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Journal Article

Scouting for Girls: A Century of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts

About: This article is published in The American Historical Review.The article was published on 2010-01-01 and is currently open access. It has received 33 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Girl.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article explored the role of children and adolescents in World War I and found that childhood emerged as a contested resource in prewar debates over militarist versus pacifist education and examined the affective power of images of children in U.S. wartime propaganda, and mapped various social arenas in which the young engaged with the war on their own account.
Abstract: If World War I has interested historians of the United States considerably less than other major wars, it is also true that children rank among the most neglected actors in the literature that exists on the topic. This essay challenges this limited understanding of the roles children and adolescents played in this transformative period by highlighting their importance in three different realms. It shows how childhood emerged as a contested resource in prewar debates over militarist versus pacifist education; examines the affective power of images of children—American as well as foreign—in U.S. wartime propaganda; and maps various social arenas in which the young engaged with the war on their own account. While constructions of childhood and youth as universally valid physical and developmental categories gained greater currency in the early twentieth century, investigations of young people in wartime reveal how much the realities of childhood and youth differed according to gender, class, race, region, and age.

6 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors consider how Agnes Baden-Powell's 1912 Guiding handbook, How Girls Can Help to Build up the Empire, and texts written by grassroots female “Scouts” sustain space for unconventional girls.
Abstract: This article considers how Agnes Baden-Powell’s 1912 Guiding handbook, How Girls Can Help to Build Up the Empire, and texts written by grassroots female “Scouts” sustain space for unconventional girls. Although Baden-Powell and her contemporaries seemed to feminize Scouting material, Guiding had the potential to turn odd girls into odd women. Wooing both self-proclaimed Girl “Scouts” and a sceptical public, the texts of early Girl Guiding use a double-tongued rhetoric: while they pronounce ideals of imperial motherhood in order to assuage the fears of reluctant adults, they encourage girls’ self-definition through homemade uniforms, solidarity with peers, and career ambitions.

6 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Björn Lundberg1
17 Dec 2018
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examined reports of physical punishment at the national Swedish Boy Scout camp Avatyr in 1950 and found that these acts of punishment related to the Boy Scouts' scheme of citizenship instruction.
Abstract: This article examines reports of physical punishment at the national Swedish Boy Scout camp Avatyr in 1950. The Swedish newspapers Dagens Nyheter and Expressen described the events in terms of bullying and violence, while the camp directors declared that the reports were merely exaggerated accounts of innocent pranks and practical jokes. This article draws information from newspaper articles, Scout magazines and archival sources to discuss how the incidents at the Avatyr camp tapped into a debate on disciplinary measures against children in Sweden. The analysis also concerns how these acts of punishment related to the Boy Scouts’ scheme of citizenship instruction. Finally, the long-term effects of this purported scandal are evaluated, including a call for reform of masculinity and citizenship ideals within the Boy Scout movement during the following decade.

4 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors explore the discourses surrounding the contemporary Swedish Scout Movement and young people and conclude that the youth are not seen as being "youthful" by their own organization.
Abstract: The aim of this article is to explore the discourses surrounding the contemporary Swedish Scout Movement and young people. The method is based on discourse analysis. Newspaper articles about, and leaflets from, the movement from 2007 to 2009 were analyzed. The findings suggest that scouts are described as well-behaved, decent, sinful, “geeky,” young or youthful. The leaflets demonstrate that the organization wants to promote itself as youthful. It has trouble recruiting young people and tries to change its image by borrowing symbols from other youth cultures. Paradoxically, this approach leads to a conclusion that the Scout Movement's youth are not seen as youthful by their own organization. They cannot signal youthfulness by themselves.

3 citations


Cites background from "Scouting for Girls: A Century of Gi..."

  • ...Initially, scouting was only for boys, but a separate organization for girls was also soon established (Proctor, 2005, 2009b)....

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  • ...Together they have 38 million members (Proctor, 2009a, 2009b)....

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  • ...According to Proctor (2009b), the key question facing Guiding and Girl Scouting today is how to keep the same girls interested from age 5 to 18....

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  • ...The Scout Movement is an educational, voluntary, non-profit and non-governmental organization that arranges leisure activities for children and young people, but it is understudied by scholars (Proctor, 2009a; Warren, 2009)....

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  • ...Guiding and Girl Scouting in France and Britain also had difficulties keeping older teen girls (Proctor, 2009b)....

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