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Journal ArticleDOI

Radiator - efficient message propagation in context-aware systems

07 Apr 2014-Journal of Internet Services and Applications (Springer London)-Vol. 5, Iss: 1, pp 4

TL;DR: Radiator, a middleware to assist application programmers implementing efficient context propagation mechanisms within their applications makes an efficient use of network bandwidth, arguably the biggest bottleneck in the deployment of large-scale context propagation systems.

AbstractApplications such as Facebook, Twitter and Foursquare have brought the mass adoption of personal short messages, distributed in (soft) real-time on the Internet to a large number of users. These messages are complemented with rich contextual information such as the identity, time and location of the person sending the message (e.g., Foursquare has millions of users sharing their location on a regular basis, with almost 1 million updates per day). Such contextual messages raise serious concerns in terms of scalability and delivery delay; this results not only from their huge number but also because the set of user recipients changes for each message (as their interests continuously change), preventing the use of well-known solutions such as pub-sub and multicast trees. This leads to the use of non-scalable broadcast based solutions or point-to-point messaging. We propose Radiator, a middleware to assist application programmers implementing efficient context propagation mechanisms within their applications. Based on each user’s current context, Radiator continuously adapts each message propagation path and delivery delay, making an efficient use of network bandwidth, arguably the biggest bottleneck in the deployment of large-scale context propagation systems. Our experimental results demonstrate a 20x reduction on consumed bandwidth without affecting the real-time usefulness of the propagated messages.

Topics: Multicast (52%), Context (language use) (52%), Middleware (distributed applications) (52%), The Internet (51%)

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Citations
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
26 Nov 2018
TL;DR: A new dictionary maintenance algorithm called PreDict is designed that adjusts its operation over time by adapting its parameters to the message stream and that amortizes the resulting compression-induced bandwidth overhead by enabling high compression ratios.
Abstract: Data usage is a significant concern, particularly in smartphone applications, M2M communications and for Internet of Things (IoT) applications. Messages in these domains are often exchanged with a backend infrastructure using publish/subscribe (pub/sub). Shared dictionary compression has been shown to reduce data usage in pub/sub networks beyond that obtained using well-known techniques, such as DEFLATE, gzip and delta encoding, but such compression requires manual configuration, which increases the operational complexity.To address this challenge, we design a new dictionary maintenance algorithm called PreDict that adjusts its operation over time by adapting its parameters to the message stream and that amortizes the resulting compression-induced bandwidth overhead by enabling high compression ratios.PreDict observes the message stream, takes the costs specific to pub/sub into account and uses machine learning and parameter fitting to adapt the parameters of dictionary compression to match the characteristics of the streaming messages continuously over time. The primary goal is to reduce the overall bandwidth of data dissemination without any manual parameterization.PreDict reduces the overall bandwidth by 72.6% on average. Furthermore, the technique reduces the computational overhead by a 2x for publishers and by a 1.4x for subscribers compared to the state of the art using manually selected parameters. In challenging configurations that have many more publishers (10k) than subscribers (1), the overall bandwidth reductions are more than 2x higher than that obtained by the state of the art.

3 citations


Cites background from "Radiator - efficient message propag..."

  • ...Other approaches for reducing bandwidth in pub/sub consider user-defined aggregation functions, which assist application programmers in implementing efficient context propagation [12]....

    [...]


Proceedings ArticleDOI
02 Oct 2016
TL;DR: The proposed procedure allows a user more than three attempts of authentication by switching after two failures to a more secure authentication protocol keeping a balance between QoP and QoE measures.
Abstract: Authenticating users connecting to online services, social networks or m-banking became an indispensable element of our everyday life. Reliable authentication is a foundation of security of Internet services but, on the other hand, also a source of users' frustration due to possible account blocking in case of three fails. In this paper we propose a model of authentication service management which helps in keeping a balance between the authentication security level and positive users' perception of this procedure. The proposed procedure allows a user more than three attempts of authentication by switching after two failures to a more secure authentication protocol keeping a balance between QoP and QoE measures. Finally, the procedure determines an optimal path of authentication using a decision tree algorithm.

1 citations


Cites background from "Radiator - efficient message propag..."

  • ..., [13, 14, 15]) contextual information can be used to improve Internet systems work....

    [...]


29 Mar 2008
Abstract: This Second Workshop on Scalable Stream Processing System (SSPS) continued the success of the First Workshop on SSPS. The focus of the workshop is on the scalability issues of a stream processing system challenged by ever increasing load and stringent requirement on the system. Being co-located with EDBT '08 was an ideal setting for the workshop, considering the reputation of EDBT as a top conference on database technology.

01 Jan 2010
Abstract: It is our great pleasure to welcome you to the 9th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Information Processing in Sensor Networks (IPSN 2010). We hope you enjoy this conference that attracts a diverse set of attendees from both academia and industry and is a leading venue for publications and idea exchange on sensor networks. IPSN is unique in its broad coverage of the field, ranging from analytic foundations to system implementation and platforms. It is a meeting point of theory and practice embodied in its two tracks; Information Processing (IP) and Sensor Platforms, Tools and Design Methods (SPOTS). The field of sensor networks has seen a significant expansion and maturation over the years. In evidence of such growth, IPSN 2010 received an impressive number of high quality contributions, totaling 58 in the SPOTS track and 117 in the IP track. These submissions underwent a very careful review process, each receiving at least 3 reviews and occasionally up to 5 reviews. The review phase was followed by an online discussion by the technical program committee, culminating in a technical program committee meeting. Only 31 papers were selected for publication of which 20 were in the IP track and 11 in the SPOTS track. All accepted papers were assigned shepherds to help further improve the quality of the final manuscripts.

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper factors out the common denominator underlying these variants: full decoupling of the communicating entities in time, space, and synchronization to better identify commonalities and divergences with traditional interaction paradigms.
Abstract: Well adapted to the loosely coupled nature of distributed interaction in large-scale applications, the publish/subscribe communication paradigm has recently received increasing attention. With systems based on the publish/subscribe interaction scheme, subscribers register their interest in an event, or a pattern of events, and are subsequently asynchronously notified of events generated by publishers. Many variants of the paradigm have recently been proposed, each variant being specifically adapted to some given application or network model. This paper factors out the common denominator underlying these variants: full decoupling of the communicating entities in time, space, and synchronization. We use these three decoupling dimensions to better identify commonalities and divergences with traditional interaction paradigms. The many variations on the theme of publish/subscribe are classified and synthesized. In particular, their respective benefits and shortcomings are discussed both in terms of interfaces and implementations.

3,243 citations