scispace - formally typeset
Open AccessJournal ArticleDOI

Reflect on This

Susan Orr, +2 more
- 01 Dec 2010 - 
- Vol. 3, Iss: 3, pp 197-210
Reads0
Chats0
TLDR
The authors explored the use of a catalogue document that two of the authors used to encourage students to reflect as part of the B.A. (Hons) Theatre level 2 modules entitled performing the self and artist as witness.
Abstract
In this article we reflect on reflection. To do this, we share examples of pedagogic approaches used in undergraduate performance programmes at York St John University that re-situate reflective practice within creative practice. For example, we explore the creative, multimodal use of a catalogue document that two of the authors used to encourage students to reflect as part of the B.A. (Hons) Theatre level 2 modules entitled performing the self & artist as witness. These modules aim to encourage students to consider themselves in some sense auteurs of themselves and their art practice. The case study illustrates that we need to go beyond the familiar if we are to be reflexive about the role of reflection in creative practice education.

read more

Content maybe subject to copyright    Report

Reflect on this!
ORR, Susan, RICHMOND, Jules Dorey and RICHMOND, David
Available from Sheffield Hallam University Research Archive (SHURA) at:
http://shura.shu.ac.uk/4459/
This document is the author deposited version. You are advised to consult the
publisher's version if you wish to cite from it.
Published version
ORR, Susan, RICHMOND, Jules Dorey and RICHMOND, David (2010). Reflect on
this! Journal of Writing in Creative Practice, 3 (3), 197-210.
Copyright and re-use policy
See http://shura.shu.ac.uk/information.html
Sheffield Hallam University Research Archive
http://shura.shu.ac.uk

1
Reflect on this!
Susan Orr, York St John University
Jules Dorey Richmond, York St John University
David Richmond, York St John University
Abstract
In this article we reflect on reflection. To do this, we share examples of pedagogic
approaches used in undergraduate performance programmes at York St John
University that re-situate reflective practice within creative practice. For example, we
explore the creative, multimodal use of a catalogue document that two of the authors
used to encourage students to reflect as part of the B.A. (Hons) Theatre level 2
modules entitled ‘performing the self’ & ‘artist as witness’. These modules aim to
encourage students to consider themselves in some sense auteurs of themselves and
their art practice. The case study illustrates that we need to go beyond the familiar if
we are to be reflexive about the role of reflection in creative practice education.
Keywords
reflection
reflexivity
theatre
art and design
practice

2
Introduction
It is a truth universally acknowledged that reflective practice is at the heart of creative
education. Reflection enjoys a privileged position in Higher Education. It has become
an orthodoxy, almost, in Foucauldian terms, a ‘regime of truth’ (1990). It is
impossible to be against reflection. In this article we reflect on reflection to ‘make the
familiar strange’. We challenge the hegemonic position of reflection in creative
practice, and we offer an example of reflective pedagogy that models the reflexivity
suited to an arts practice context. For clarity there are points in this article where we
differentiate and highlight the different contributions of the three authors. We hope
that this signposting unpacks the different authorial voices and experiences.
In creative practice, educating students to become reflective practitioners, a term
coined by Schon (1987), is viewed as essential to their development; indeed reflection
is such a commonly used term that there can sometimes be the assumption that we all
know exactly what we are talking about. For the purposes of this article we draw on
Boud et al.’s (1985) definition of reflection as being ‘a generic term for those
intellectual and effective activities in which individuals engage in to explore their
experiences in order to lead to a new understanding and appreciation’. In addition we
note Reid’s (1993: 3) definition that refers to reflection as ‘a process of reviewing an
experience or practice in order to describe, analyse, evaluate and also to inform
learning about practice’.

3
Saltiel (2010: 140) writes that ‘the notion of the reflective practitioner is an enticing one’.
We would go further; in our view, creative practice educators are enticed, entranced and
enchanted by reflection, and we unite in telling our students to ‘go forth and reflect!’
because it is taken for granted that reflection promotes learning. Ambitious claims are
made in relation to reflection within the literature. Much has been written on reflective
practice as a means to promote deep learning by transforming and integrating new
experiences and understanding with previous/existing knowledge. This has gained most
currency as a key part of learning from experience (Kolb 1984). Moon (2010) writes that
‘reflection leads to deep approaches to learning’, while for Race (2003:61), reflection
deepens […] learning. For Osterman and Kottkamp (1993: 19) reflection is:
a means by which practitioners can develop greater self awareness about the
nature and impact of their performance, an awareness that creates opportunities
for professional growth and change.
Susan’s interest in reflection emerged as a result of her engagement with ‘Approaches to
Learning’ literature about deep and surface approaches to learning (see for example, Marton et
al. 1997). She became interested in identifying teaching approaches that heightened students’
meta-cognitive awareness about their approach to learning. Susan secured funding from the
Higher Education Academy Art Design and Media Subject Centre to develop teaching materials
that offer scaffolded exercises to develop students’ reflection as a means to enhance students’
learning literacy (see report at www.adm.heacademy.ac.uk/library/files/adm-
hea.../devpedearn.pdf). This project led to an examination of the different genres of writing that

4
undergraduate art and design students encounter and produce while they are studying. For Susan,
the reflective journals she was developing with students offered a writing genre that appeared to
be particularly suited to the needs of art and design students, arguably much better suited than
that of the essay. This is because reflective writing promotes the idea that writing is a practice
that has much in common with arts practice (Orr et al. 2005). Reflection is about doing; it is an
action. Reflective writing can be, to use Richardson’s (2002) phrase, ‘textwork’. For Richardson,
the term textwork underlines that writing can be usefully understood as a method of enquiry.
Thus, we find things out through the act of writing. This is in sharp contrast to the more
dominant view that posits writing as the thing done at the end of learning. The traditional view is
that a student does research and then she ‘writes it up’. Reflective approaches challenge this
assumption because the research occurs in the act of writing.
Jules’ and David’s interest in reflection arose out of a growing dissatisfaction with the
written component requirements that sat alongside the practice requirements on a B.A.
Theatre degree. The written requirements were an inadequate mode to capture the
extraordinary learning that they were witnessing as pedagogues. For Jules this was
further crystallized by engaging in a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice
course; in particular the keeping of a reflective journal, and with David she began to
reflect on the very nature of learning and the relationship of learning to the higher
education industry. Asking questions such as what are the ethics of teaching (offering
learning opportunities) in higher education, why teach what they teach in the way that
they teach, and what is the benefit to those students who encounter them on their
university career?

Citations
More filters
DissertationDOI

Doing language together : collaborative writing practice for design teams in higher education

TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a practice-centred teaching method for collaborative writing for design teams at M-level in higher education (HE) by using Approaches, Practices and Tools (APTs) across three case study workshops.

Ideograms as a Tool for Constructive Sensemaking in Architecture Education

Ivo Vrouwe
TL;DR: In this article, a visual frame taxonomy was developed by using ideograms for architecture education. But the taxonomy focused on ideogram illustrations as the core of a taxonomy, the research aims to contribute to the readjustment of architecture education to the learning styles of today's generation of students.
Book ChapterDOI

Hyper Design Thinking: Critique, Praxis and Reflection

TL;DR: In this article, the integration of creative, critical and reflective thinking practices within a design process leads to the sustained reflexive habits and evolving critical dispositions crucial to design and technology education.
Journal ArticleDOI

Locating writing in design education as a pedagogical asset

Koray Gelmez, +1 more
- 30 Jun 2022 - 
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors identified studies in design education literature with three categories; conceptual and empirical studies, as well as instructional cases, and revealed four major themes with 18 sub-themes in which writing can render the design education discourse.
Journal ArticleDOI

Writing experiments with a lateral leaning

TL;DR: The drawing and writing experiment that I offered at the Centre of Learning and Teaching in Art and Design (CLTAD) conference in Berlin, 2010 is related to my Ph.D. research.
References
More filters

Educating the reflective practitioner

TL;DR: Building on the concepts of professional competence that he introduced in his classic The Reflective Practitioner, Schon offers an approach for educating professional in all areas that will prepare them to handle the complex and unpredictable problems of actual practice with confidence, skill, and care.
Book

Art as Experience

John Dewey
TL;DR: In this article, Seni Sebagai Pengalaman telah berkembang dan dipertimbangkan secara internasional sebagai karya paling terkenal ying pernah ditulis oleh John Dewey, seorang Amerika, pada struktur formal and efek karakteristik dari semua seni: arsitektur, patung, lukisan, musik and sastra.
Journal ArticleDOI

Getting Smart: Feminist Research and Pedagogy with/in the Postmodern

Geert ten Dam, +1 more
- 01 Nov 1994 - 
TL;DR: Biehl as discussed by the authors uses Murray Bookchin's Dialectical Naturalism as an alternative model for defining nature and argues that this theoretical concept allows for the possibility of what all eco-theorists appear to wanta different and less damaging relationship between humanity and the natural world.
Frequently Asked Questions (13)
Q1. What are the contributions in this paper?

In this article the authors reflect on reflection. To do this, the authors share examples of pedagogic approaches used in undergraduate performance programmes at York St John University that re-situate reflective practice within creative practice. For example, the authors explore the creative, multimodal use of a catalogue document that two of the authors used to encourage students to reflect as part of the B. A. ( Hons ) Theatre level 2 modules entitled ‘ performing the self ’ & ‘ artist as witness ’. 

Looking to the future the Faculty of Arts has a series of initiatives that have been supported by their CETL. ( Fook 2010: 50 ) To take this idea further the authors recognize the need to go beyond critical reflection ; to remove the C in reflection and replace it with the X in reflexivity ( Burke 2002 ). 

The result is that feelings of fear, as can be invoked by the state of ‘not knowing’, transform into a longing for, and even an embracing of, this state of ‘not knowing’ – as it indicates a movement/shift within and upon the self/process. 

As in the creation of a performance work, the form of the catalogue document is important, it has to evidence an understanding of the form of the performance in the form as well as in the relationship to the content, which may also define the form, i.e. if the performance is deeply autobiographical and narrative based then the catalogue document should evidence that in its form as well as content. 

Textual sketchbooks and catalogue documents share elements with an art student’s sketchbook because they are typically non linear, messy and unresolved. 

Their case study demonstrates that the authors continue to look for imaginative and multimodal approaches to encourage students to become reflective practitioners. 

In Higher Education it is very common to ask students to reflect on their learning in learning journals that are popularly conceived of as a way to document process. 

The catalogue document now stands boldly in the new Theatre degree, and is itself the progenitor of further briefs designed to enhance student reflection and support the interaction of creativity, criticality and reflection – or feeling thought action. 

These artefacts can operate as a daily activity such as, an identity book and a commonplace book or a cumulative edited artefact such as a chapter book and a ‘zine’. 

The assessment for these modules is in two parts, the performance and a written component, which notionally deals with context, criticality and reflection. 

This engagement directlychallenges Barnett (1997) and Harvey and Knight’s (1996) view that reflection has become an overly ‘navel-gazing’ activity detached from action. 

For Kilminster et al. (2010), this is a key omission because it means that the radical potential of reflection has been dissipated. 

Susan’s interest in reflection emerged as a result of her engagement with ‘Approaches to Learning’ literature about deep and surface approaches to learning (see for example, Marton et al. 1997).