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Sasanian Persia: The Rise and Fall of an Empire

15 Jan 2009-
TL;DR: Sasanians were the last of the ancient Persian dynasties, and the preeminent practitioners of the Zoroastrian religion as mentioned in this paper, and their descendants' attempts for more than a century after their defeat to establish a second state.
Abstract: The Sasanians were the last of the ancient Persian dynasties, and the preeminent practitioners of the Zoroastrian religion. From its foundation by Ardashir I in 224 CE the Sasanian Empire was the dominant force in the region for several centuries until its last king, Yasdegerd III, was defeated by the Muslim Arabs in the 7th century. In this clear and comprehensive new book, Touraj Daryaee provides an unrivalled account of Sasanian Persia. Using new sources, he paints a vivid portrait of the empire's often neglected social history and examines the development of its political and administrative institutions. The author also explores, for the first time in an integrated book on the Sasanians, their descendants' attempts for more than a century after their defeat to establish a second state. "Sasanian Persia" is a unique examination of a period of history that still has great significance for a full understanding of modern Iran.
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Book
25 Jul 2013
TL;DR: The authors examines how inhabitants of Roman imperial Syria reinvented expressions and experiences of Greek, Roman and Syrian identification, and demonstrates how the organization of Greek communities and a peer polity network extending citizenship to ethnic Syrians generated new semiotic frameworks for the performance of Greekness and Syrianness.
Abstract: By engaging with recent developments in the study of empires, this book examines how inhabitants of Roman imperial Syria reinvented expressions and experiences of Greek, Roman and Syrian identification. It demonstrates how the organization of Greek communities and a peer polity network extending citizenship to ethnic Syrians generated new semiotic frameworks for the performance of Greekness and Syrianness. Within these, Syria's inhabitants reoriented and interwove idioms of diverse cultural origins, including those from the Near East, to express Greek, Roman and Syrian identifications in innovative and complex ways. While exploring a vast array of written and material sources, the book thus posits that Greekness and Syrianness were constantly shifting and transforming categories, and it critiques many assumptions that govern how scholars of antiquity often conceive of Roman imperial Greek identity, ethnicity and culture in the Roman Near East, and processes of 'hybridity' or similar concepts.

110 citations

Book
26 Feb 2018
TL;DR: The authors investigates the long-term continuity of large-scale states and empires, and its effect on the Near East's social fabric, including the fundamental changes that occurred to major social institutions.
Abstract: Mark Altaweel Andrea Squitieri R E V O LU T IO N IZ IN G A W O R L D M rk A taw el nd A nrea Sqitieri This book investigates the long-term continuity of large-scale states and empires, and its effect on the Near East’s social fabric, including the fundamental changes that occurred to major social institutions. Its geographical coverage spans, from east to west, modernday Libya and Egypt to Central Asia, and from north to south, Anatolia to southern Arabia, incorporating modern-day Oman and Yemen. Its temporal coverage spans from the late eighth century BCE to the seventh century CE during the rise of Islam and collapse of the Sasanian Empire.

66 citations

Book
30 Sep 2013
TL;DR: In this article, the prophet Mohammad's Persian companion, Salman al-Farisi, was described as a prophet who asserted the end of the past and reformed Iranians' memories of pre-Islamic times.
Abstract: 1. Prior connections to Islam 2. Muhammad's Persian companion, Salman al-Farisi 3. Finding meaning in the past 4. Reforming Iranians' memories of pre-Islamic times 5. The unhappy prophet 6. Asserting the end of the past.

57 citations

Book
21 Apr 2014
TL;DR: The legal culture of the Parsis, or Zoroastrians, an ethnoreligious community unusually invested in the colonial legal system of British India and Burma, was explored in this paper.
Abstract: This book explores the legal culture of the Parsis, or Zoroastrians, an ethnoreligious community unusually invested in the colonial legal system of British India and Burma. Rather than trying to maintain collective autonomy and integrity by avoiding interaction with the state, the Parsis sank deep into the colonial legal system itself. From the late eighteenth century until India's independence in 1947, they became heavy users of colonial law, acting as lawyers, judges, litigants, lobbyists, and legislators. They de-Anglicized the law that governed them and enshrined in law their own distinctive models of the family and community by two routes: frequent intra-group litigation often managed by Parsi legal professionals in the areas of marriage, inheritance, religious trusts, and libel, and the creation of legislation that would become Parsi personal law. Other South Asian communities also turned to law, but none seem to have done so earlier or in more pronounced ways than the Parsis.

54 citations

Book
18 Apr 2013
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors describe the inner Asian enemies before the Huns, the later Huns and the birth of Europe, and the end of the Hunnic Empire in the West.
Abstract: 1. Introduction 2. Rome's inner Asian enemies before the Huns 3. The Huns in Central Asia 4. The Huns in Europe 5. The end of the Hunnic Empire in the West 6. The later Huns and the birth of Europe 7. Conclusion.

52 citations