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Journal ArticleDOI

Review: Computer use by older adults: A multi-disciplinary review

01 Sep 2010-Computers in Human Behavior (Elsevier Science Publishers B. V.)-Vol. 26, Iss: 5, pp 870-882
TL;DR: A holistic view of the study of computer use by older adults is provided, which provides a synthesis of the findings across these many disciplines, and attempts to highlight any gaps that exist.
About: This article is published in Computers in Human Behavior.The article was published on 2010-09-01. It has received 632 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: The Internet & Population.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The main aim of the paper is to provide an up-to-date, well-researched resource of past and current references to TAM-related literature and to identify possible directions for future TAM research.
Abstract: With the ever-increasing development of technology and its integration into users' private and professional life, a decision regarding its acceptance or rejection still remains an open question. A respectable amount of work dealing with the technology acceptance model (TAM), from its first appearance more than a quarter of a century ago, clearly indicates a popularity of the model in the field of technology acceptance. Originated in the psychological theory of reasoned action and theory of planned behavior, TAM has evolved to become a key model in understanding predictors of human behavior toward potential acceptance or rejection of the technology. The main aim of the paper is to provide an up-to-date, well-researched resource of past and current references to TAM-related literature and to identify possible directions for future TAM research. The paper presents a comprehensive concept-centric literature review of the TAM, from 1986 onwards. According to a designed methodology, 85 scientific publications have been selected and classified according to their aim and content into three categories such as (i) TAM literature reviews, (ii) development and extension of TAM, and (iii) modification and application of TAM. Despite a continuous progress in revealing new factors with significant influence on TAM's core variables, there are still many unexplored areas of model potential application that could contribute to its predictive validity. Consequently, four possible future directions for TAM research based on the conducted literature review and analysis are identified and presented.

1,053 citations

Proceedings Article
22 Aug 1999
TL;DR: The accessibility, usability, and, ultimately, acceptability of Information Society Technologies by anyone, anywhere, at anytime, and through any media and device is addressed.
Abstract: ▶ Addresses the accessibility, usability, and, ultimately, acceptability of Information Society Technologies by anyone, anywhere, at anytime, and through any media and device. ▶ Focuses on theoretical, methodological, and empirical research, of both technological and non-technological nature. ▶ Features papers that report on theories, methods, tools, empirical results, reviews, case studies, and best-practice examples.

752 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is found that Internet use is strongly skewed in this age group leading to a partial exclusion of the old seniors (70+), and Logistic regression shows that gender differences in usage disappear if controlled for education, income, technical interest, pre-retirement computer use and marital status.
Abstract: The diffusion of the Internet is reaching a level between 80% and 90% in Western societies. Yet, while the digital divide is closing for young cohorts, it is still an issue when comparing various generations. This study focuses specifically on the so-called ‘grey divide’, a divide among seniors of age 65+ years. Based on a representative survey in Switzerland (N = 1105), it is found that Internet use is strongly skewed in this age group leading to a partial exclusion of the old seniors (70+). Logistic regression shows that gender differences in usage disappear if controlled for education, income, technical interest, pre-retirement computer use and marital status. Furthermore, the social context appears to have a manifold influence on Internet use. Encouragement by family and friends is a strong predictor for Internet use, and private learning settings are preferred over professional courses. Implications for digital inequality initiatives and further research are discussed.

558 citations


Cites background from "Review: Computer use by older adult..."

  • ...…argued that the digital divide will start reversing once those retire who already used the Internet during their labour time (Gilleard and Higgs, 2008; Peacock and Künemund, 2007) and that older adults are the fastest growing group among computer and Internet users (Kim, 2008; Wagner et al., 2010)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Internet use patterns, reasons for discontinued use, eHealth literacy, and attitudes toward computer/Internet use among low-income homebound individuals aged 60 and older in comparison to their younger counterparts—homebound adults under age 60 are examined.
Abstract: Background: Internet technology can provide a diverse array of online resources for low-income disabled and homebound older adults to manage their health and mental health problems and maintain social connections. Despite many previous studies of older adults’ Internet use, none focused on these most vulnerable older adults. Objective: This study examined Internet use patterns, reasons for discontinued use, eHealth literacy, and attitudes toward computer/Internet use among low-income homebound individuals aged 60 and older in comparison to their younger counterparts—homebound adults under age 60. Methods: Face-to-face or telephone surveys were conducted with 980 recipients of home-delivered meals in central Texas (78% were age 60 years and older and 22% under age 60). The eHealth Literacy Scale (eHEALS) and the efficacy and interest subscales of the Attitudes Toward Computer/Internet Questionnaire (ATC/IQ) were used to measure the respective constructs. Age groups were compared with chi-square tests and t tests. Correlates of Internet use were analyzed with multinomial logistic regression, and correlates of eHEALS and ATC/IQ scores were analyzed with OLS regression models. Results: Only 34% of the under-60 group and 17% of the 60 years and older group currently used the Internet, and 35% and 16% of the respective group members reported discontinuing Internet use due to cost and disability. In addition to being older, never users were more likely to be black (OR 4.41; 95% CI 2.82-6.91, P <.001) or Hispanic (OR 4.69; 95% CI 2.61-8.44, P <.001), and to have lower incomes (OR 0.36; 95% CI 0.27-0.49, P <.001). Discontinued users were also more likely to be black or Hispanic and to have lower incomes. Among both age groups, approximately three-fourths of the current users used the Internet every day or every few days, and their eHEALS scores were negatively associated with age and positively associated with frequency of use. Among the 60 and older group, a depression diagnosis was also negatively associated with eHEALS scores. ATC/IQ efficacy among never users of all ages and among older adults was positively associated with living alone, income, and the number of medical conditions and inversely associated with age, Hispanic ethnicity, and Spanish as the primary language. Although ATC/IQ interest among older adults was also inversely associated with age, it was not associated with Hispanic ethnicity and Spanish as the primary language. Conclusions: This study is the first to describe in detail low-income disabled and homebound adults’ and older adults’ Internet use. It shows very low rates of Internet use compared to the US population, either due to lack of exposure to computer/Internet technology; lack of financial resources to obtain computers and technology; or medical conditions, disabilities, and associated pain that restrict use. Recommendations to reduce the digital divide among these individuals are provided. [J Med Internet Res 2013;15(5):e93]

514 citations


Cites background from "Review: Computer use by older adult..."

  • ...Second, to encourage Internet use among individuals with substantial disabilities, technology should be designed to be as user-friendly as possible [41]....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Being younger and possessing more education was associated with greater eHealth literacy among baby boomers and older adults and females and those highly educated, particularly at the post graduate level, reported greater use of Web 2.0 for health information.
Abstract: Background: Baby boomers and older adults, a subset of the population at high risk for chronic disease, social isolation, and poor health outcomes, are increasingly utilizing the Internet and social media (Web 2.0) to locate and evaluate health information. However, among these older populations, little is known about what factors influence their eHealth literacy and use of Web 2.0 for health information. Objective: The intent of the study was to explore the extent to which sociodemographic, social determinants, and electronic device use influences eHealth literacy and use of Web 2.0 for health information among baby boomers and older adults. Methods: A random sample of baby boomers and older adults (n=283, mean 67.46 years, SD 9.98) participated in a cross-sectional, telephone survey that included the eHealth literacy scale (eHEALS) and items from the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) assessing electronic device use and use of Web 2.0 for health information. An independent samples t test compared eHealth literacy among users and non-users of Web 2.0 for health information. Multiple linear and logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine associations between sociodemographic, social determinants, and electronic device use on self-reported eHealth literacy and use of Web 2.0 for seeking and sharing health information. Results: Almost 90% of older Web 2.0 users (90/101, 89.1%) reported using popular Web 2.0 websites, such as Facebook and Twitter, to find and share health information. Respondents reporting use of Web 2.0 reported greater eHealth literacy (mean 30.38, SD 5.45, n=101) than those who did not use Web 2.0 (mean 28.31, SD 5.79, n=182), t 217.60 =−2.98, P =.003. Younger age ( b =−0.10), more education ( b =0.48), and use of more electronic devices ( b =1.26) were significantly associated with greater eHealth literacy ( R 2 =.17, R 2 adj =.14, F 9,229 =5.277, P <.001). Women were nearly three times more likely than men to use Web 2.0 for health information (OR 2.63, Wald= 8.09, df=1, P =.004). Finally, more education predicted greater use of Web 2.0 for health information, with college graduates (OR 2.57, Wald= 3.86, df =1, P =.049) and post graduates (OR 7.105, Wald= 4.278, df=1, P =.04) nearly 2 to 7 times more likely than non-high school graduates to use Web 2.0 for health information. Conclusions: Being younger and possessing more education was associated with greater eHealth literacy among baby boomers and older adults. Females and those highly educated, particularly at the post graduate level, reported greater use of Web 2.0 for health information. More in-depth surveys and interviews among more diverse groups of baby boomers and older adult populations will likely yield a better understanding regarding how current Web-based health information seeking and sharing behaviors influence health-related decision making. [J Med Internet Res 2015;17(3):e70]

484 citations


Cites background from "Review: Computer use by older adult..."

  • ...Research suggests that determinants of computer literacy include knowledge about technology [21], exposure to electronic devices [31], and the type and number of electronic devices that are used [25]....

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  • ...One common reason that baby boomers and older adults use these electronic devices is to seek out relevant Web-based health information [21]....

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References
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Book
01 Jan 1997
TL;DR: SelfSelf-Efficacy (SE) as discussed by the authors is a well-known concept in human behavior, which is defined as "belief in one's capabilities to organize and execute the courses of action required to produce given attainments".
Abstract: Albert Bandura and the Exercise of Self-Efficacy Self-Efficacy: The Exercise of Control Albert Bandura. New York: W. H. Freeman (www.whfreeman.com). 1997, 604 pp., $46.00 (hardcover). Enter the term "self-efficacy" in the on-line PSYCLIT database and you will find over 2500 articles, all of which stem from the seminal contributions of Albert Bandura. It is difficult to do justice to the immense importance of this research for our theories, our practice, and indeed for human welfare. Self-efficacy (SE) has proven to be a fruitful construct in spheres ranging from phobias (Bandura, Jeffery, & Gajdos, 1975) and depression (Holahan & Holahan, 1987) to career choice behavior (Betz & Hackett, 1986) and managerial functioning (Jenkins, 1994). Bandura's Self-Efficacy: The Exercise of Control is the best attempt so far at organizing, summarizing, and distilling meaning from this vast and diverse literature. Self-Efficacy may prove to be Bandura's magnum opus. Dr. Bandura has done an impressive job of summarizing over 1800 studies and papers, integrating these results into a coherent framework, and detailing implications for theory and practice. While incorporating prior works such as Social Learning Theory (Bandura, 1977) and "Self-efficacy mechanism in human agency" (Bandura, 1982), Self-Efficacy extends these works by describing results of diverse new research, clarifying and extending social cognitive theory, and fleshing out implications of the theory for groups, organizations, political bodies, and societies. Along the way, Dr. Bandura masterfully contrasts social cognitive theory with many other theories of human behavior and helps chart a course for future research. Throughout, B andura' s clear, firm, and self-confident writing serves as the perfect vehicle for the theory he espouses. Self-Efficacy begins with the most detailed and clear explication of social cognitive theory that I have yet seen, and proceeds to delineate the nature and sources of SE, the well-known processes via which SE mediates human behavior, and the development of SE over the life span. After laying this theoretical groundwork, subsequent chapters delineate the relevance of SE to human endeavor in a variety of specific content areas including cognitive and intellectual functioning; health; clinical problems including anxiety, phobias, depression, eating disorders, alcohol problems, and drug abuse; athletics and exercise activity; organizations; politics; and societal change. In Bandura's words, "Perceived self-efficacy refers to beliefs in one's capabilities to organize and execute the courses of action required to produce given attainments" (p. 3). People's SE beliefs have a greater effect on their motivation, emotions, and actions than what is objectively true (e.g., actual skill level). Therefore, SE beliefs are immensely important in choice of behaviors (including occupations, social relationships, and a host of day-to-day behaviors), effort expenditure, perseverance in pursuit of goals, resilience to setbacks and problems, stress level and affect, and indeed in our ways of thinking about ourselves and others. Bandura affirms many times that humans are proactive and free as well as determined: They are "at least partial architects of their own destinies" (p. 8). Because SE beliefs powerfully affect human behaviors, they are a key factor in human purposive activity or agency; that is, in human freedom. Because humans shape their environment even as they are shaped by it, SE beliefs are also pivotal in the construction of our social and physical environments. Bandura details over two decades of research confirming that SE is modifiable via mastery experiences, vicarious learning, verbal persuasion, and interpretation of physiological states, and that modified SE strongly and consistently predicts outcomes. SE beliefs, then, are central to human self-determination. STRENGTHS One major strength of Self-Efficacy is Bandura's ability to deftly dance from forest to trees and back again to forest, using specific, human examples and concrete situations to highlight his major theoretical premises, to which he then returns. …

46,839 citations


"Review: Computer use by older adult..." refers methods in this paper

  • ...Further, since SCT provides a basis for behavior intervention strategies (Bandura, 1997), we use the concepts of SCT to illustrate potential ways to encourage computer use by older adults....

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Book
01 Jan 1986
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a comprehensive theory of human motivation and action from a social cognitive perspective, and address the prominent roles played by cognitive vicarious self regulatory and self reflective processes in psychosocial functioning emphasizing reciprocal causation through the interplay of cognitive behavioral and environmental factors.
Abstract: bandura a 1986 social foundation of thought and, presents a comprehensive theory of human motivation and action from a social cognitive perspective this insightful text addresses the prominent roles played by cognitive vicarious self regulatory and self reflective processes in psychosocial functioning emphasizes reciprocal causation through the interplay of cognitive behavioral and environmental factors and systematically applies the, presents a comprehensive theory of human motivation and action from a social cognitive perspective this insightful text addresses the prominent roles played by cognitive vicarious self regulatory and self reflective processes in psychosocial functioning emphasizes reciprocal causation through the interplay of cognitive behavioral and environmental factors and systematically applies the,

9,060 citations


Additional excerpts

  • ...Developed by Albert Bandura (Bandura, 1986), the roots of SCT lie in the domain of social learning theory....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Self-efficacy represents an important individual trait, which moderates organizational influences on an individual's decision to use computers, and is important to the successful implementation of systems in organizations.
Abstract: This paper discusses the role of individuals' beliefs about their abilities to competently use computers (computer self-efficacy) in the determination of computer use. A survey of Canadian managers and professionals was conducted to develop and validate a measure of computer self-efficacy and to assess both its impacts and antecedents. Computer self- efficacy was found to exert a significant influence on individuals' expectations of the outcomes of using computers, their emotional reactions to computers (affect and anxiety), as well as their actual computer use. An individual's self-efficacy and outcome expecta- tions were found to be positively influenced by the encouragement of others in their work group, as well as others' use of computers. Thus, self-efficacy represents an important individual trait, which moderates organizational influences (such as encouragement and support) on an individual's decision to use computers. Understanding self-efficacy, then, is important to the successful implementation of systems in organizations. The existence of a reliable and valid measure of self-efficacy makes assessment possible and should have implications for organizational support, training, and implementation.

5,717 citations


"Review: Computer use by older adult..." refers background in this paper

  • ...SCT is ‘‘based on the premise that environmental influences such as social pressures or unique situational characteristics, cognitive and other personal factors including personality as well as demographic characteristics, and behavior are reciprocally determined” (Compeau & Higgins, 1995)....

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  • ...Further, adults over 50 years of age make up the fastest growing segment of the workforce (Kooij, deLange, Jansen, & Dikkers, 2008), where workers are often using computers on a daily basis to perform their jobs (Nord, McCubbins, & Nord, 2006)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Heuristics for reinvigorating the quest for validation in IS research via content/construct validity, reliability, manipulation validity, and statistical conclusion validity are suggested and new guidelines for validation and new research directions are offered.
Abstract: The issue of whether IS positivist researchers were validating their instruments sufficiently was initially raised fifteen years ago. Rigor in IS research is still one of the critical scientific issues facing the field. Without solid validation of the instruments that are used to gather data on which findings and interpretations are based, the very scientific basis of the profession is threatened. This study builds on four prior retrospectives of IS research that conclude that IS positivist researchers continue to face major barriers in instrument, statistical, and other forms of validation. It goes beyond these studies by offering analyses of the state-of-the-art of research validities and deriving specific heuristics for research practice in the validities. Some of these heuristics will, no doubt, be controversial. But we believe that it is time for the IS academic profession to bring such issues into the open for community debate. This article is a first step in that direction. Based on our interpretation of the importance of a long list of validities, this paper suggests heuristics for reinvigorating the quest for validation in IS research via content/construct validity, reliability, manipulation validity, and statistical conclusion validity. New guidelines for validation and new research directions are offered.

2,644 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Overall, the findings provide strong confirmation that both self-efficacy and outcome expectations impact on an individual's affective and behavioral reactions to information technology.
Abstract: A model, based on Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory, was developed to test the influence of computer self-efficacy, outcome expectations, affect, and anxiety on computer usage The model was tested using longitudinal data gathered from 394 end users over a one-year interval Significant relationships were found between computer self-efficacy and outcome expectations, and between self-efficacy and affect and anxiety and use Performance outcomes were found to influence affect and use, while affect was significantly related to use Overall, the findings provide strong confirmation that both self-efficacy and outcome expectations impact on an individual's affective and behavioral reactions to information technology

2,480 citations


"Review: Computer use by older adult..." refers background in this paper

  • ...(For example, see Compeau, Higgins, and Huff (1999) and Bolt, Killough, and Koh (2001))....

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