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Journal Article

Scouting for Girls: A Century of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts

About: This article is published in The American Historical Review.The article was published on 2010-01-01 and is currently open access. It has received 33 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Girl.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examines the reinvention of Britain's largest uniformed youth organisation, the Girl Guides Association, during the 1960s and argues that the movement's leaders initiated a successful reform process that both analysed and assimilated predominant social mores and tastes amongst British youth.
Abstract: This paper examines the reinvention of Britain's largest uniformed youth organisation, the Girl Guides Association, during the 1960s. It will be argued that the movement's leaders initiated a successful reform process that both analysed and assimilated predominant social mores and tastes amongst British youth. In doing so, they forged a modern, voluntary organisation with mass membership that has remained an integral part of mainstream youth culture. Recent historiography has questioned many perceived orthodoxies regarding the social and moral revolutions associated with the 1960s. The renaissance of Guiding, a movement designed as a rampart for the social order, casts doubt on popular portrayals of the 1960s as a decade of youthful radicalism.

16 citations

01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: For example, this paper explored the experiences of North Carolina 4-H as it implemented new policies and practices in response to social and economic changes, focusing primarily on the period from 1926 through 1979.
Abstract: Throughout the twentieth century, North Carolina underwent significant social and economic changes, experiencing a decline in small-scale agriculture, an end to racial segregation, and morphing views about roles for women and the nature of youth. This work explores these transitions through the experiences of North Carolina 4-H as it implemented new policies and practices in response to them, focusing primarily on the period from 1926 through 1979. Originally founded with the purpose of instructing rural youth in improved farming and farm-homemaking practices, the organization had by the mid-1960s begun broadening its programming, instructing young people in areas unrelated to agriculture. During this same period, it consolidated its segregated African American and white programs, a process that failed to immediately create meaningful integration. It was more successful in its efforts to remove sex-based restrictions on participation, a process fully completed in the late 1970s. Regardless of the decade, 4-H agents endeavored to shape the character of the youth they served, reflecting both agents' values on appropriate behavior and beliefs, along with an unwillingness to succumb to societal fears over rebellious youth culture. Along with these changes, 4-H remained connected to its agricultural past.

14 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A music-centered investigation frames Girl Scouts reworkings of popular songs as a form of resistance to the war effort as mentioned in this paper, which illustrates Girl Scouts' patriotism and wartime contributions.
Abstract: In october 1917 Girl Scouts of the uSa answered President Woodrow Wilson’s call to america’s children by producing a monthly magazine, the Rally. Its articles encouraged Girl Scout leaders and their troops to support the war effort by assisting the Junior red Cross, sewing bandages for soldiers, and singing Girl Scout–themed rewrites of popular songs.1 among the magazine’s many parodies, as they are also known, was an unattributed contrafactum—new words to a wellknown tune— of “Yankee Doodle,” published in the Rally’s august 1918 issue (figure 1).2 like many other songs the Rally published during World War I, this song illustrates Girl Scouts’ patriotism and wartime contributions.3 However, a deeper consideration of these contrafacta illuminates how Girl Scouts, their captains, and Girl Scouts of the uSa negotiated contemporary, competing identities of girlhood during wartime in early twentiethcentury america. While scholars have traced the history of Girl Scouts and Guides in the united States, Canada, britain, India, and elsewhere, everyday musical practices are often noted in passing or as evidence of wartime attitudes rather than as subjects of research in their own right.4 This musiccentered investigation frames Girl Scout reworkings of popular songs as a form

12 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the effects of youth empowerment programs (YEPs) on the psychological empowerment of young people aging out of foster care were examined, using a two-group, cross-sectional study.
Abstract: Objective: This study examines the effects of youth empowerment programs (YEPs) on the psychological empowerment of young people aging out of foster care. Method: We used a two-group, cross...

12 citations


Cites background from "Scouting for Girls: A Century of Gi..."

  • ...Youth-development literature suggests that the younger age of YEP participantsmeans they were less likely to have been psychologically empowered at program entry (Freundlich, 2010; Proctor, 2009; Wong, Zimmerman, & Parker 2010)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Informal, out-of-school education encompasses a variety of programs existing alongside the founding and growth of public schools as mentioned in this paper and explores the history of the institutionalization of in...
Abstract: Informal, out-of-school education encompasses a variety of programs existing alongside the founding and growth of public schools. This chapter explores the history of the institutionalization of in...

11 citations