scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Book

Romanticism and the forms of ruin

01 Jan 1981-
About: The article was published on 1981-01-01 and is currently open access. It has received 40 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Romanticism.
Citations
More filters
Dissertation
01 Jan 2009
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a Table of Table of Tables of Table Types for Table of Contents...................................................................................................................................................... i Acknowledgements............................................................................................................................... iii Epigraph*................................................................................................. iv Table of
Abstract: ..................................................................................................................................................... i Acknowledgements ............................................................................................................................... iii Epigraph* ................................................................................................................................................. iv Table of

45 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2011
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examine Shelley's art of sensuous imagery, or poetics of sensibility, which links his poetry to its ethical and aesthetic concerns, and combine close textual readings of Shelley's imagery of the senses with his intellectual and cultural inheritance from the Age of Sensibility.
Abstract: This thesis examines Shelley’s art of sensuous imagery, or poetics of sensibility. To elucidate Shelley’s concept of sensibility which links his poetry to its ethical and aesthetic concerns, I combine close textual readings of Shelley’s imagery of the senses with his intellectual and cultural inheritance from the ‘Age of Sensibility’ which encompasses ‘moral philosophy’ (ethics and aesthetics) and ‘natural philosophy’ (science). Chapter I focuses on Shelley’s notions of sensuous pleasure and sympathy. _A Defence of Poetry_ is a pivotal text that expounds Shelley’s aesthetic and ethical taste, exemplified by his concept of sympathy. Taking up this argument, Chapter II investigates Shelley’s vegetarian politics in _Queen Mab_, rooted in what I call _(dis)gusto_, ‘taste’ in both its physical and aesthetic senses. Chapter III focuses on aural imagery in ‘Hymn to Intellectual Beauty’ and ‘Mont Blanc.’ Exploring the interplay between motion and emotion reveals how aesthetics and psychology, in Shelley’s lyrics, are associated with the vocalisation of poetic inspiration. Chapter IV considers the relation of sight to Shelley’s notion of the fragmentary in two ekphrastic texts concerned with visual representation, ‘The Coliseum’ and ‘On the Medusa of Leonardo da Vinci, In the Florentine Gallery,’ which illuminate Shelley’s idea of a circulating and sympathetic power that unifies humans or subject with object, alongside a fragmentary imperative within these texts. Chapter V investigates Shelley’s treatment of touch and Nature’s economy in ‘The Sensitive-Plant’ by juxtaposing Shelley’s poem with Erasmus Darwin’s cyclical system of Nature known as ‘organic happiness,’ which is recognised only by sympathetic sensibility. Chapter VI considers the intermingled imagery of scent and sympathetic love in _Epipsychidion_ in conjunction with Shelley’s theory of nervous vibrations influenced by eighteenth-century psycho-physiological discourses, mediated through the imagery of Venus, whose duality embodies the interrelations between sensuous pleasure and ideal beauty in Shelley’s poetics of sensibility.

31 citations

01 Jan 2018
TL;DR: The authors examine the imaginative richness of literary synaesthesia, the use of the terminology of one sense impression to describe the sensation of another, in British Romantic poetry, through close readings of poems by William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, John Keats and Percy Bysshe Shelley, respectively.
Abstract: This thesis examines the imaginative richness of literary synaesthesia, the use of the terminology of one sense impression to describe the sensation of another, in British Romantic poetry. My study of the creative fertility of synaesthesia, located at the interface of Romantic poetry and science, is contextualised with reference to literary, philosophical and scientific discourses and contemporary debates about cross-sensory perception, and it is elucidated through close readings of poems by William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, John Keats and Percy Bysshe Shelley, respectively. Acknowledging the widespread Romantic interest in multisensory combination while remaining attentive to the historical situatedness of notions of 'sensation', this study explores the specificity of Romantic synaesthetic discourse by engaging in close readings of specimen poems which 1 argue constitute rich case studies representative of their author's creative experimentation with the blending of the senses. My close readings of these selected poems illuminate the creative role of synaesthesia, revealed to be a fondamental aspect of Romantic aesthetics, by examining how it lies at the intersection of embodiment and abstraction - between the immediacy of physical sense experience imd reflexive or imaginative mental activity - in order to emphasise its vital contribution to our current understanding of an 'embodied Romanticism'. The Introduction defines the contours and parameters of the research topic, surveying existing criticism on the subject and offering an overview of the history of synaesthetic discourse in an attempt to trace shifting attitudes towards intersensorial perception and its aesthetic representation in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Chapter I focuses on the poetry of William Wordsworth and attempts to recover his synaesthetic poetics from critical neglect. Following a brief discussion of the 1805 Prelude, this chapter examines 'Lines written a few miles above Tintern Abbey' specifically in order to reconsider Wordsworth's belief in the ability of the different senses to 'counteract' each other and the deep 'interfusion' of memory, vision and hearing underlying the mind's engagement with 'ail the mighty world / Of eye and ear'. Chapter 2 focuses primarily on the fusion of light and sound in Coleridge's 'Effusion XXXV' (later "The Eolian Harp'), discussing possible poetic and philosophical sources for Coleridge's synaesthetic experimentation in the light of his notebook entries and letters, This chapter offers an interpretation of the role of synaesthetic imagery in a poem revised over many years, revealing Coleridge's interest in the inherent iatency' of the different senses as well as the centrality of synaesthetic experience to his idea of 'One Life'. Chapter 3 examines the sensuous poetry of John Keats in an attempt to contextualise his seeming commitment to a 'Life of Sensations'. By examining the intellectual fabric of the poem Lamia - notably contemporary medicine, chemistry and geology - this chapter investigates how the corporeal imagination is explored through condensed embodied synaesthetic epithets, such as the fragment 'scarlet pain', in a poem often ironically remembered primarily for its denunciation of 'cold philosophy'. Chapter 4 offers a close reading of Shelley's 'To a Sky- Lark' in conjunction with his Defense of Poetry, considering the lyric's amalgamating poetics through the prism of critical reception in order to re-evaluate T. S. Eliot's complaints about the vagueness of Shelley's figurative language. This chapter highlights Shelley's ideal of a harmonisation of the senses paradoxically enacted by an energetic juxtaposition of perceptual disruption, aptly symbolised by the 'harmonious madness' of the birdsong, which is shown to be revelatory of the divergent energies at play in literary synaesthesia.

18 citations

01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors argue that architecture should be used as a cover and environment for meaning already independently shaped in other ways, and that the productions of this architecture should stimulate thought by themselves, and arouse general ideas.
Abstract: relation to it” (I.84). For Hegel, architecture operates within the medium of an unworked materiality that resists the presentation of ideas. His name for those art forms that exhibit a fraught relationship with ideas is the symbolic. Not only is architecture the symbolic art form, par excellance, but the symbolic is also the most fundamental type of architecture (II.632, 634; I.84). “What this architecture produces,” Hegel explains, “is works which can stamp the meaning on their external shape only symbolically” (II.632-3). Architecture displays an external, rather than internal, resemblance to subjectivity; its “external shape” fashions only a diffuse link to interiority. “The meanings taken as content here, as in symbolic art generally, are as it were vague and general ideas, elemental, variously confused and sundered abstractions of the life of nature, intermingled with thoughts of the actual life of spirit” (II.637). Indistinct and imprecise, architecture performs a symbolic function. In this respect, Hegel’s discussion broaches a problem of signification that it cannot resolve. “The productions of this architecture should stimulate thought by themselves, and arouse general ideas without being purely a cover and environment for meaning already independently shaped in other ways,” he writes. Hegel takes a prescriptive stance in claiming that architecture “should stimulate thought.” His intent is to expand the artistic dimension of architecture beyond its function as housing for unrelated content. Failing this, the symbol becomes a mere sign, a possibility that Hegel strives to avoid: “the [symbolic] form that lets such a content shine through it may not count as merely a sign in the way that, for instance, crosses are erected as signs on graves, or cairns in memory of a battle.” While Godwin would certainly agree that a cross or a cairn may be “suitable for stimulating ideas,” as Hegel goes on to explain, the

17 citations

DissertationDOI
31 Jan 2017
TL;DR: Body Integrity Identity Disorder (BIID) describes a condition in which a person desires to self-amputate in order to feel whole, and the phantom limb syndrome (PLS) occurs when an individual feels (typically painful) sensations in a non-existent limb.
Abstract: Body Integrity Identity Disorder (BIID) describes a condition in which a person desires to self-amputate in order to feel whole, and the phantom limb syndrome (PLS) occurs when an individual feels (typically painful) sensations in a non-existent limb. These conditions have been predominantly researched through biomedical models that struggle to find comprehensive reasons or cures, while a psychological model is lacking. Thus, these conditions insist that we debate them from a more nuanced view, which I approach through literature, cultural works, and psychoanalysis. In order to do this, we must attend to what is central to both phenomena: a feeling of rupture that contrasts a desire for wholeness. This theme will be elaborated through a discussion of the mirror-box, which is a therapeutic device that alleviates phantom limb pain by superimposing a mirror image of the existent limb onto the absent one, to create an illusion of bodily unity. I use this example to illuminate how texts and psychoanalysis involve reflections of self that can lead to a symbolic reconstitution. What this dialogue illuminates is how theoretical and psychical notions are intertwined with physical experience. I begin by surveying BIID and PLS, which is followed by two case studies that convey personal experiences of living with the syndromes. Chapter Two examines how BIID and PLS bring out an affinity between psychoanalysis and literature. The third chapter uses examples to fortify these links by tracing the theme of the double. The question of recuperation is raised in Chapter Four through the work of D.W. Winnicott, and Chapter Five investigates a novel by Georges Perec, which ties together those themes in discussion. Reading BIID and PLS through these works ultimately raises questions concerning what we can discover about how we are constituted through signs, and how this affects our sense of self.

17 citations

References
More filters