectivity are lived and experienced in practice in a period characterised simultaneously by high hopes and pervading insecurity. The situated perspective I favour in my thesis sheds light on the ways in which young people negotiate between their desire to be recognised as queers and the concomitant desire to participate in relations of reciprocity in different contexts, such as the family, peer networks, and the law. Through an analysis of data collected during several fieldwork periods in Delhi, I show how recognition emerges as an unstable and negotiable element in a cluster of desires, attachments, and aspirations that young queers must balance in their everyday efforts to find a viable way to live that allows them not to deny their sexuality and, at the same time, to be included in social relations. (Less)

34 citations

DissertationDOI
01 Jun 2016
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore the experiences and representations of men who sell sex to men and the roles they have in coconstructing the meanings of queer, male, and sexual identities and practices.
Abstract: This study seeks to record and document the voices, experiences and representations of men who sell sex to men in London through advertising in queer media. It examines the diverse experiences and representations of men who sell sex to men and the roles they have in coconstructing the meanings of queer, male, and sexual identities and practices. It explores data triangulated from a queer ethnography of London’s queer scenes, including: semi-structured interviews with key informants (n=20), samples of escort and masseur advertisements collected from print media, data from social networking websites aimed at gay men, and field notes from collecting data within London’s queer scenes. Eighteen of the interview participants are gay or bisexual men who have used advertising to sell sex to other men in London themselves. The study finds that classified advertising can be used as a canon of texts to explore socially constructed records of sexual and economic stories. It details how men have used promotion strategies and technologies to sell sex to other men in London from the early 1990s to the present and how those media have evolved in that time. It suggest ways that sex in this queer, commercial scene is often comparable to more explicit forms of commercial sex transactions. In turn, shifts are illustrated in how sex work is defined here, including ways that the socio-economic, embodied, performative priorities of queer men are interrelated with their geographic and temporal contexts. The study examines ways that typological models can be limiting to how sex work is understood and proposes an (inter-) relational model grounded in the data from men who have sold sex, semiotic structures of analysis, and queer theory. Finally, it argues that these frameworks usefully operationalise structures of subjectivity in empirical research of human and social sciences.

25 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article argued that as a political project seeking institutional and social change based on dominant “Western” LGBT and queer political frameworks, queer criminology may exclude Indigenous people and overlook political goals such as decolonization.
Abstract: This article highlights the ways that queer criminology appears to be invested in, and reflective of, colonial power dynamics. Drawing from the work of counter-colonial criminologists, it analyzes the way that, as a scholarly criminological project of producing knowledge about crime and criminal justice, queer criminology may enact a form of epistemological violence that subjugates Indigenous knowledges and sustains colonial power. This article then argues that as a queer political project seeking institutional and social change based on dominant “Western” LGBT and queer political frameworks, queer criminology may exclude Indigenous people and overlook political goals such as decolonization. In doing so, the article problematizes queer criminology’s investment in settler colonialism, establishes why greater attention needs to be paid to decolonization in queer criminology, and opens up the possibilities for advancing a decolonizing agenda within the field.

14 citations

Book ChapterDOI
15 May 2015
TL;DR: In the 28-member bloc of the European Union (EU), gender and sexuality rights are highly regarded as part of the catalog of fundamental rights available to EU citizens, and the EU is viewed as a vanguard in promoting LGBTQ rights internationally as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: In the 28-member bloc of the European Union (EU), gender and sexuality rights are highly regarded as part of the catalog of fundamental rights available to EU citizens, and the EU is viewed as a vanguard in promoting LGBTQ rights internationally. This chapter highlights an ambiguous aspect deduced from the EU's economic origin: the predication of sexual rights on neoliberal market policy creation. LGBTQ politics are a comparatively young field of policy action and analysis, and the bloc's general antidiscrimination agenda covering gender and sexual orientation specifically in employment results from the fact that all EU law has to be justified in relation to the liberalization of the single market. The chapter focuses on the politics of sexuality, and explores how the construction of sexual differences conditions the work of LGBT advocates in regional markets in the context of the EU's rights policy discourse, which has at least normatively been broadened to include all major ethnic and social minorities.

13 citations