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Journal ArticleDOI

Reflecting on E-Government Research: Toward a Taxonomy of Theories and Theoretical Constructs

TL;DR: Findings reveal that generic e-government applications were explored more than any specific applications, and the technology acceptance model TAM was the most utilized theory to explain research models.
Abstract: After more than a decade of research in the field of e-government, it is now timely and appropriate to reflect upon the overall developmental directions in the area. This paper explores research progress to date by systematically analyzing the existing body of knowledge on e-government related issues, and reveal if there is lack of theoretical development and rigor in the area. Usable data relating to e-government research currently available were collected from 779 research articles identified from the ISI Web of Knowledge database, and by manually identifying relevant articles from dedicated journals on electronic government such as Transforming Government: People, Process, and Policy TGPPP, Electronic Government, an International Journal EGIJ, and International Journal of Electronic Government Research IJEGR. Based on the investigation of the various studies, findings reveal that generic e-government applications were explored more than any specific applications, and the technology acceptance model TAM was the most utilized theory to explain research models. Although a large number of theories and theoretical constructs were borrowed from the reference disciplines, their utilization by e-government researchers appears largely random in approach. The paper also presents limitations and further research directions for future researchers.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A broader analysis of research on adoption and diffusion of e-government reflects that although a large number of theories and theoretical constructs were borrowed from the reference disciplines, their utilization by e- government researchers appears to be largely random in approach.
Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to perform a weight-analysis and to undertake a meta-analysis of findings reported in published research on the adoption and diffusion of e-government. Usable data relating to e-government adoption research were collected from 103 empirical studies. Of those 103 articles, only 63 used a range of different constructs with appropriate correlation values required for performing a weight- and meta-analysis. Diagrammatic representation has been presented using significant as well as non-significant relationships from all 103 publications. A broader analysis of research on adoption and diffusion of e-government also reflects that although a large number of theories and theoretical constructs were borrowed from the reference disciplines, their utilization by e-government researchers appears to be largely random in approach. This paper also acknowledges the theoretical contribution, the limitations of this study, and suggests further research directions for the continued work.

189 citations


Cites methods from "Reflecting on E-Government Research..."

  • ...…was to synthesize the findings from existing research on eGov adoption, a combination of review and meta-analysis approach (Dwivedi and Kuljis, 2008; Dwivedi et al., 2009; 2010; 2011a; 2011b; King and He, 2006; Rana et al., 2011; 2012a; 2012b; 2012c) was adopted in order to undertake this research....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a conceptual structural model of end-user acceptance and use of the GAIS was developed with technology acceptance model as a theoretical background and tested using a structural equation modeling with partial least squares (PLS) approach on a data collected from a survey among 112 public officers in 12 ministries in Cambodia.
Abstract: Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate factors influencing end‐user acceptance and use of government administration information system (GAIS).Design/methodology/approach – A conceptual structural model of end‐user acceptance and use of the GAIS was developed with technology acceptance model as a theoretical background and tested using a structural equation modeling with partial least squares (PLS) approach on a data collected from a survey among 112 public officers in 12 ministries in Cambodia.Findings – The results indicate that the factors influencing end‐user adoption of the GAIS are significantly affected by perceived usefulness, relative advantage, and trust. Perceived usefulness of the GAIS is directly affected by subjective norm, image, output quality, and perceived ease of use.Practical implications – The results are of practical significance to all those interested in this area, mainly the government policy makers and practitioners in Cambodia's public services.Originality/value – ...

137 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A grounded theoretical model consists of sixteen sub-categories, five main categories and one core category (e-Government cloud adoption) and explore the factors' influence mechanism shows that technology driving, cloud provider support, environmental stimulus, organizational readiness and cloud trust play significant roles in e- government cloud adoption.

92 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Empirically examine the performance of the alternative IS/IT adoption models used more frequently in the citizen centric adoption of e‐government systems to provide a trend about the models and subsequent constructs being utilized in this area of research.
Abstract: Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the performance of the alternative IS/IT adoption models used more frequently in the citizen centric adoption of e‐government systems. Such analysis will not only provide a trend about the models and subsequent constructs being utilized in this area of research but also guides us toward laying a foundation for the formulation of an alternative integrated model for citizen centric adoption of e‐government services.Design/methodology/approach – The relevant secondary data from 87 research studies on citizen centric e‐government services were analysed to examine the performance of some of the most frequently used alternative models (e.g. technology acceptance model (TAM), diffusion of innovation|innovation diffusion theory (DOI|IDT), DeLone and McLean IS success model, unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT), and theory of planned behaviour (TPB)) of IS/IT adoption in this area of research.Findings – The findings of this researc...

73 citations


Cites background from "Reflecting on E-Government Research..."

  • ...…et al., 2008; Dwivedi, 2009; Dwivedi and Kuljis, 2008; Dwivedi and Weerakkody, 2010; Dwivedi et al., TG 7,1 28 2009, 2011a, b; Irani et al., 2010; Rana et al., 2011; Williams et al., 2009) approach to identify, collect and analyze relevant e-government publications in order to achieve specified…...

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References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) as mentioned in this paper is a unified model that integrates elements across the eight models, and empirically validate the unified model.
Abstract: Information technology (IT) acceptance research has yielded many competing models, each with different sets of acceptance determinants. In this paper, we (1) review user acceptance literature and discuss eight prominent models, (2) empirically compare the eight models and their extensions, (3) formulate a unified model that integrates elements across the eight models, and (4) empirically validate the unified model. The eight models reviewed are the theory of reasoned action, the technology acceptance model, the motivational model, the theory of planned behavior, a model combining the technology acceptance model and the theory of planned behavior, the model of PC utilization, the innovation diffusion theory, and the social cognitive theory. Using data from four organizations over a six-month period with three points of measurement, the eight models explained between 17 percent and 53 percent of the variance in user intentions to use information technology. Next, a unified model, called the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT), was formulated, with four core determinants of intention and usage, and up to four moderators of key relationships. UTAUT was then tested using the original data and found to outperform the eight individual models (adjusted R2 of 69 percent). UTAUT was then confirmed with data from two new organizations with similar results (adjusted R2 of 70 percent). UTAUT thus provides a useful tool for managers needing to assess the likelihood of success for new technology introductions and helps them understand the drivers of acceptance in order to proactively design interventions (including training, marketing, etc.) targeted at populations of users that may be less inclined to adopt and use new systems. The paper also makes several recommendations for future research including developing a deeper understanding of the dynamic influences studied here, refining measurement of the core constructs used in UTAUT, and understanding the organizational outcomes associated with new technology use.

27,798 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A large number of studies have been conducted during the last decade and a half attempting to identify those factors that contribute to information systems success, but the dependent variable in these studies-I/S success-has been an elusive one to define.
Abstract: A large number of studies have been conducted during the last decade and a half attempting to identify those factors that contribute to information systems success. However, the dependent variable in these studies-I/S success-has been an elusive one to define. Different researchers have addressed different aspects of success, making comparisons difficult and the prospect of building a cumulative tradition for I/S research similarly elusive. To organize this diverse research, as well as to present a more integrated view of the concept of I/S success, a comprehensive taxonomy is introduced. This taxonomy posits six major dimensions or categories of I/S success-SYSTEM QUALITY, INFORMATION QUALITY, USE, USER SATISFACTION, INDIVIDUAL IMPACT, and ORGANIZATIONAL IMPACT. Using these dimensions, both conceptual and empirical studies are then reviewed a total of 180 articles are cited and organized according to the dimensions of the taxonomy. Finally, the many aspects of I/S success are drawn together into a descriptive model and its implications for future I/S research are discussed.

10,023 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper discusses many of the important IS success research contributions of the last decade, focusing especially on research efforts that apply, validate, challenge, and propose enhancements to the original model.
Abstract: Ten years ago, we presented the DeLone and McLean Information Systems (IS) Success Model as a framework and model for measuring the complex-dependent variable in IS research. In this paper, we discuss many of the important IS success research contributions of the last decade, focusing especially on research efforts that apply, validate, challenge, and propose enhancements to our original model. Based on our evaluation of those contributions, we propose minor refinements to the model and propose an updated DeLone and McLean IS Success Model. We discuss the utility of the updated model for measuring e-commerce system success. Finally, we make a series of recommendations regarding current and future measurement of IS success.

9,544 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper presents and justifies a respecified and slightly extended version of DeLone and McLean's model of “temporal and causal” interdependencies between their six categories of IS Success.
Abstract: DeLone and McLean's DeLone, W. H., E. R. McLean. 1992. Information systems success: The quest for the dependent variable. Inform. Systems Res.31 60--95. comprehensive review of different information system success measures concludes with a model of “temporal and causal” interdependencies between their six categories of IS Success. After working with this model for some years, it has become apparent that the inclusion of both variance and process interpretations in their model leads to so many potentially confusing meanings that the value of the model is diminished. Because of the confusion that this overloading of meanings can cause, this paper presents and justifies a respecified and slightly extended version of DeLone and McLean's model.

2,429 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Lemuria Carter1
TL;DR: The findings indicate that perceived ease of use, compatibility and trustworthiness are significant predictors of citizens’ intention to use an e‐government service.
Abstract: . Electronic government, or e-government, increases the convenience and accessibility of government services and information to citizens. Despite the benefits of e-government – increased government accountability to citizens, greater public access to information and a more efficient, cost-effective government – the success and acceptance of e-government initiatives, such as online voting and licence renewal, are contingent upon citizens’ willingness to adopt this innovation. In order to develop ‘citizen-centred’ e-government services that provide participants with accessible, relevant information and quality services that are more expedient than traditional ‘brick and mortar’ transactions, government agencies must first understand the factors that influence citizen adoption of this innovation. This study integrates constructs from the Technology Acceptance Model, Diffusions of Innovation theory and web trust models to form a parsimonious yet comprehensive model of factors that influence citizen adoption of e-government initiatives. The study was conducted by surveying a broad diversity of citizens at a community event. The findings indicate that perceived ease of use, compatibility and trustworthiness are significant predictors of citizens’ intention to use an e-government service. Implications of this study for research and practice are presented.

1,989 citations