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Journal ArticleDOI

Reflections on a Manual

01 Jan 1997-Pmla-publications of The Modern Language Association of America (Cambridge University Press)-Vol. 112, Iss: 1, pp 69-75
TL;DR: Barthes's reflections on the teaching of literature recall some of the major works that punctuate the phases of his career, from Mythologies (1957) to “Introduction to the Structural Analysis of Narrative” (1966) to The Pleasure of the Text (1973) as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: “Reflections on a Manual” was Roland Barthes's contribution to the colloquium “The Teaching of Literature” held at Cerisy-la-Salle in 1969. Organized by Tzvetan Todorov and Serge Doubrovsky, the Cerisy gathering featured other prominent theorists, like Gerard Genette and A. J. Greimas, whose concerns Barthes addresses and adapts to his own purposes in this paper. Reading manuals of the history of French literature as texts whose grammar is organized by a set of oppositions, he conducts a structuralist enterprise that becomes an inquiry into the myths enabling societies to create and preserve their identities. Barthes's reflections on the teaching of literature recall some of the major works that punctuate the phases of his career, from Mythologies (1957) to “Introduction to the Structural Analysis of Narrative” (1966) to The Pleasure of the Text (1973).
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Section franco-arabe du refus (SFAR) as mentioned in this paper claimed responsibility for the attack, which was carried out in front of Dutourd's apartment in Paris.
Abstract: Against the backdrop of the Cold War and its bitter politicization of Parisian artistic circles, author and columnist Jean Dutourd complained in 1973 that rival acolytes no longer settled their quarrels through mocking battles of wit: "Jadis, on disait que le ridicule tuait... Aujourd'hui, ce sont les cocktails molotovs lances par des sauvages hirsutes, fanatiques et analphabetes" (CE 20). He was to receive unwarranted evidence of this trend a few years later (though apparently the extremists were literate after all). On November 13, 1977, a small incendiary device was ignited in front of his building, causing minor damage to a local business. Unfortunately, during the July holidays of 1978, events took a much more serious turn. Dutourd returned to Paris to discover that his apartment had been blown up. This second attack consisted of a 54-lb. bomb detonated just outside his door. The blast propelled the elevator cage through the wall and across his bedroom, leaving little more than rubble in its wake. While no arrests were ever made, a group calling itself the "Section franco-arabe du refus" (SFAR) claimed responsibility for the attack. The nature of their dubious "accusations" against Dutourd suggest a proPalestinian group (or individual): "Nous avons detruit le repere [sic] du provocateur Jean Dutourd, homme de plume au service de la presse juive. Ce premier avertissement aux intellectuels devrait faire reflichir tous les nationalistes revanchards" (Le Monde, 16-17 July 1978, p. 14). On September 1, 1978, the group issued another statement after a similar explosion destroyed the residence of a prominent French television news anchor: "Notre coup de semonce n'a pas 4t6 entendu. Yves Mourousi a paye pour ses attaches et pour l'obstination du fasciste Jean Dutourd" (Le Monde, 1 Sept 1978, p. 7). Despite the SFAR's garbled and inflammatory characterization of Dutourd, he has declined to delve into specifics of the case. He has offered only the same evasive, pat explanation: "Parce qu'on n'aime pas mon style, on me met une bombe."' This sidestep from the political to the aesthetic

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors focus on the teaching of literature at the university through on-line discussion and illustrate the experimental use of the website Learning Literature as support for traditional literary courses designed and implemented at the University of Salerno and discuss how a forum provided in the website was used to improve close reading skills of students.
Abstract: In her article \"Teaching Literature through Online Discussion in Theory and Practice\" Monica Manzolillo focuses on the teaching of literature at the university through on-line discussion. Integrating discussion-based techniques with the predominant lecture mode is necessary because we need to modify students' merely receptive attitude, and help them develop the fundamental skills of reading, interpreting, and criticizing literary texts. Compared to live discussions, electronic communication has the advantage of providing a more relaxed atmosphere where social conventions are less important and this encourages positive interaction among students. Manzolillo illustrates the experimental use of the website Learning Literature as support for traditional literary courses designed and implemented at the University of Salerno and discusses how a forum provided in the website was used to improve close reading skills of students. Monica Manzolillo, \"Teaching English Literature through Online Discussion in Theory and Practice\" page 2 of 7 CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture 18.2 (2016): Thematic Issue New Work in the Empirical Study of Literature. Ed. Aldo Nemesio

4 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Barthes once observed that the teaching of literary history in the French school system tends to equate the history of literature with national identity as discussed by the authors, and argued that students have lost touch with the vitality of literature because it is taught to them as a series of arbitrary, stale categories.
Abstract: Roland Barthes once observed that the teaching of literary history in the French school system tends to equate the history of literature with national identity. Referring to the “classicocentrism” of his schooldays, Barthes recalls that “in the centered structure of the history of our literature, there is national identification. The [literary] history manuals perpetually promote what are called typically French values or typically French temperaments.”1 For Barthes, the history of literature is an object that has meaning only in the context of the school. He emphasizes the objectivity of literary history, claiming that students have lost touch with the vitality of literature because it is taught to them as a series of arbitrary, stale categories. Barthes may be right to rebel against a mind-set he finds stifling for literary studies, but he misplaces his attacks, focusing on what educators taught instead of how they taught. What he perceives as classicocentrism resulted from the efforts of Third Republic educators who, under the leadership of Gustave Lanson, used literary history to construct a French cultural identity. The secular curriculum Lanson helped establish promoted a pedagogy that transmitted a set of dispositions toward literature from teachers to students, and the effects of that pedagogy deserve closer scrutiny.

2 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: In a tense moment during her confrontation with the abbot, the dean, and the mayor of Leicester, an abrupt question is put to Margery Kempe as discussed by the authors, who has successfully confuted an accusation of Lollardy by demonstrating her knowledge of the articles of the faith and by rehearsing her orthodox belief in the Eucharist.
Abstract: In a tense moment during her confrontation with the abbot, the dean, and the mayor of Leicester, an abrupt question is put to Margery Kempe. In front of a crowd so eager to gawk at her that they are standing up on stools, she has successfully confuted an accusation of Lollardy by demonstrating to the abbot and his men her knowledge of the articles of the faith and by rehearsing her orthodox belief in the Eucharist. Unconvinced and alleging hypocrisy, the mayor then takes over. His accusations that she is “a false strumpet, a false Lollard, and a false deceiver of the people” have provoked this trial to begin with, and at last he gets down to what seems to be the bottom line of his discomfort with her in his town: “I want to know why you go about in white clothes, for I believe you have come here to lure away our wives from us, and lead them off with you.”1 How are all of these accusations—of hypocrisy, sexual deviance, heresy, sociopolitical disruption—focused by the act of wearing white clothes? And why might Margery’s sartorial practice evoke the suspicion that she intends to lead wives away from their husbands and homes? I want to begin this meditation on queerness, community, and history with a consideration of Margery Kempe’s clothing, that constant issue in the Book that records a life at odds with most every everyday thing in late-medieval East Anglia.2
Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2019
TL;DR: Navarro-Ayala concludes that Frenchness is often perceived as queer when it exits the Hexagon as mentioned in this paper, and argues that the intimate interaction with the French Other allows writers to not only erase former colonial traces, but also propose postcolonial subversion and new transcultural identifications, where the queer subject from the global South becomes an active participant in the process.
Abstract: Navarro-Ayala concludes that Frenchness is often perceived as queer when it exits the Hexagon. Frenchness, whether imagined or real, is treated as queer and transcultural in the Latin American and North African contexts. Navarro-Ayala contends that possible sites of resistance—which initially appear to be signs of the inappropriate, because of the individual’s mimetic component through self bodily manipulations (or the strategic confusing character, as Homi Bhabha would claim)—provide an unexpected agency to the boys involved in homosexual tourism in Morocco. The intimate interaction with the French Other allows writers to not only erase former colonial traces, but also propose postcolonial subversion and new transcultural identifications, where the queer subject from the global South becomes an active participant in the process.
References
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 May 1994

1 citations