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Dissertation

Responses in Policy and Practice to Radical Environmental Protest Targeting Key Parts of the Civil Infrastructure in Australia and the United Kingdom

01 Jan 2015-
TL;DR: In this paper, a statement of originality and a table of Table of Table 1 is presented, together with a Table of Tables of Table 2 and Table 3 of the abstracts.
Abstract: ................................................................................................................................................... i Statement of Originality ......................................................................................................................... iii Table of
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Taylor as mentioned in this paper presents a wide-ranging work of interdisciplinary scholarship, drawing together diverse literary, cultural, and religious sources in order to trace the emergence and evolution of green and dark green religions in North America.

129 citations

01 Apr 2010
TL;DR: Gibson and Tarrant as discussed by the authors discuss the range of interdependant factors needed to manage organisational resilience and demonstrate that effective resilience is built upon a range of different strategies that enhance both hard and soft organisational capabilities.
Abstract: Gibson and Tarrant discuss the range of inter-dependant factors needed to manage organisational resilience Over the last few years there has been considerable interest in the idea of resilience across all areas of society Like any new area or field this has produced a vast array of definitions, processes, management systems and measurement tools which together have clouded the concept of resilience Many of us have forgotten that ultimately resilience is not just about ‘bouncing back from adversity’ but is more broadly concerned with adaptive capacity and how we better understand and address uncertainty in our internal and external environments The basis of organisational resilience is a fundamental understanding and treatment of risk, particularly non-routine or disruption related risk This paper presents a number of conceptual models of organisational resilience that we have developed to demonstrate the range of inter-dependant factors that need to be considered in the management of such risk These conceptual models illustrate that effective resilience is built upon a range of different strategies that enhance both ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ organisational capabilities They emphasise the concept that there is no quick fix, no single process, management system or software application that will create resilience

99 citations

01 Jan 2004
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore the factors and processes that contribute to the transnationalization of environmental movements from their origins in the global North to their increasing prevalence in the countries of the global South.
Abstract: This paper explores the factors and processes that contribute to the transnationalization of environmental movements from their origins in the global North to their increasing prevalence in the countries of the global South. It also considers the obstacles that confront transnationalization and their consequences. Its empirical starting point is a critical examination of the development of transantional environmentalism in the European Union, based upon surveys of organizations, interviews with activists, and scrutiny of newspaper reports. Developments in several key British environmental organizations are considered more closely as exemplars of processes and influences that are of wider significance. The character of transnational movement networks is considered, as is their relationship with environmental campaigns in both post-communist and newly industrializing countries in Europe and south-east Asia. Among the factors contributing to the transnationalizatin of environmental movements are changing patterns of opportunity associated with the development of international and transnational political institutions, and social changes of which the expansion of higher education and mass media, and increased ease of communication, are the most important. Nevertheless, the chief drivers to transnationalization of environmentalism, and to the expansion of its agenda to embrace global social justice, are developments substantially endogenous to the knowledge, belief and value systems of environmental movement organizations themselves.

10 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Thematic analysis is a poorly demarcated, rarely acknowledged, yet widely used qualitative analytic method within psychology as mentioned in this paper, and it offers an accessible and theoretically flexible approach to analysing qualitative data.
Abstract: Thematic analysis is a poorly demarcated, rarely acknowledged, yet widely used qualitative analytic method within psychology. In this paper, we argue that it offers an accessible and theoretically flexible approach to analysing qualitative data. We outline what thematic analysis is, locating it in relation to other qualitative analytic methods that search for themes or patterns, and in relation to different epistemological and ontological positions. We then provide clear guidelines to those wanting to start thematic analysis, or conduct it in a more deliberate and rigorous way, and consider potential pitfalls in conducting thematic analysis. Finally, we outline the disadvantages and advantages of thematic analysis. We conclude by advocating thematic analysis as a useful and flexible method for qualitative research in and beyond psychology.

103,789 citations

Book
01 Jan 1995
TL;DR: In this article, an intensive study of case study research methods is presented, focusing on the Unique Case Research Questions and the Nature of Qualitative Research Data Gathering Analysis and Interpretation Case Researcher Roles Triangulation.
Abstract: Introduction An Intensive Study of Case Study Research Methods The Unique Case Research Questions The Nature of Qualitative Research Data Gathering Analysis and Interpretation Case Researcher Roles Triangulation Writing the Report Reflections Harper School

22,208 citations


"Responses in Policy and Practice to..." refers background or result in this paper

  • ...46 extent and why phenomenon can be observed (Stake, 1995)....

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  • ...Research questions that are suitable for case study research include those focused on if, how, to what 46 extent and why phenomenon can be observed (Stake, 1995)....

    [...]

  • ...Consistent with comparative case study research design (Neuman, 2011; Stake, 1995; Yin, 2009) and to accommodate the inherent limitations of a Ph....

    [...]

Book
01 Jan 1991
TL;DR: In this article, the authors reviewed the literature and conduct ethical studies in social research and the politics of social research in the context of qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis, and concluded that the need for qualitative and quantitative data is critical for social science research.
Abstract: IN THIS SECTION: 1.) BRIEF 2.) COMPREHENSIVE BRIEF TABLE OF CONTENTS Part I Foundations Chapter 1 Why Do Research? Chapter 2 What Are the Major Types of Social Research? Chapter 3 Theory and Research Chapter 4 The Meanings of Methodology Chapter 5 How to Review the Literature and Conduct Ethical Studies Part II Planning and Preparation Chapter 6 Strategies of Research Design Chapter 7 Qualitative and Quantitative Measurement Chapter 8 Qualitative and Quantitative Sampling Part III Quantitative Data Collection and Analysis Chapter 9 Experimental Research Chapter 10 Survey Research Chapter 11 Nonreactive Research and Secondary Analysis Chapter 12 Analysis of Quantitative Data Part IV Qualitative Data Collection and Analysis Chapter 13 Field Research and Focus Group Research Chapter 14 Historical-Comparative Research Chapter 15 Analysis of Qualitative Data Part V Communicating with Others Chapter 16 Writing the Research Report and the Politics of Social Research COMPREHENSIVE TABLE OF CONTENTS Part I Foundations Chapter 1 Why Do Research? Alternatives to Social Science Research What Research Involves: A Scientific Approach Varieties of Social Research Steps in the Research Process Why Learn How to Conduct Social Research Chapter 2 What Are the Major Types of Social Research? Use and Audience of Research Purpose of Research Within or Across Case Single or Multiple Points in Time Data Collection Techniques Chapter 3 Theory and Research What Is Theory? Social Theory versus Ideology The Parts of Theory Chapter 4 The Meanings of Methodology Philosophical Foundations The Three Approaches Positivist Social Science Interpretative Social Science Critical Social Science Feminist and Postmodern Research Chapter 5 How to Review the Literature and Conduct Ethical Studies The Literature Review Ethics in Social Research Part II Planning and Preparation Chapter 6 Strategies of Research Design Triangulation Qualitative and Quantitative Orientations Toward Research Qualitative Design Issues Quantitative Design Issues Chapter 7 Qualitative and Quantitative Measurement The Need for Measurement Quanitative and Qualtitative Measurement The Measurement Process Reliability and Validity A Guide to Quantitative Measurement Scales and Indexes Chapter 8 Qualitative and Quantitative Sampling Reasons for Sampling Sampling Strategies Part III Quantitative Data Collection and Analysis Chapter 9 Experimental Research Appropriate Technique A Short History of the Experiment Random Assignment Experimental Design Logic Internal and External Validity Practical Considerations Results of Experimental Research: Making Comparisons A Word on Ethics Chapter 10 Survey Research A History of Survey Research The Logic of Survey Research Construction of the Questionnaire Types of Surveys: Advantages and Disadvantages Survey Interviewing The Ethical Survey Chapter 11 Nonreactive Research and Secondary Analysis Nonreactive Measurement Content Analysis Existing Statistics/Documents and Secondary Analysis Secondary Analysis of Survey Data Issues of Inference and Theory Testing Ethical Concerns Chapter 12 Analysis of Quantitative Data Dealing with Data Results with One Variable Results with Two Variables More than Two Variables Inferential Statistics Part IV Qualitative Data Collection and Analysis Chapter 13 Field Research and Focus Group Research Understanding Field Research The Field Research Interview Data Quality Ethical Dilemmas of Field Research Focus Group Research Chapter 14 Historical-Comparative Research A Short History of Historical-Comparative Research Research Questions Appropriate for Historical-Comparative Research The Logic of Historical-Comparative Research Steps in Conducting a Historical-Comparative Research Project Data and Evidence in Historical Context Comparative Research Equivalence in Historical-Comparative Research Ethics Chapter 15 Analysis of Qualitative Data Comparison of Methods of Data Analysis Coding and Concept Formation Analytic Strategies for Qualitative Data Other Techniques Part V Communicating with Others Chapter 16 Writing the Research Report and the Politics of Social Research The Research Report The Politics of Social Research Objectivity and Value Freedom Appendix: Table of Randomly Selected Five Digit Numbers Bibliography Name Index Subject Index

18,682 citations


"Responses in Policy and Practice to..." refers background or result in this paper

  • ...While case study research can ‘have a detailed focus’, it can (as the present study reinforces) also ‘tell a larger story’ (Neuman, 2011, p. 42)....

    [...]

  • ...Consistent with comparative case study research design (Neuman, 2011; Stake, 1995; Yin, 2009) and to accommodate the inherent limitations of a Ph....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI

16,374 citations


"Responses in Policy and Practice to..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Case studies are also suitable for examining events in depth (Creswell, 2009, p. 13)....

    [...]

Book
12 Jan 1999
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a study of social movement analysis, focusing on the following: 1.1. Is social change creating the conditions for the emergence of new movements? 2.2.
Abstract: Preface to the second edition. 1. The Study of Social Movements: Recurring Questions, (Partially) Changing Answers. 1.1. Four Core Questions for Social Movement Analysis. 1.1.1. Is social change creating the conditions for the emergence of new movements? 1.1.2. How do we define issues as worthy objects, and actors as worthy subjects of collective action? 1.1.3. How is collective action possible? 1.1.4. What determines the forms and intensity of collective action? 1.1.5. Are these questions specific of social movement analysis? 1.2. What is Distinctive of Social Movements? 1.2.1. The concept of social movement. 1.2.2. Conflictual and consensual collective action. 1.2.3. Social movements, events, and coalitions. 1.2.4. Social movements and organizational processes. 1.2.5. Social movements and protest. 1.3. On This Book. 2. Social Changes and Social Movements. 2.1 Social Structure, Political Cleavages and Collective Action. 2.1.1 Economic change, social fragmentation and movements. 2.1.2. Economic globalization and social conflict. 2.2 States, markets, and social movements. 2.2.1. Territorial boundaries and social conflicts: the transnationalization of protest. 2.2.2. State and classes: the conflicts around the welfare state. 2.3 Knowledge, Culture and Conflicts. 2.3.1. Shifting boundaries between the public and the private: 2.3.2. Cultures and countercultures. 2.3.3. Between the global and the local. 2.4. Structural Transformations, New Conflicts, New Classes. 2.4.1. Still classes? 2.4.2. New middle classes for new social movements? 2.5 Summary. 3. The Symbolic Dimension of Collective Action. 3.1. Culture and Action: The Role of Values. 3.2. Culture and Action: The Cognitive Perspective. 3.2.1. Collective action as cognitive praxis. 3.2.2. Interpretative frames and ideology. 3.2.3. Sense making activities: linking values and frames. 3.3. Problems and Responses. 3.4. Summary. 4. Collective Action and Identity. 4.1 How Does Identity Work? 4.2 Multiple Identities. 4.3 Does Identity Facilitate Participation? 4.4 How Is Identity Generated and Reproduced? 4.4.1 Self- and hetero-definitions of identity. 4.4.2 Production of identity: symbols, practices, rituals. 4.4.3 Identity and the political process. 4.5 Summary. 5. Individuals, networks, and participation. 5.1. Why do People Get Involved in Collective Action? The Role of Networks. 5.2. Do Networks Always Matter? 5.3. Individuals and Organizations. 5.3.1 Exclusive affiliations. 5.3.2. Multiple affiliations. 5.4. Individual participation, movement subcultures, and virtual networks. 5.5 Summary. 6. Social Movements and Organizations. 6.1. Organizational Dilemmas in Social Movements. 6.1.1. Mobilizing people or resources? 6.1.2. Hierarchical or horizontal structures? 6.1.3. Challengers or 'service providers'? 6.2. Types of social movement organizations. 6.2.1. Professional movement organizations. 6.2.2. Participatory movement organizations. 6.3. How do social movement organizations change? 6.3.1. Patterns of change. 6.3.2. Institutional factors and organizational change. 6.3.3. Organizational cultures and organizational change. 6.3.4. Modernization, technological innovation, and organizational change. 6.4. From movement organizations to social movement networks. 6.5 Summary. 7. Action Forms, Repertoires and Cycles of Protest. 7.1 Protest: A Definition. 7.2 Repertoires of Action. 7.3. The Logics and Forms of Protest. 7.3.1 The logic of numbers. 7.3.2 The logic of damage. 7.3.3 The logic of bearing witness. 7.4 Strategic Options and Protest. 7.5 Factors Influencing Repertoire Choice. 7.6 The Cross-national Diffusion of Protest. 7.7. Cycles of Protest, Protest Wave and Protest Campaigns. 7.8. Summary. 8. The Policing of Protest and Political Opportunities for Social Movements. 8.1 The Policing of Protest. 8.2. Political Institutions and Social Movements. 8.3. Prevailing Strategies and Social Movements. 8.4. Allies, Opponents and Social Movements. 8.4.1. Social movements in a multiorganizational field. 8.4.2. Social movements and parties. 8.5. Discursive Opportunity and the Media System. 8.5.1. Discursive opportunities. 8.5.2. Media and movements. 8.6 Summary. 9. Social Movements and Democracy. 9.1 Social Movement Strategies and Their Effects. 9.2 Changes in Public Policy. 9.3 Social Movements and Procedural Changes. 9.4. Social Movement and Democratic Theory. 9.5. Social movements and democratization. 9.6 Summary. References. Index.

2,339 citations