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Proceedings ArticleDOI

Role of Wetland Soil Bacteria in Enhancing the Phytoremediation Process through Bioavailability Phenomenon

16 May 2019-pp 1-10

About: The article was published on 2019-05-16. It has received 4 citation(s) till now. The article focuses on the topic(s): Phytoremediation.
Topics: Phytoremediation (56%)
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Results suggesting that rhizobacteria has good potential to restore Fe and Al contaminated water in general and particularly for mining wastewater are suggested.
Abstract: Pilot-scale constructed wetlands planted with Scirpus grossus, were used to investigate the effects of applying a three-rhizobacterial consortium (Bacillus cereus strain NII, Bacillus subtilis strain NII and Brevibacterium sp. strain NII) on the growth of S. grossus and also on the accumulation of iron (Fe) and aluminium (Al) in S. grossus. The experiment includes constructed wetlands with the addition of 2% of the consortium rhizobacteria and without the consortium rhizobacteria addition (acting as control). During each sampling day (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 42, 72 and 102), plant height, concentration of Fe and Al and sand microbial community were investigated. The results for the constructed wetland with the addition of consortium rhizobacteria showed the growth of S. grossus increased significantly at 26% and 29% for plant height and dry weight, respectively. While the accumulation of Fe and Al in S. grossus were enhanced about 48% and 19% respectively. To conclude, the addition of the rhizobacteria consortium has enhanced both the growth of S. grossus and the metal accumulation. These results suggesting that rhizobacteria has good potential to restore Fe and Al contaminated water in general and particularly for mining wastewater.

24 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Sep 2020-Heliyon
TL;DR: Development of the design of the ex-situ soil phytoremediation reactors is suggested as a future research direction because it can significantly enhance the current obtained finding.
Abstract: This research analyses the performance of bacteria-assisted phytoremediation of aluminium (Al)-contaminated soil using native Indonesian plants namely, Scirpus grossus and Thypa angustifolia. A range finding test (RFT) was carried out for 14 days to obtain the tolerable Al concentration for both plants. A total of 2% and 5% (v/v) of Vibrio alginolyticus were bioaugmented during the 28-day phytoremediation test to enhance the overall Al removal. Result of the RFT showed that both plants can tolerate up to 500 mg/kg Al concentration. The addition of V. alginolyticus to the reactors resulted in a significant increment of Al removal from the contaminated soil (p

12 citations


Cites background from "Role of Wetland Soil Bacteria in En..."

  • ...which can then be extracted by plants (Mohan and Tippa, 2019)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Pharmaceutical compounds in wastewater are currently becoming emerging concern as the utilization of drugs in anthropogenic activities. This research analyzed the effectiveness of pilot-scale vertical subsurface flow constructed wetland (VSSFCW) planted with Scirpus grossus using an aeration system for simultaneous removal of ibuprofen, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and nutrients (NH3-N, NO3-N, and PO4-P) from domestic wastewater. The constructed wetland (CW) platforms (500 L capacity) filled with gravel and sand and planted with native species of S. grossus were used to treat pharmaceutical content in domestic wastewater continuously for 21 days. Three experiments were performed with hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 3, 4 and 5 days. Aeration rates of 0, 1, and 2 L/min were employed for each HRT. The combined effect of HRT, exposure period, and aeration to simultaneously remove ibuprofen, organic materials, and nutrients were examined statistically using Two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test. Filtration and adsorption mechanisms of ibuprofen compound by sand medium matrix were proven to occur using solid phase extraction method. The removal efficiency of ibuprofen and COD were dependent on the applied aeration and HRT (p

6 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 2021-Chemosphere
TL;DR: The greenhouse phytotoxicity experiment was conducted to analyse and assess the capability of Scirpus mucronatus (L.) in tolerating and removing petrol in contaminated soil and confirmed that petrol was absorbed by the plant, as shown by the increased carbon content in the plant's root and stem after the treatment.
Abstract: The greenhouse phytotoxicity experiment was conducted to analyse and assess the capability of Scirpus mucronatus (L.) in tolerating and removing petrol in contaminated soil. This research was conducted for 72 days by using 5, 10 and 30 g/kg petrol as soil contaminants. Results showed that the system planted with S. mucronatus (L.) had high potential to treat the 10 g/kg petrol-contaminated soil and had an average Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon (TPH) removal of 82.1%. At 5 and 30 g/kg petrol, the planted system removed 74.9% and 75.8% TPH, respectively. The petrol (10 g/kg) affected the plant growth positively, which was indicated by the increase in dry and wet weights throughout the research period. The removal of the TPH in the system was performed because of the interaction of plants and rhizobacteria. SEM showed that a high concentration of petrol (30 g/kg) affected the plant tissue negatively, as indicated by the altered structures of the root and stem cells. EDX results also confirmed that petrol was absorbed by the plant, as shown by the increased carbon content in the plant’s root and stem after the treatment.

5 citations


References
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01 Jan 1989-
TL;DR: Phytochemical studies suggest that hyperaccumulation is closely linked to the mechanism of metal tolerance involved in the successful colonization of metalliferous and otherwise phytotoxic soils.
Abstract: This paper reviews the plant geography, ecology, metal tolerance and phytochcmistry of terrestrial higher plants which arc able to accumulate metallic elements in their dry matter to an exceptional degree. The review is limited to the elements Co, Cu, Cr, Pb. Mn. Ni and Zn. Hyperaccumulators of Co, Cu, Cr, Pb and Ni arc here defined as plants containing over 1000 u.g/g (ppm) of any of these elements in the dry matter; for Mn and Zn, the criterion is 10,000 u.g/g (1%). A unifying feature of hypcraccumula ting plants is their general restriction to mineralized soils and specific rock types. Lists of hypcraccumula ting species arc presented for the elements considered. These suggest that the phenomenon is widespread throughout the plant kingdom. For example, 145 hyper-accumulators of nickel are reported: these arc distributed among 6 supcrordcrs, 17 orders, and 22 families and include herbs, shrubs and trees from both the temperate and tropical zones. Although some phylogcnetic relationships emerge, the evolutionary significance of metal hyperaccumulation remains obscure. Phytochemical studies however suggest that hyperaccumulation is closely linked to the mechanism of metal tolerance involved in the successful colonization of metalliferous and otherwise phytotoxic soils. The potentialities of hyperaccumula ting plants in biorccovcry and soil detoxification arc indicated.

2,257 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Christopher S. Cobbett1Institutions (1)
01 Jul 2000-Plant Physiology
TL;DR: Plants respond to heavy metal toxicity in a variety of different ways, including immobilization, exclusion, chelation and compartmentalization of the metal ions, and the expression of more general stress response mechanisms such as ethylene and stress proteins.
Abstract: Plants respond to heavy metal toxicity in a variety of different ways. Such responses include immobilization, exclusion, chelation and compartmentalization of the metal ions, and the expression of more general stress response mechanisms such as ethylene and stress proteins. These mechanisms have

1,266 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Nicoletta Rascio1, Flavia Navari-Izzo2Institutions (2)
01 Feb 2011-Plant Science
TL;DR: An overview of literature discussing the phytoremediation capacity of hyperaccumulators to clean up soils contaminated with heavy metals and the possibility of using these plants in phytomining is presented.
Abstract: The term “hyperaccumulator” describes a number of plants that belong to distantly related families, but share the ability to grow on metalliferous soils and to accumulate extraordinarily high amounts of heavy metals in the aerial organs, far in excess of the levels found in the majority of species, without suffering phytotoxic effects. Three basic hallmarks distinguish hyperaccumulators from related non-hyperaccumulating taxa: a strongly enhanced rate of heavy metal uptake, a faster root-to-shoot translocation and a greater ability to detoxify and sequester heavy metals in leaves. An interesting breakthrough that has emerged from comparative physiological and molecular analyses of hyperaccumulators and related non-hyperaccumulators is that most key steps of hyperaccumulation rely on different regulation and expression of genes found in both kinds of plants. In particular, a determinant role in driving the uptake, translocation to leaves and, finally, sequestration in vacuoles or cell walls of great amounts of heavy metals, is played in hyperaccumulators by constitutive overexpression of genes encoding transmembrane transporters, such as members of ZIP, HMA, MATE, YSL and MTP families. Among the hypotheses proposed to explain the function of hyperaccumulation, most evidence has supported the “elemental defence” hypothesis, which states that plants hyperaccumulate heavy metals as a defence mechanism against natural enemies, such as herbivores. According to the more recent hypothesis of “joint effects”, heavy metals can operate in concert with organic defensive compounds leading to enhanced plant defence overall. Heavy metal contaminated soils pose an increasing problem to human and animal health. Using plants that hyperaccumulate specific metals in cleanup efforts appeared over the last 20 years. Metal accumulating species can be used for phytoremediation (removal of contaminant from soils) or phytomining (growing plants to harvest the metals). In addition, as many of the metals that can be hyperaccumulated are also essential nutrients, food fortification and phytoremediation might be considered two sides of the same coin. An overview of literature discussing the phytoremediation capacity of hyperaccumulators to clean up soils contaminated with heavy metals and the possibility of using these plants in phytomining is presented. © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

1,231 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Bernard R. Glick1Institutions (1)
TL;DR: It is argued that the ability of plant growth-promoting bacteria that produce 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase to lower plant ethylene levels, often a result of various stresses, is a key component in the efficacious functioning of these bacteria.
Abstract: To feed all of the world's people, it is necessary to sustainably increase agricultural productivity. One way to do this is through the increased use of plant growth-promoting bacteria; recently, scientists have developed a more profound understanding of the mechanisms employed by these bacteria to facilitate plant growth. Here, it is argued that the ability of plant growth-promoting bacteria that produce 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase to lower plant ethylene levels, often a result of various stresses, is a key component in the efficacious functioning of these bacteria. The optimal functioning of these bacteria includes the synergistic interaction between ACC deaminase and both plant and bacterial auxin, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). These bacteria not only directly promote plant growth, they also protect plants against flooding, drought, salt, flower wilting, metals, organic contaminants, and both bacterial and fungal pathogens. While a considerable amount of both basic and applied work remains to be done before ACC deaminase-producing plant growth-promoting bacteria become a mainstay of plant agriculture, the evidence indicates that with the expected shift from chemicals to soil bacteria, the world is on the verge of a major paradigm shift in plant agriculture.

1,153 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The role of plant growth promoting rhizo- and/or endophytic bacteria in accelerating phytoremediation derived benefits in extensive tables and elaborate schematic sketches is highlighted.
Abstract: Technogenic activities (industrial—plastic, textiles, microelectronics, wood preservatives; mining—mine refuse, tailings, smelting; agrochemicals—chemical fertilizers, farm yard manure, pesticides; aerosols—pyrometallurgical and automobile exhausts; biosolids—sewage sludge, domestic waste; fly ash—coal combustion products) are the primary sources of heavy metal contamination and pollution in the environment in addition to geogenic sources. During the last two decades, bioremediation has emerged as a potential tool to clean up the metal-contaminated/polluted environment. Exclusively derived processes by plants alone (phytoremediation) are time-consuming. Further, high levels of pollutants pose toxicity to the remediating plants. This situation could be ameliorated and accelerated by exploring the partnership of plant–microbe, which would improve the plant growth by facilitating the sequestration of toxic heavy metals. Plants can bioconcentrate (phytoextraction) as well as bioimmobilize or inactivate (phytostabilization) toxic heavy metals through in situ rhizospheric processes. The mobility and bioavailability of heavy metal in the soil, particularly at the rhizosphere where root uptake or exclusion takes place, are critical factors that affect phytoextraction and phytostabilization. Developing new methods for either enhancing (phytoextraction) or reducing the bioavailability of metal contaminants in the rhizosphere (phytostabilization) as well as improving plant establishment, growth, and health could significantly speed up the process of bioremediation techniques. In this review, we have highlighted the role of plant growth promoting rhizo- and/or endophytic bacteria in accelerating phytoremediation derived benefits in extensive tables and elaborate schematic sketches.

797 citations


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