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Race Resistance and the Boy Scout Movement In British Colonial Africa

29 Nov 2004-
TL;DR: Parsons as mentioned in this paper studied the Boy Scouts Movement in British Colonial Africa and found that African scouts were both an instrument of colonial authority and a subversive challenge to the legitimacy of the British Empire.
Abstract: Conceived By General Sir Robert Baden-Powell as a way to reduce class tensions in Edwardian Britain, scouting evolved into an international youth movement. It offered a vision of romantic outdoor life as a cure for disruption caused by industrialization and urbanization. Scouting's global spread was due to its success in attaching itself to institutions of authority. As a result, scouting has become embroiled in controversies in the civil rights struggle in the American South, in nationalist resistance movements in India, and in the contemporary American debate over gay rights. In Race, Resistance, and the Boy Scout Movement in British Colonial Africa, Timothy Parsons uses scouting as an analytical tool to explore the tensions in colonial society. Introduced by British officials to strengthen their rule, the movement targeted the students, juvenile delinquents, and urban migrants who threatened the social stability of the regime. Yet Africans themselves used scouting to claim the rights of full imperial citizenship. They invoked the Fourth Scout Law, which declared that a scout was a brother to every other scout, to challenge racial discrimination. Parsons shows that African scouting was both an instrument of colonial authority and a subversive challenge to the legitimacy of the British Empire. His study of African scouting demonstrates the implications and far-reaching consequences of colonial authority in all its guises.
Citations
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01 Jan 2011
TL;DR: In the previous edition of Studying Africa as discussed by the authors, the authors made a broadening the perspective by giving more prominence to books which explore Africa in global history; that is, the historical relations of the continent around the Mediterranean, the Indian Ocean and the Atlantic Ocean, in addition to providing examples of the rapidly growing body of literature on the African diaspora.
Abstract: The history chapter in the previous edition of Studying Africa included books published up to 2004. Since then, the literature on the history of Africa has grown considerably in both scope and quality, and many new themes have appeared. This is the starting point for the chapter that follows, which is devoted to books on the history of Africa published between 2004 and the middle of 2010. The following selection aims at broadening the perspective by giving more prominence to books which explore Africa in global history; that is, the historical relations of the continent around the Mediterranean, the Indian Ocean and the Atlantic Ocean, in addition to providing examples of the rapidly growing body of literature on the African diaspora. An attempt has also been made to emphasise books by African historians, where the many West African historians at American universities in particular have been prominent contributors. There is a gradual transition into the next chapter, which deals with politics, economics and society. A number of general surveys cover long periods of time and extend into the current period, and books about topical themes often contain excellent historical background chapters. For this reason, the reader is advised to consult both chapters.

167 citations

Book
15 Nov 2012
TL;DR: The Afterlife of Empire as mentioned in this paper explores how decolonization transformed British society in the 1950s and 1960s by recasting the genealogy and geography of welfare by charting its unseen dependence on the end of empire, and illuminating the relationship between the postwar and the post-imperial.
Abstract: “Quietly dazzling. . . . In this gripping account of welfare’s postcolonial history, Jordanna Bailkin throws the archives wide open and invites us to walk through them with new eyes—and with renewed appreciation for the intimate connections between empire and metropole in the making of contemporary Britain. The Afterlife of Empire challenges us to reimagine how we think and teach the twentieth century in Britain and beyond.” Antoinette Burton, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign “A brilliant contribution to the history of twentieth-century Britain. It does what no other book has done: narrating the end of empire and the rise of the postwar welfare state together, while placing the stories of ordinary people—children, adolescents, parents, husbands, and wives—at the heart of this account. With this book, Bailkin transforms our understanding of how some of the most critical issues of twentieth-century British history were not just perceived, but lived.” stephen j. brooke, York University The Afterlife of Empire investigates how decolonization transformed British society in the 1950s and 1960s. Although usually charted through diplomatic details, the empire’s collapse was also a personal process that altered everyday life, restructuring routines and social interactions. Using a vast array of recently declassified sources, Jordanna Bailkin recasts the genealogy and geography of welfare by charting its unseen dependence on the end of empire, and illuminates the relationship between the postwar and the postimperial. Jordanna Bailkin is Giovanni and Amne Costigan Professor of History and Professor of History and Women’s Studies at the University of Washington. Berkeley Series in British Studies, 4

135 citations

01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: In this article, the authors provide an introduction to the basic handbooks and standard works on contemporary Africa, and also offer guidance on searching for literature and facts within the field of social sciences.
Abstract: Studying Africa provides an introduction to the basic handbooks and standard works on contemporary Africa. It also offers guidance on searching for literature and facts wwithin the field of social ...

116 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
25 Aug 2009-PLOS ONE
TL;DR: The results demonstrate that predation can be important indirect driver of the evolution of both pathogen virulence and host immunity in communities with multiple species interactions.
Abstract: The pathogen virulence is traditionally thought to co-evolve as a result of reciprocal selection with its host organism. In natural communities, pathogens and hosts are typically embedded within a web of interactions with other species, which could affect indirectly the pathogen virulence and host immunity through trade-offs. Here we show that selection by predation can affect both pathogen virulence and host immune defence. Exposing opportunistic bacterial pathogen Serratia marcescens to predation by protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila decreased its virulence when measured as host moth Parasemia plantaginis survival. This was probably because the bacterial anti-predatory traits were traded off with bacterial virulence factors, such as motility or resource use efficiency. However, the host survival depended also on its allocation to warning signal that is used against avian predation. When infected with most virulent ancestral bacterial strain, host larvae with a small warning signal survived better than those with an effective large signal. This suggests that larval immune defence could be traded off with effective defence against bird predators. However, the signal size had no effect on larval survival when less virulent control or evolved strains were used for infection suggesting that anti-predatory defence against avian predators, might be less constrained when the invading pathogen is rather low in virulence. Our results demonstrate that predation can be important indirect driver of the evolution of both pathogen virulence and host immunity in communities with multiple species interactions. Thus, the pathogen virulence should be viewed as a result of both past evolutionary history, and current ecological interactions.

81 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the Boy Scouts Movement in the UK was analysed in order to illustrate how an emphasis upon seemingly banal, embodied practices such as dressing, writing and crafting can provide a counter-view to prevailing notions of the elite, organisational "scripting" of individualised, geopolitical identities.
Abstract: This article brings a feminist geopolitics to bear upon an analysis of the Boy Scout Movement in Britain in order to illustrate how an emphasis upon seemingly banal, embodied practices such as dressing, writing and crafting can provide a counter-view to prevailing notions of the elite, organisational ‘scripting’ of individualised, geopolitical identities. Here, these practices undertaken by girls are understood not as subversive, or even transgressive, in the face of broader-scale constructions of the self and the collective body, but rather as related moments in the emergence of a complex, tension-ridden ‘movement’ that exceed specific attempts at fixity along the lines of gender. Using archival data, this article examines various embodied practices by ‘girl scouts’ that were made possible by such attempts at fixity but which also, in turn, opened up new spaces of engagement and negotiation. A cumulative shift from a determinedly masculine to a co-educational organisation over the course of the twentieth...

47 citations