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DOI

Rhetoric, Comedy, or Shock? Bruce Gilley’s Case of Anachronism

Laleh Atashi1
01 Nov 2016-Vol. 5, pp 65-70
About: The article was published on 2016-11-01 and is currently open access. It has received None citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Anachronism & Comedy.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examines the nature and impact of the most extensive propaganda campaign mounted in a British West African colony during the Second World War and concludes that the propaganda drive used in the war mobilization provided a pool of experienced propagandists and a successful structural model which proved valuable both to post-war governments charged with pre-independence political education, community development and public services.
Abstract: This article examines the nature and impact of the most extensive propaganda campaign mounted in a British West African colony during the Second World War. An avalanche of war information and appeals to the people of the Gold Coast was channelled through a new communications network which included radio broadcasting, information bureaux, and mobile cinema presentations. The innovative wartime publicity scheme was not enough to produce a completely voluntary war effort; however, the campaign was responsible for irreversibly changing mass communications techniques in the territory. The propaganda drive used in the war mobilization provided a pool of experienced propagandists and a successful structural model which proved valuable both to post-war governments charged with pre-independence political education, community development and public services, and, somewhat ironically, to anti-colonialist post-war party politics.

30 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: This paper argued that the propaganda war in the colonies was simply an extension or replication of the war in Europe, to which colonized peoples made minimal input and over which they had no control.
Abstract: Imperial propaganda during the Second World is often construed as discourse produced in the metropolises of Europe and extended to the colonies to shore up local support for the war. This suggests that the propaganda war in the colonies was simply an extension or replication of the propaganda war in Europe, to which colonized peoples made minimal input and over which they had no control. This paper argues that West Africans were not just receivers and replicators of colonial war propaganda. The colonies were also sites for the production of imperial war propaganda and Africans were central to colonial propaganda machinery. The role of Africans in the making of colonial war propaganda is particularly evident in the paradoxical effect that war propaganda had on the politics of decolonisation in British West Africa. War propaganda provided an opportunity for Britain to rally the support of her West African subjects against what was presented as a dreaded common enemy. However, the war also provided new opportunities for emergent West African elites to articulate their nationalist demands on a world stage drawing on the same discourses about freedom and self-determination that underlined imperial war propaganda.

20 citations