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School based constables: highlight or headache

01 Jan 1994-
TL;DR: Recommendations this paper offers may well strengthen SBC Program qualities and help overcome the challenges it confronts from within the Police Force.
Abstract: School Based Policing, a unique Northern Territory Program was established in 1985. It has had a profound and lasting impact upon youth in Territory Schools. Its focus has been toward proactive policing A major outcome has been the development of a positive policing profile. The School Based Constable Program has been a real winner. Perceptions held of it within other arms of the Police Department are surprisingly negative. Recommendations this paper offers may well strengthen SBC Program qualities and help overcome the challenges it confronts from within the Police Force. The study takes account of issues embodied in this statement of intent. • To provide topical background and a 'frame of reference' within which the project is developed. • To reveal what the School Based Constable Program has achieved, and why it is under pressure. • To consider the history of the SBC Program in the NT, with especial reference to the Darwin Area. • To study the impact and contribution of the scheme's founders, both Police Department and Education Department personnel.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A police-community relations program in elementary schools, called the "Officer Friendly Program", was evaluated by as discussed by the authors, which attempted to increase awareness of legitimate services performed by the police and to improve rapport with uniformed police officers.
Abstract: A police-community relations program in elementary schools, called the “Officer Friendly Program,” was evaluated. The program attempted to increase awareness of legitimate services performed by the police and to improve rapport with uniformed police officers. Males (second graders) who used a “Crime Resistance Activity Book” or had the book and officer visits in their classes were more likely than a control group to represent officers as helping someone in a situation where a crime had occurred. Females did not change their beliefs about a police officer's role as a result of degree of participation in the program. Also, white children (male and female) who had officer visits stood closer to an unfamiliar police officer during a conversation than those who did not have officer visits (i.e., control or book-alone conditions). These results were not found for black children. Previous writers have been either unduly optimistic or pessimistic about the possible impact of police-community relations programs in the schools. Results of this study show that beneficial effects of an Officer Friendly Program relate to child's sex and race as well as to the type of evaluation measure used.

3 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe a study on the value patterns of a midwestern municipal police force, and compare police values with those of representative samples of black and white Americans.
Abstract: This article describes a study on the value patterns of a midwestern municipal police force, and compares police values with those of representative samples of black and white Americans. The data on police values support the hypotheses that personality factors and social backgrounds are more important than occupational socialization in understanding police value systems. The police values are not necessarily representative of American value patterns, either black or white, suggesting that either more differential recruitment and/or more direct resocialization procedures are needed for improving police-citizen relations in this country. Language: en

119 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: For instance, this article found that lower-middle class children tended to give higher ratings to the policeman than either upper-middle or lower class children, a precursor perhaps of the current “law and order” emphasis in adults from this group.
Abstract: Socialization to the legal system was explored with data on attitudes toward policemen, the Supreme Court, and the fairness of laws obtained from approximately 9000 elementary school children tested in 1961–62. Analysis of variance was used to examine differences by school grade, sex, social class, and intelligence. Four models of the process of socialization were also discussed. Lower-middle class children tended to give higher ratings to the policeman than either upper-middle or lower class children, a precursor perhaps of the current “law and order” emphasis in adults from this group. There was also a significant increase with age in the amount of difference between the attitudes of boys and girls.

37 citations

Book
01 Jan 1969
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss a research project which sought, as its principal aim, to establish objectively and authoritatively both what the Australasian public think of the police and what the police think about the public.
Abstract: INTRODUCTION Commentators on the Antipodean way of life have long identified a strong anti-authoritarian trait among Australians and New Zealanders. It is an attitude which perhaps first came under the notice of the outside world during the course of the two World Wars when Australians, and to a lesser extent New Zealanders, gained the reputation of having little respect for military symbols of authority. Within Australia, anti-authoritarian attitudes have more recently been said to account for the average citizen's view of "the police as enemies, army officers as traitors to democracy... the boss as a barely necessary evil and anyone who gives an order as deeply suspect".Because of the Australian's hostility towards those in power over him, it has been claimed that "relations between the police and the public are probably worse in Australia than anywhere else in the world".2 No evidence has been provided to support this sweeping statement, but it is a view quite frequently expressed in Australia, and, in the case of police-public relations in New Zealand, in that country as well. This book discusses a research project which sought, as its principal aim, to establish objectively and authoritatively both what the Australasian public think of the police and what the police think about the public. It begins by looking at the important stages in the development of the Australian and New Zealand police forces with particular reference to placing in historical perspective many of the present-day problems confronting police, and in particular, the problem of establishing good relations with the public. The remaining chapters of the book discuss the results of surveys carried out by the authors on police-public relations and suggest methods of improving relations between the two groups. General police organization and working conditions are also discussed when they bear on the problem of police-public relations and police efficiency. This book is largely the result of data generated from very substantial surveys carried out among citizens and the police in Australia and New Zealand. Because such a large part of the book is taken up with material gathered from thousands of interviews, it is important at this stage to mention the conceptual framework followed by the authors in conducting the surveys…….

26 citations


"School based constables: highlight ..." refers background in this paper

  • ...( Chappell and Wilson 1969: 106 emphasis mine) 2.5.2 Revisiting Queensland Two Decades Later In 1963 following an overseas visit to England by then Queensland Commissioner of Police Bischof, the Queensland Police Department established a Juvenile Aid Bureau based on models operating in England at…...

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  • ...(Chappell and Wilson 1969: 107,108) In the six years that followed, over 2,000 cases were handled with a 90% success rate: Only 1 :10 committed further offences during the ensuing twelve months....

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  • ...(Chappell and Wilson 1969 : 105 emphasis and underlining mine) Voelcker urged that " one of the most important ways police can help to reduce crime and delinquency is by active participation in ... prevention programs through the medium of special youth divisions in each police force."...

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  • ...Similarly Australian writers recognising the importance of police public relations, discussed the issue primarily in reactive terms (Chappell and Wilson, 1969; Milte and Weber 1977; Wilson and Western, 1972)....

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