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Journal ArticleDOI

Scouting for girls? Gender and the Scout Movement in Britain

29 Jul 2011-Gender Place and Culture (Taylor & Francis Group)-Vol. 18, Iss: 4, pp 537-556
TL;DR: In this paper, the Boy Scouts Movement in the UK was analysed in order to illustrate how an emphasis upon seemingly banal, embodied practices such as dressing, writing and crafting can provide a counter-view to prevailing notions of the elite, organisational "scripting" of individualised, geopolitical identities.
Abstract: This article brings a feminist geopolitics to bear upon an analysis of the Boy Scout Movement in Britain in order to illustrate how an emphasis upon seemingly banal, embodied practices such as dressing, writing and crafting can provide a counter-view to prevailing notions of the elite, organisational ‘scripting’ of individualised, geopolitical identities. Here, these practices undertaken by girls are understood not as subversive, or even transgressive, in the face of broader-scale constructions of the self and the collective body, but rather as related moments in the emergence of a complex, tension-ridden ‘movement’ that exceed specific attempts at fixity along the lines of gender. Using archival data, this article examines various embodied practices by ‘girl scouts’ that were made possible by such attempts at fixity but which also, in turn, opened up new spaces of engagement and negotiation. A cumulative shift from a determinedly masculine to a co-educational organisation over the course of the twentieth...
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors introduce a set of articles that, using diverse feminist knowledges and practices, aim to expose the force relations that operate through and upon bodies, such that particular subjectivities are enhanced, constrained and put to work, and particular corporealities are violated, exploited and often abandoned.
Abstract: Here, we introduce a themed set of articles that, using diverse feminist knowledges and practices, aims to expose the force relations that operate through and upon bodies, such that particular ‘geopolitical’ subjectivities are enhanced, constrained and put to work, and particular corporealities are violated, exploited and often abandoned. The substantive scope of these articles highlights the relevance of such feminist analysis, not as a universalising framework, but as a project of universal reach. The empirical depth of this work, founded upon (variously) a committed period of fieldwork, the careful gathering of lengthy, in situ interviews, participant observation, focus groups, visual methodology and months spent in the archives highlights a complex, feminist ethics of care. Taken as a collection, what we hope these articles make clear are the manifold struggles within feminist analysis in regard to ‘researching with’ embodiment, agency, passivity, vulnerability, emotion, praxis and care.

128 citations


Cites background from "Scouting for girls? Gender and the ..."

  • ...…– actualised via seemingly banal, embodied practices such as dressing, writing and crafting – such that the ‘unruly’ bodies in question become ‘moments in the emergence of a complex, tension-ridden “movement” that exceed specific attempts at fixity along the lines of gender’ (Mills 2011, 537)....

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  • ...Though the ostensible subject matter – the moulding of imperialising bodies – would appear to place this within a ‘historical’ geography, Mills’ (2011) account makes clear that such discourses are operative today, but also that their transformation over time and space ensues not from a top-down…...

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examine informal citizenship training for youth and the historical geographies of education over time through analysing the Scout Movement in Britain and its activities in the first half of the twentieth century.
Abstract: This paper examines informal citizenship training for youth and the historical geographies of education over time through analysing the Scout Movement in Britain and its activities in the first half of the twentieth century. In doing so, it highlights the complexity of youth citizenship and the significance of non-school spaces in civil society to our understandings of young people's positioning as citizen-subjects. Drawing on archival research, I demonstrate how a specific youth citizenship project was constructed and maintained through the Scout Movement. I argue that various processes, strategies and regulations were involved in envisioning 'citizen-scout' and developing both duty-bound, self-regulated individuals as well as a wider collective body of British youth. This analysis speaks to broader debates on citizenship, nationhood and youth, as well as highlighting how the historical geographies of citizenship education are an important area of study for geographers.

101 citations


Cites background from "Scouting for girls? Gender and the ..."

  • ...Overall then, we can see how a moral landscape of youth citizenship and ideas on behaviour were communicated through the Scout Law....

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  • ...…ideas, however, have been subverted and transgressed over time by young people and their own ‘acts’ of citizenship – whether through circumnavigating the institutional system, enlisting local adult Scouters to permit them into the organisation, or defiantly ‘scouting on regardless’ (Mills 2011a)....

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  • ...I now wish to draw on two key features of scouting in order to illustrate these moral geographies: the Scout Law and Scout Badges....

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  • ...Badges also provided another opportunity for the organisation to communicate ideas about appropriate behaviours in addition to the Scout Law....

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  • ...Although each national association has developed their own Scout Law, the majority have remained true to the original in Scouting for Boys: 1....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: For instance, this article examined research on embodiment published in Gender, Place and Culture (GPC) over the past two decades and found a growing volume of research inspired by "body politics" produced over a 21-year period.
Abstract: This article examines research on embodiment published in Gender, Place and Culture (GPC) over the past two decades. We searched using the keywords ‘body’, ‘bodies’, ‘embodiment’, ‘embody’, ‘flesh’, ‘fleshy’, ‘corporeality’ and ‘corporeal’, the titles and abstracts of all the articles that have appeared in GPC since it first began publication in 1994. Articles containing these keywords were listed in a searchable bibliography. What we found was a growing volume of research inspired by ‘body politics’ produced over a 21-year period that compares favourably to cognate geography journals. We also found that various themes have emerged including maternal and geopolitical bodies. In other areas, we identified gaps. Throughout the article, we engage with the question: has the upsurge of interest in embodiment, as expressed in the pages of GPC since 1994, led to an upheaval of masculinist ways of thinking in the discipline? We conclude by expressing our feelings of ambivalence.

91 citations


Cites background from "Scouting for girls? Gender and the ..."

  • ...Therewerealso someminor themes that emerged suchasbody size and shape (Colls 2006, 2012; Lloyd 2013); sporting and active bodies (Evans 2006; Mills 2011) and bodies that excrete (Cooper et al. 2000; Browne 2004 on public bathrooms and Waitt 2013 on sweat)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A review essay as discussed by the authors covers a decade of scholarship developed by geographers who engage with children, young people and politics, and examines the ways in which the field has been expanded through conceptualisation and deconstruction of taken-for-granted approaches.
Abstract: This review essay covers a decade of scholarship developed by geographers who engage with children, young people and politics. It first outlines the boundaries within which the review was conducted. It then sets the scene of the starting points in 2003 of the when and where of the scholarship of children's and young people's political geographies. Section 3 provides focus on a wide range of contributions made in order to stake a claim within the wider discipline of Geography and explores the connections made with, and conceptions drawn from, feminist geography. Section 4 examines the ways in which the field has been expanded through conceptualisation and deconstruction of taken-for-granted approaches. Here, the intellectual value of reconsiderations or innovations of the concepts of scale, child and childhood, politics, agency, articulation, geopolitics and critical geopolitics are excavated and explicated. The paper ends with concluding thoughts and pointers towards the next decade of youthful political ...

77 citations


Cites background from "Scouting for girls? Gender and the ..."

  • ...Vibrant and important work on citizenship has surfaced in a rapid and intense way during the past decade (see Gaskell, 2008; Mills, 2011, 2013; Mitchell, 2003, 2006; Weller, 2007; Weller and Bruegel, 2009; Skelton, 2005)....

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References
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Journal ArticleDOI
Joan Acker1
TL;DR: The authors argues that organizational structure is not gender neutral; on the contrary, assumptions about gender underlie the documents and contracts used to construct organizations and to provide the commonsense ground for theorizing about them.
Abstract: In spite of feminist recognition that hierarchical organizations are an important location of male dominance, most feminists writing about organizations assume that organizational structure is gender neutral. This article argues that organizational structure is not gender neutral; on the contrary, assumptions about gender underlie the documents and contracts used to construct organizations and to provide the commonsense ground for theorizing about them. Their gendered nature is partly masked through obscuring the embodied nature of work. Abstract jobs and hierarchies, common concepts in organizational thinking, assume a disembodies and universal worker. This worker is actually a man; men's bodies, sexuality, and relationships to procreation and paid work are subsumed in the image of the worker. Images of men's bodies and masculinity pervade organizational processes, marginalizing women and contributing to the maintenance of gender segregation in organizations. The positing of gender-neutral and disembodie...

5,562 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Bob Jessop1
TL;DR: In this article, the authors distinguish and comment on three different forms of the institutional turn: thematic, methodological, and ontological, and argue that the returns from any given institutional turn are by no means guaranteed to be positive.
Abstract: The author distinguishes and comments on three different forms of the institutional turn: thematic, methodological, and ontological. He argues that there is a wide range of institutional turns that have been undertaken for quite different theoretical, empirical, and policy-related reasons; and suggests that the returns from any given institutional turn are by no means guaranteed to be positive. The different senses in which `institutions matter' are explored and the need to contextualize the institutional turn, both at more macro and at more microlevels, is also emphasized. One way of undertaking this contextualization is through the `strategic ^ relational approach' with its concern with both the structural and the strategic dimensions of a contextualized institutional analysis. As well as presenting the approach in general terms, the author also illustrates its relevance to the spatiotemporal dimensions of institutional analysis. Eight broad conclusions about the institutional turn are presented.

599 citations


"Scouting for girls? Gender and the ..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Third, this article therefore draws attention to organisations and incorporates what has been termed ‘institutional geographies’ (Philo and Parr 2000) as part of a wider ‘institutional turn’ (Jessop 2001) into feminist geopolitics....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Staeheli et al. as discussed by the authors pointed out the continued relative absence of women in the sub-discipline of political geography, particularly noticeable given the changing gender balance of other parts of geography.
Abstract: Recent debates centring on a nascent feminist geopolitics indite the historical reasoning of geopolitical arguments as masculinist. These discussions have taken place in a variety of settings from informal conversations at meetings of the Association of American Geographers (AAG) to more institutional investigations, such as a recent survey conducted by the Political Geography Speciality Group (see Staeheli, in this issue). An unavoidable point of entry to these debates is the continued relative absence of women in the sub-disciplineÐ particularly noticeable given the changing gender balance of other parts of geography. Feminist and other marginal voices have made great impacts on geography and related disciplines in recent years, but their impact on political geography has been much slighter. Although political geography has turned to an interest in the everyday and mundane exercise of power, it has tended to articulate this in terms of the `cultural turn’ rather than an acknowledgement of the feminist insistence that t̀he personal is political’ . Nor has there been much attention given to from where political geography emanates. Political geographers have decentred the seat of power and engaged in critiques of the orientalism of global geopolitical discourse but, if anything, political geography has become more eurocentric in terms of the focus of empirical research. It would appear that Richard Ashley’s call in 1987 for a a geopolitics of geopolitical spaceo is still keenly required of the intellectual spaces of political geography. However, 14 years later we still ® nd little interaction between political and feminist geography (with the exception of the emergence of some interesting collaborations between political, cultural and feminist geographers such as the Politics and Identity in Place and Space Group (PIPS) at Penn State and a few published discussions such as Dalby, 1994; Kofman and Peake, 1990; McDowell and Sharp, 1997; Staeheli, 1996). And yet many feminist and post-colonial geographers are producing work that is primarily concerned with the politicisation of the world around us, whether the politicisation of leisure, the body or knowledge about peoples and places around the world. This has required a reconceptualisation of the politicalÐ something which political geographers would

459 citations


"Scouting for girls? Gender and the ..." refers background in this paper

  • ...…on the gendered discourses of more traditional topics of politics, violence, protest, mobility and security, but also on new research areas such as public and private spaces of geopolitics and post-human landscapes (Dowler and Sharp 2001; Hyndman 2001, 2007; Secor 2001; Sundberg and Kaserman 2007)....

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  • ...In the process, this body of work has often drawn attention to the tendency within critical geopolitics analyses to eschew such thematics (Dowler and Sharp 2001; Hyndman 2001, 2004, 2007)....

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