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Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1080/16066359.2020.1755657

Reciprocal associations between shyness, self-esteem, loneliness, depression and Internet addiction in Chinese adolescents

04 Mar 2021-Addiction Research & Theory (Informa UK Limited)-Vol. 29, Iss: 2, pp 98-110
Abstract: The present study aimed to test reciprocal longitudinal associations among shyness, self-esteem, loneliness, depression, and Internet addiction.A total of 1047 junior middle school students partici...

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Topics: Loneliness (61%), Shyness (60%)
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Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.21134/RPCNA.2020.MON.2056
Abstract: espanolEl impacto del confinamiento por el COVID-19 en el uso de internet y la evasion en los adolescentes. La pandemia del COVID-19 ha tenido un impacto significativo en el funcionamiento diario, tomandose medidas importantes para reducir la propagacion del virus. Las escuelas y los espacios publicos se han cerrado durante largos periodos, y la distancia fisica se ha impuesto. Los adolescentes y jovenes han tenido que soportar un estres significativo al tiempo que lidiar con las situaciones propias de su desarrollo. Los estudios informan de un aumento en la adiccion al juego y al uso de Internet con un impacto perjudicial en el bienestar psicosocial. El objetivo del presente estudio fue examinar el impacto del confinamiento en el uso de Internet en los adolescentes, comparando sus habitos con antes de la pandemia. Ademas, se estudia la relacion entre la adiccion al juego, el uso de Internet y las preocupaciones por el COVID-19. Adolescentes de varios paises (India, Malasia, Mexico y Reino Unido) completaron los cuestionarios online, que se distribuyeron a traves de redes sociales y redes de jovenes. Se incluyeron preguntas sobre Internet, redes sociales, juego, depresion, soledad, aversion y COVID-19. Los resultados muestran que los adolescentes en general han aumentado el uso de redes sociales y de servicios de transmision. Ademas, los que obtuvieron puntuaciones altas en adiccion al juego, uso compulsivo de Internet y uso de redes sociales tambien informaron de puntuaciones altas en depresion, soledad, aversion, mala calidad del sueno y ansiedad relacionada con la pandemia. Nuestros hallazgos indican que, independientemente del pais de residencia, el confinamiento por COVID-19 ha tenido un efecto significativo en el uso de Internet y en el bienestar psicosocial de los adolescentes. Se destaca la necesidad de abordar el distres relacionado con la pandemia para reducir el efecto de las estrategias de afrontamiento desadaptativas. EnglishThe COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on everyday functioning, considerable measures being taken to reduce the spread of the virus. Schools and social avenues have been placed on prolonged lockdowns, with people continuing to maintain physical distance. Adolescents and young people have had to endure significant stress alongside dealing with developmental characteristics. Amidst all of this, studies report an increase in gaming addiction and internet use with detrimental impact on psychosocial well-being. The aim of the present study was to examine the impact of lockdown on internet use in adolescents, comparing their habits from before the pandemic. Furthermore, this research aimed to investigate the relationship between gaming addiction, internet use and COVID-19 worries. Adolescents from several countries (e.g., India, Malaysia, Mexico and the UK) completed online questionnaires, shared via social media and youth networks. These measures included questions on internet, social media, gaming, depression, loneliness, escapism and COVID-19. Results show that adolescents generally have increased their use of social media sites and streaming services. Further, those who scored highly on gaming addiction, compulsive internet use and social media use also reported high scores of depression, loneliness, escapism, poor sleep quality and anxiety related to the pandemic. Our findings indicate that, regardless of country of residence, the COVID-19 outbreak has had a significant effect on adolescent internet use and psychosocial well-being. The need to address pandemic related distress to reduce the effect of maladaptive coping strategies is highlighted.

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42 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.CRBEHA.2021.100032
Kehinde Clement Lawrence1Institutions (1)
01 Nov 2021-
Abstract: The goal of this study was to examine the mediating role of social internet use on the correlation of parental efficacy, peer influence and social functioning of adolescents. Methodologically, data was collected from a sample of 496 adolescents (Male = 18.5%; Female = 81.5%, Mage = 15.9), the idea that the relationship between parental efficacy, peer influence and social functioning of adolescents could be influenced by the mediating power of social internet use was tested. Consistent with this hypothesis, the results revealed positive and significant relationships between social functioning, social internet use (r = .373, p DE = .0033), but that of peer influence was lesser (IE = 0015

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2 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.ABREP.2021.100379
Abstract: Problematic internet use in adolescents has been shown to significantly increase over the past few years, with COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns reinforcing this phenomena globally. We sought to explore whether problematic internet use in specific countries was related to emotional well-being and importantly whether this is predicted by psychological distress. There is a growing number of studies showing that problematic internet use is increasingly prevalent in countries with emerging economies, however we have yet to find out to what extent other factors are influencing this behaviour in adolescents and young people. This study invited young people from countries such India, Mexico, Philippines and Turkey to complete a set of self-reports on their daily internet habits, social media use, alongside questions on psychological distress, self-esteem, loneliness and escapism. A total of 1182 young people aged between 16 and 25 years old completed these questionnaires online. The results showed that there were significant difference in problematic internet use scores among adolescents in the Philippines and Turkey. More specifically, social media use was significantly higher amongst young people from the Philippines whereas gaming addiction was significantly high in the Turkish sample. These findings also revealed that psychological distress, loneliness, and low self-esteem consistently predicted problematic internet use. Taken together these results emphasise that there are several factors underlying growing figures of problematic internet use in young people, these factors include emotional distress, need for escapism, loneliness, and social media use, however, going forward more nuanced cultural differences should also be considered.

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Topics: Loneliness (59%), The Internet (51%), Escapism (51%)

1 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1007/S12144-020-01073-9
Yujie Gao1, Wenxian Zhang1, Qiuyue Deng1, Changlin Sun1  +2 moreInstitutions (1)
18 Sep 2020-Current Psychology
Abstract: Existing studies have explored the relationship between shyness and specific indicators of social adjustment of children or middle school students, indicating that individuals with shyness have social maladjustment. However, few studies have examined the overall social adjustment and underlying mechanisms of college students. Therefore, the present study explored the influence of shyness on the overall social adjustment of college students and its underlying mechanism from the perspective of individuals’ interaction with their environment. 1201 participants (Mage = 19.43, SD = 1.40) from two universities in China were measured using the College Student Shyness Scale, Adolescent Alienation Scale, School Connectedness Scale, and Chinese College Student Adjustment Scale. The results showed that shyness was negatively associated with social adjustment and that alienation partially mediated the relationship between them. Moreover, this mediation effect was moderated by school connectedness. Specifically, school connectedness moderated the second stage of the mediating process, that is, school connectedness could effectively alleviate the social maladjustment caused by alienation, and the protection effect of this moderation on low alienation was more obvious. These findings enrich the research on social adjustment of college students, and show that reducing alienation and strengthening school connectedness can alleviate the maladjustment of shy college students.

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Topics: Shyness (63%), Social connectedness (56%), Moderated mediation (55%) ... show more

1 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.ABREP.2021.100349
Abstract: Research shows that internet addiction continues to grow globally, with wider access to the internet and changing use of smartphones. The compulsive internet use scale (CIUS) which has been found to be consistently associated with pathological internet use, is widely considered a measure for prolonged and problematic internet use. CIUS had been translated and adapted in several countries with reports of good reliability. However, to our knowledge this is the first study that examined the psychometric properties of the CIUS scale in three countries who share similar collectivistic attitudes and are a part of growing economies. This link was shared widely amongst young adults (aged 18–25 years), and a total of 837 participants completed the questionnaires. They completed the CIUS scale alongside a measure for escapism and self-esteem. These additional self-reports were added to assess the construct validity of the CIUS. The results from this study confirms the single factor structure of the CIUS as the best fit for this scale, this single factor solution was found for all the three countries. Similarly, high scores of internal reliability were observed for samples in India, Philippines and Turkey. We further found the CIUS to positively correlate with scores of escapism in the Turkish sample only. Taken together these results suggest that the CIUS is an effective measure regardless of country of residence, whilst highlighting the underlying differences in escapism that may need further attention.

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1 Citations


References
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65 results found


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1080/10705519909540118
Li-tze Hu, Peter M. Bentler1Institutions (1)
Abstract: This article examines the adequacy of the “rules of thumb” conventional cutoff criteria and several new alternatives for various fit indexes used to evaluate model fit in practice. Using a 2‐index presentation strategy, which includes using the maximum likelihood (ML)‐based standardized root mean squared residual (SRMR) and supplementing it with either Tucker‐Lewis Index (TLI), Bollen's (1989) Fit Index (BL89), Relative Noncentrality Index (RNI), Comparative Fit Index (CFI), Gamma Hat, McDonald's Centrality Index (Mc), or root mean squared error of approximation (RMSEA), various combinations of cutoff values from selected ranges of cutoff criteria for the ML‐based SRMR and a given supplemental fit index were used to calculate rejection rates for various types of true‐population and misspecified models; that is, models with misspecified factor covariance(s) and models with misspecified factor loading(s). The results suggest that, for the ML method, a cutoff value close to .95 for TLI, BL89, CFI, RNI, and G...

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Topics: Cutoff (52%), Goodness of fit (51%)

63,509 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1177/014662167700100306
Lenore Sawyer Radloff1Institutions (1)
Abstract: The CES-D scale is a short self-report scale designed to measure depressive symptomatology in the general population. The items of the scale are symptoms associated with depression which have been used in previously validated longer scales. The new scale was tested in household interview surveys and in psychiatric settings. It was found to have very high internal consistency and adequate test- retest repeatability. Validity was established by pat terns of correlations with other self-report measures, by correlations with clinical ratings of depression, and by relationships with other variables which support its construct validity. Reliability, validity, and factor structure were similar across a wide variety of demographic characteristics in the general population samples tested. The scale should be a useful tool for epidemiologic studies of de pression.

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44,791 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1177/0049124192021002005
Michael W. Browne1, Robert Cudeck2Institutions (2)
Abstract: This article is concerned with measures of fit of a model. Two types of error involved in fitting a model are considered. The first is error of approximation which involves the fit of the model, wi...

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23,630 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1177/003803856900300250
01 May 1969-Sociology

14,993 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1089/CPB.1998.1.237
Abstract: Anecdotal reports indicated that some on-line users were becoming addicted to the Internet in much the same way that others became addicted to drugs or alcohol, which resulted in academic, social, and occupational impairment. However, research among sociologists, psychologists, or psychiatrists has not formally identified addictive use of the Internet as a problematic behavior. This study investigated the existence of Internet addiction and the extent of problems caused by such potential misuse. Of all the diagnoses referenced in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders—Fourth Edition (DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1995), Pathological Gambling was viewed as most akin to the pathological nature of Internet use. By using Pathological Gambling as a model, addictive Internet use can be defined as an impulse-control disorder that does not involve an intoxicant. Therefore, this study developed a brief eight-item questionnaire referred to as a Diagnostic Questionnaire (DQ), which mod...

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Topics: Internet addiction disorder (67%), Computer addiction (58%), Video game addiction (56%) ... show more

3,682 Citations


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No. of citations received by the Paper in previous years
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20218
20202