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Rethinking Curating: Art After New Media

01 Nov 2013-
TL;DR: The ouvrage developpe un regard croise sur la question de la mise en exposition d'œuvres et de dispositifs reposant sur des systemes immateriels, collaboratifs et/ou participatif, a suite de formes d’art plus ancienne comme l’ont ete l-art video, léon et al. as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Cet ouvrage developpe un regard croise sur la question de la mise en exposition d’œuvres et de dispositifs reposant sur des systemes immateriels, collaboratifs et/ou participatifs, a la suite de formes d’art plus ancienne comme l’ont ete l’art video, l’art dematerialise et conceptuel, sociologique et relatif a la performance, qui, en leur temps, avaient elles aussi poser questions. Guides par la plume experte du commissaire d’expositions Steve Dietz qui signe la preface de l’ouvrage, les lect...

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Citations
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
27 Apr 2013
TL;DR: It is argued that much HCI research leans towards configuring participation, and three questions are considered important for understanding how HCI configures participation; Who initiates, directs and benefits from user participation in design?
Abstract: The term 'participation' is traditionally used in HCI to describe the involvement of users and stakeholders in design processes, with a pretext of distributing control to participants to shape their technological future. In this paper we ask whether these values can hold up in practice, particularly as participation takes on new meanings and incorporates new perspectives. We argue that much HCI research leans towards configuring participation. In exploring this claim we explore three questions that we consider important for understanding how HCI configures participation; Who initiates, directs and benefits from user participation in design? In what forms does user participation occur? How is control shared with users in design? In answering these questions we consider the conceptual, ethical and pragmatic problems this raises for current participatory HCI research. Finally, we offer directions for future work explicitly dealing with the configuration of participation.

308 citations


Additional excerpts

  • ...spectatorships [19]....

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22 Jan 2015
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors used EAGER under Grant No. 1142510 to support work supported by the National Science Foundation under the name of Human Centered Computing (HC).
Abstract: This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1142510, Collaborative Research: EAGER: Network for Science, Engineering, Arts and Design (NSEAD) IIS, Human Centered Computing. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

48 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: The authors have belonged to the Faculty of Arts for this period, before transferring in the last year of completion to the faculty of business, where they had to seek the expertise of the School of Tourism due to the interdisciplinary nature of their thesis.
Abstract: My Dos between 2010-2014 was Professor Daniel Maudlin. I have belonged to the Faculty of Arts for this period, before transferring in the last year of completion to the Faculty of Business. I had to seek the expertise of the School of Tourism due to the interdisciplinary nature of my thesis.

44 citations

Book
18 Sep 2018
TL;DR: This article used the Russian Formalist school of literary theory to analyze the aesthetics of spoken or written language within experimental film, video performance, moving image installations, and other media-based art forms, with the goal of extending these theories to include contemporary concepts in film and media studies.
Abstract: The beginning of the 20th century saw literary scholars from Russia positing a new definition for the nature of literature. Within the framework of Russian Formalism, the term ‘literariness’ was coined. The driving force behind this theoretical inquiry was the desire to identify literature—and art in general—as a way of revitalizing human perception, which had been numbed by the automatization of everyday life. The transformative power of ‘literariness’ is made manifest in many media artworks by renowned artists such as Chantal Akerman, Mona Hatoum, Gary Hill, Jenny Holzer, William Kentridge, Nalini Malani, Bruce Nauman, Martha Rosler, and Lawrence Weiner. The authors use literariness as a tool to analyze the aesthetics of spoken or written language within experimental film, video performance, moving image installations, and other media-based art forms. This volume uses as its foundation the Russian Formalist school of literary theory, with the goal of extending these theories to include contemporary concepts in film and media studies, such as Neoformalism, intermediality, remediation, and postdrama.

44 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2017
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a Declaration about collaborative work for collaborative work, which is based on the idea of collaborative work. But they do not specify the authorship of the Declaration.
Abstract: .............................................................................................................................................. ii Acknowledgments .............................................................................................................................. iv Publications ......................................................................................................................................... v Declaration about collaborative work ................................................................................................. vi Chapter

35 citations

References
More filters
Proceedings ArticleDOI
27 Apr 2013
TL;DR: It is argued that much HCI research leans towards configuring participation, and three questions are considered important for understanding how HCI configures participation; Who initiates, directs and benefits from user participation in design?
Abstract: The term 'participation' is traditionally used in HCI to describe the involvement of users and stakeholders in design processes, with a pretext of distributing control to participants to shape their technological future. In this paper we ask whether these values can hold up in practice, particularly as participation takes on new meanings and incorporates new perspectives. We argue that much HCI research leans towards configuring participation. In exploring this claim we explore three questions that we consider important for understanding how HCI configures participation; Who initiates, directs and benefits from user participation in design? In what forms does user participation occur? How is control shared with users in design? In answering these questions we consider the conceptual, ethical and pragmatic problems this raises for current participatory HCI research. Finally, we offer directions for future work explicitly dealing with the configuration of participation.

308 citations

22 Jan 2015
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors used EAGER under Grant No. 1142510 to support work supported by the National Science Foundation under the name of Human Centered Computing (HC).
Abstract: This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1142510, Collaborative Research: EAGER: Network for Science, Engineering, Arts and Design (NSEAD) IIS, Human Centered Computing. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

48 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: The authors have belonged to the Faculty of Arts for this period, before transferring in the last year of completion to the faculty of business, where they had to seek the expertise of the School of Tourism due to the interdisciplinary nature of their thesis.
Abstract: My Dos between 2010-2014 was Professor Daniel Maudlin. I have belonged to the Faculty of Arts for this period, before transferring in the last year of completion to the Faculty of Business. I had to seek the expertise of the School of Tourism due to the interdisciplinary nature of my thesis.

44 citations

Book
18 Sep 2018
TL;DR: This article used the Russian Formalist school of literary theory to analyze the aesthetics of spoken or written language within experimental film, video performance, moving image installations, and other media-based art forms, with the goal of extending these theories to include contemporary concepts in film and media studies.
Abstract: The beginning of the 20th century saw literary scholars from Russia positing a new definition for the nature of literature. Within the framework of Russian Formalism, the term ‘literariness’ was coined. The driving force behind this theoretical inquiry was the desire to identify literature—and art in general—as a way of revitalizing human perception, which had been numbed by the automatization of everyday life. The transformative power of ‘literariness’ is made manifest in many media artworks by renowned artists such as Chantal Akerman, Mona Hatoum, Gary Hill, Jenny Holzer, William Kentridge, Nalini Malani, Bruce Nauman, Martha Rosler, and Lawrence Weiner. The authors use literariness as a tool to analyze the aesthetics of spoken or written language within experimental film, video performance, moving image installations, and other media-based art forms. This volume uses as its foundation the Russian Formalist school of literary theory, with the goal of extending these theories to include contemporary concepts in film and media studies, such as Neoformalism, intermediality, remediation, and postdrama.

44 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2017
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a Declaration about collaborative work for collaborative work, which is based on the idea of collaborative work. But they do not specify the authorship of the Declaration.
Abstract: .............................................................................................................................................. ii Acknowledgments .............................................................................................................................. iv Publications ......................................................................................................................................... v Declaration about collaborative work ................................................................................................. vi Chapter

35 citations