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Journal ArticleDOI

Research and Teaching in Higher Education: Complements or Substitutes?

25 Nov 2013-The International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences (Bonn: Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA))-Vol. 3, Iss: 11

Abstract: In this note we use unique data from Bar-Ilan University, over a period of four years (2005-2008), to estimate simultaneous equations with regard to the relationship between publications and teaching loads. The study shows that students studying for a bachelor's degree are a liability while PhD students are an asset in terms of publications. Those studying for a master's degree may be a liability or an asset depending on the department characteristics. Increasing the number of faculty members increases publications however it may not increase the publications per capita and is department specific.
Topics: Asset (economics) (52%), Bachelor (50%)

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Epstein, Gil S.; Menis, Joseph
Working Paper
Research and Teaching in Higher Education:
Complements or Substitutes?
IZA Discussion Papers, No. 7751
Provided in Cooperation with:
IZA – Institute of Labor Economics
Suggested Citation: Epstein, Gil S.; Menis, Joseph (2013) : Research and Teaching in Higher
Education: Complements or Substitutes?, IZA Discussion Papers, No. 7751, Institute for the
Study of Labor (IZA), Bonn
This Version is available at:
http://hdl.handle.net/10419/89825
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DISCUSSION PAPER SERIES
Forschungsinstitut
zur Zukunft der Arbeit
Institute for the Study
of Labor
Research and Teaching in Higher Education:
Complements or Substitutes?
IZA DP No. 7751
November 2013
Gil S. Epstein
Joseph Menis

Research and Teaching in Higher Education:
Complements or Substitutes?
Gil S. Epstein
Bar-Ilan University,
CReAM and IZA
Joseph Menis
Bar-Ilan University
Discussion Paper No. 7751
November 2013
IZA
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IZA Discussion Paper No. 7751
November 2013
ABSTRACT
Research and Teaching in Higher Education:
Complements or Substitutes?
In this note we use unique data from Bar-Ilan University, over a period of four years (2005-
2008), to estimate simultaneous equations with regard to the relationship between
publications and teaching loads. The study shows that students studying for a bachelor’s
degree are a liability while PhD students are an asset in terms of publications. Those
studying for a master’s degree may be a liability or an asset depending on the department
characteristics. Increasing the number of faculty members increases publications however it
may not increase the publications per capita and is department specific.
JEL Classification: D2, L11
Keywords: productivity, publications, teaching loads, higher education
Corresponding author:
Gil S. Epstein
Department of Economics
Bar-Ilan University
Ramat Gan 52900
Israel
E-mail: gil.epstein@biu.ac.il

2
1. Introduction
The purpose of this note is to consider the relationship between the different functions
an academic researcher undertakes in the university. Scholars at the university play
many roles such as: teaching undergraduate and graduate classes, supervision of
graduate students, research, publications and submitting proposals for grants. All
these tasks take time thus, is there a positive link between research and teaching?
The relationship between teaching and publications has been analyzed in
different respects. For example Fox (1992) considers a similar type of question. In her
paper Fox (1992) assesses two theoretical views about which there has been
considerable, unresolved speculation: the mutuality versus the competition of research
and teaching in academia. Going beyond previous restrictions in aims and methods of
analysis, it evaluates the influence of research and teaching interests, time
commitments, and orientation of the various faculties and their perceived
environments on the publication productivity of social scientists in BA-, MA-, and
Ph.D.-degree granting departments in four fields. Contrary to the mutuality
perspective, the findings point to a strain between research and teaching: Those whose
publication productivity is high have strong investments in research, but not in
teaching. These findings suggest that research and teaching do not represent aspects
of a single dimension of academic investments, but are different, conflicting
dimensions. The relationships are stronger for the faculty in BA- than in the Ph.D.-
granting departments. Fox (2005) considers the relationship between
marriage, parental status, and publication productivity for women in academic
science, in comparison to men. Findings indicate that gender, family
characteristics, and productivity are complex considerations that go beyond being
married or not married, and the presence or absence of children. In a later paper
Hattie and Marsh (1996) present a review of various models of the relationship
between research and teaching in universities, where the evidence necessary to assess
each model is outlined. A meta-analysis of 58 studies demonstrates that the
relationship is zero. Suggestions for future directions are provided, and it is argued
that a major goal could be to adopt strategies which enhance the relationship between
research and teaching.
It has become increasingly clear over the past decade that the question of a
positive link between research and teaching has no simple or general answer. At the
same time, there may well be a positive link under particular conditions. Elton

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: A review of various models of the relationship between research and teaching in universities is presented, and the evidence necessary to assess each model is outlined. A meta-analysis of 58 studies demonstrates that the relationship is zero. Suggestions for future directions are provided, and it is argued that a major goal could be to adopt strategies that enhance the relationship between research and teaching.

939 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Mary Frank Fox1Institutions (1)
Abstract: This paper concentrates upon the relationship between marriage, parental status, and publication productivity for women in academic science, with comparisons to men. Findings indicate that gender, family characteristics, and productivity are complex considerations that go beyond being married or not married, and the presence or absence of children. For women particularly, the relationship between marriage and productivity varies by type of marriage: first compared with subsequent marriage, and occupation of spouse (in scientific compared with non-scientific occupation). Further, type of family composition is important: women with preschool children have higher productivity than women without children or with school-age children. Women with preschool children are found to be a socially selective group in their characteristics, particularly in their allocations of time.

377 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: It has become increasingly clear over the past decade that the question of a positive link between research and teaching has no simple or general answer. At the same time, there may well be a positive link under particular conditions. This paper argues that a positive link can be due primarily to the processes, rather than the outcomes, inherent in research and teaching, and that, in particular, student-centred teaching and learning processes are intrinsically favourable towards a positive link, while more traditional teaching methods may at best lead to a positive link for the most able students, who in the perception of traditional academics are, of course, the future university teachers. This finding, in turn, leads to a rational explanation of the persistent myth of a general positive link. Finally, it is argued that pedagogic research and its outcomes could play an important role in strengthening the link.

225 citations