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Journal ArticleDOI

Seasonal Variation in Zooplanktonic Community in Swamp of Purnia (Bihar), India

TL;DR: In this article, the seasonal variations of zooplankton and selected physico-chemical variables (temperature, pH, Secchi disc transparency, dissolved oxygen, free CO2, bicarbonate, chloride, nitrate, phosphate and silicate concentrations) in the swamp of Purnia for one annual cycle (March 2007 to February 2008).
Abstract: Zooplankters occupy an intermediate position in food web and are good indicators of the changes in water quality, because they are strongly affected by environmental conditions and respond quickly to changes in water quality. Hence, qualitative and quantitative studies of zooplankton are of great importance. The present study was undertaken to quantify the seasonal variations of zooplankton and selected physico-chemical variables (temperature, pH, Secchi disc transparency, dissolved oxygen, free CO2, bicarbonate, chloride, nitrate, phosphate and silicate concentrations) in the swamp of Purnia for one annual cycle (March 2007 to February 2008). The zooplankton taxa collected from the swamp water belong to three dominant groups viz. rotifers, cladocera and copepods. 26 zooplankton species were identified in which 17 belong to rotifer, 5 to cladocera and 4 to copepod. Rotifers were the most dominant group showing highest percentage (47.38%) composition and diversity followed by cladocera (39.64%) and copepod (12.98%). The zooplankton density in different seasons was in order of summer> winter > monsoon. The diversity of the overall zooplankton shows high in summer winter (H'= 0.964), summer (H'= 0.821) and less in monsoon (H'= 0.789). Density, diversity and composition of zooplankton also exhibited monthly variations. Brachionus, Keratella, Filiina, Cyclops and Diaptomus indicated organic pollution in the swamp. Zooplankters showed negative correlation with pH and DO2 in summer season as well as with free CO2, nitrate and phosphate during monsoon and winter. Further zooplankters exhibited negative correlation with water temperature and pH in monsoon and winter seasons respectively. The study established possible influences of the change in water quality to zooplankton population.
Citations
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01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: Brachionus, the most diverse brachionid genus, is widely distributed in India with low richness in hill states of NEI and coastal waters in particular and inconsistent treatment of morphological variants.
Abstract: We evaluate diversity status of the Brachionidae of India and present an annotated checklist of 46 species excluding dubious and unconfirmed reports. These merit biodiversity value as ~27% of the global diversity of the taxon and ~81% of its Oriental species. We observed two Australasian elements, two Oriental endemics, one Indian endemic, one paleotropical and one cosmo (sub) tropical species. The cold-water Keratella serrulata and Notholca squamula are new records from eastern Himalayas. Maximum brachionid diversity (32 species) from Assam state of northeast India (NEI) is followed by the reports of 27 and 26 species from Tamil Nadu and West Bengal, respectively; 25 species each from Tripura and Maharashtra; and 24 species from Jammu & Kashmir. Brachionus, the most diverse brachionid genus, is widely distributed in India with low richness in hill states of NEI and coastal waters in particular. The Indian brachionid taxonomy is confounded with unconfirmed reports, misidentifications, invalid taxa, and inconsistent treatment of morphological variants, while analysis of cryptic diversity in Brachionus calyciflorus, B. caudatus, B. forficula, B. plicatilis, B. quadridentatus, B. urceolaris, Keratella cochlearis and K. quadrata species-groups awaits attention.

12 citations


Cites background from "Seasonal Variation in Zooplanktonic..."

  • ...The affinities in their composition, result in main cluster groupings between Haryana, Jharkhand, Chandigarh, Rajasthan, Karnataka, Uttrakhand; Tamil Nadu, West Bengal, Orissa, Kerala, Tripura; and Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Goa, Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra, Delhi while homology is indicated between species known from Gujarat and Punjab; Assam and Meghalaya; and Nagaland, Himachal Pradesh and Sikkim....

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  • ...K. valga is indiscriminately listed, without any validation from India, from Bihar (Pandey et al. 2013), Jammu & Kashmir (Sharma J.P. & Srivastava 1986, Ahangar et al. 2012), Gujarat (Nirmal Kumar et al. 2011), Madhya Pradesh (Adohlia 1979), Maharashtra (Tayade & Dabhade 2011), Punjab (Bath & Kaur 1998, Kaur et al. 1999), Rajasthan (Saxena 2001, Sharma V. et al. 2008, Sharma R. et al. 2011), Tamil Nadu (Raghunathan & Suresh Kumar 2006, Sonia & Ramanibai 2012)....

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  • ...BH-Bihar; 6....

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  • ...Brachionus terminalis: Bihar (Kumar et al. 2011)....

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  • ...SONAULLAH, F. (2011): Seasonal variations in zooplankton diversity of railway pond, Sasaram, Bihar....

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Journal ArticleDOI
23 Sep 2020
TL;DR: In this paper, a small urban wetland of Meghalaya state of northeast India (NEI), undertaken at the littoral and semi-limnetic stations, reveals one of the biodiverse zooplankton assemblages (148 species belonging to 72 genera and 30 families) known from any lentic environ of the Indian subregion.
Abstract: Limnological survey of a small urban wetland of Meghalaya state of northeast India (NEI), undertaken at the littoral and semi-limnetic stations, reveals one of the biodiverse zooplankton assemblages (148 species belonging to 72 genera and 30 families) known from any lentic environ of the Indian sub-region. The speciose nature, peak constellation/sample of 83 zooplankton species, and diverse Rotifera (90 species) are hypothesized to environmental heterogeneity of this urban wetland in contrast to the general pattern of reduced richness expected in highly modified urban aquatic environments. The soft and de-mineralized waters are characterized by low zooplankton abundance. This study records high species diversity and evenness, and low dominance attributed to low and equitable abundance depicts ‘generalist’ nature of all species. Rotifera > Cladocera and Chydoridae > Lecanidae > Lepadellidae > Daphniidae are important at both stations, and Testudinellidae, Trichocercidae, and Macrothricidae are notable at the littoral station. Individual abiotic factors exert limited and differential spatial influence on various taxa, while the CCA registers a high cumulative influence of 10 abiotic factors on the littoral (87.37%) and semi-limnetic (75.81%) zooplankton assemblages. The spatial variations of composition, richness, similarities, abundance, diversity indices, and of the influence of individual abiotic factors are hypothesized to habitat heterogeneity amongst the sampled stations.

7 citations


Cites background or result from "Seasonal Variation in Zooplanktonic..."

  • ...…reports of Jyoti et al. (2009), Karuthapandi et al. (2016), Saikia et al. (2017) but differ from summer (Sanjer and Sharma 1995; Patra et al. 2011; Pandey et al. 2013; Sharma and Kumari 2018), winter peaks (Sharma and Hussain 2001; Sharma 2011a; Sharma and Sharma 2011, 2012) from different states…...

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  • ...The selected Indian studies with variable and limited extant of useful information are from small wetlands of Bihar (Kumar et al. 2011; Pandey et al. 2013), Jammu & Kashmir (Jyoti et al. 2009), Haryana (Tyor et al. 2014; Chopra and Jakhar 2016), Karnataka (Majagi 2014), Telangana (Karuthapandi et…...

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  • ...2013), and Myanmar (Twin and Aung 2019) but differ summer peaks listed from wetlands of Bihar (Pandey et al. 2013), Kashmir (Slathia and Dutta 2013), Karnataka (Majagi 2014; Anita et al....

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  • ...…(Deka and Goswami 2015), Uttarakhand (Thakur et al. 2013), and Myanmar (Twin and Aung 2019) but differ summer peaks listed from wetlands of Bihar (Pandey et al. 2013), Kashmir (Slathia and Dutta 2013), Karnataka (Majagi 2014; Anita et al. 2019) and from winter peaks known from Himachal Pradesh…...

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  • ...…higher than the reports from small water bodies of Arunachal Pradesh (Saikia et al. 2017), Bihar (Kumar et al. 2011, 2015; Singh et al. 2012; Pandey et al. 2013), Chhattisgarh (Mishra et al. 2014), Meghalaya (Sharma and Wanswett 2006), and West Bengal (Halder Mallick and Chakraborty 2015;…...

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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2020
TL;DR: The ecosystem services provided by freshwater zooplankton community (viz., rotifera, cladocera, copepoda and ostracoda) are very much significant and valuable.
Abstract: The ecosystem services provided by freshwater zooplankton community (viz., rotifera, cladocera, copepoda and ostracoda) are very much significant and valuable. By feeding on phytoplankton or other members of zooplankton species, they act as primary consumers or secondary consumers, and hence playing a vital role in maintaining the biological configuration of the food web and overall balance of the aquatic ecosystem. Besides, the zooplankton play a central role in trophic cascade mechanisms; therefore, the eutrophic lakes of the world can be successfully restored by the so-called biomanipulation phenomena. Even in the diet of fish larvae, some highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are provided by some zooplankters for their successful development; therefore, they act as a backbone for the successful aquaculture industry. An important role played by these valuable assets is to monitor the changes in the aquatic ecosystems due to climate change and various anthropogenic influences, like eutrophication, heavy metal load, changes in physicochemical parameters, etc. and that too in their early stages. Therefore the remedial steps can be trailed at very early stages to counteract the effects of these changes. Since the overall population dynamics of the zooplankton community is prone to disturbance induced by climate change, which is quite perturbing situation that the overall structure and function of the aquatic ecosystem may not get spoiled.

4 citations

DOI
16 Sep 2021
TL;DR: This study is a useful contribution to zooplankton diversity of the subtropical environs, and soft and de-mineralized waters in particular.
Abstract: Hydrobiological survey of a ‘soft-water’ and ‘highly de-mineralized’ reservoir of Meghalaya state of northeast India is undertaken to analyze zooplankton diversity with reference to the spatio-temporal variations and influence of abiotic factors. The littoral and limnetic zooplankton assemblages of this subtropical reservoir without aquatic vegetation reveal total 36 species, and record lower abundance, quantitative dominance of Rotifera, sub-dominance of Cladocera and Copepoda and moderate species diversity. Keratella cochlearis, Bosmina longirostris, Polyarthra vulgaris, Mesocyclops leuckarti, Conochilus unicornis and Asplanchna priodonta influence abundance, species diversity, dominance and equitability of zooplankton. We report differential spatial influence of individual abiotic factors with the relatively more importance at the limnetic region, and the canonical correspondence analysis registers 72.5% and 78.8% cumulative influence of 10 abiotic factors on the littoral and limnetic assemblages, respectively. The spatial differences of various diversity aspects and the influence of abiotic factors suggest habitat heterogeneity amongst the two regions. This study is a useful contribution to zooplankton diversity of the subtropical environs, and soft and de-mineralized waters in particular. Our results mark distinct contrast to the lowest richness and abundance of zooplankton noted from India vide the preliminary 1990–91 survey of this reservoir.

2 citations


Cites background from "Seasonal Variation in Zooplanktonic..."

  • ...The summer Rotifera peaks correspond with the reports from Himachal Pradesh [8] , Bihar [52] and West Bengal [43], and differ from winter maxima recorded Assam [12,13,53] and Manipur [14,15]....

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  • ...The summer Rotifera peaks correspond with the reports from Himachal Pradesh [8] , Bihar [52] and West Bengal ([43]), and differ from winter maxima recorded Assam [12,13,53] and Manipur ([14,15])....

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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2022
TL;DR: The body height becoming higher during metamorphosis can help flatfish juveniles become more "flatten" after they turn 90-degree angle to settle down on the bottom as discussed by the authors .
Abstract: The body height becoming higher during metamorphosis can help flatfishes juveniles become more “flatten” after they turn 90-degree angle to settle down on the bottom. Such as in Japanese flounder and starry flounder, the increase of body depth during metamorphosis is the result of cell proliferation occurring along the dorsal and ventral rim of the body. And the change of body shape during metamorphosis is regulated directly by thyroid hormone.
References
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Journal ArticleDOI
11 Apr 1962-Copeia

2,110 citations

Book ChapterDOI
TL;DR: This chapter discusses a selected portion of aquatic production biology, secondary production in inland waters, and focuses on three groups, fishes, zoobenthos, and zooplankton, which have received most attention, and for which methodology has been best worked out.
Abstract: Publisher Summary The measurement of production is being employed as an indicator of the health of an ecosystem, assessing the effect of environmental pollution or other disturbance. Additionally, secondary production is of vital interest to natural resource administrators responsible for the management of wild populations utilized for both food and recreation and in inland waters, particularly for vertebrate fisheries. This chapter discusses a selected portion of aquatic production biology, secondary production in inland waters. The chapter focuses on three groups, fishes, zoobenthos, and zooplankton, which have received most attention, for which methodology has been best worked out, and which are of most immediate concern to man. The production of other secondary producers, including heterotrophic algae, bacteria and fungi, protozoans, amphibians, reptiles, and other aquatic vertebrates, such as some birds and mammals more commonly associated with the terrestrial environment, must await further advances and reviews by other specialists. The energy flow through these other groups may be extremely important.

573 citations

Book
01 Dec 1959

506 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The number of crustacean zooplankton species in a lake is significantly correlated with lake size, average rate of photosynthesis (parabolic function), and the number of lakes within 20 km; a multiple linear regression model explains -75% of the variation in log species richness.
Abstract: Data from 66 North American lakes were collected to construct a model for predicting the number of crustacean zooplankton species expected in a lake. The chosen lakes have a range from 4 m* to 80 x lo9 m2 surface area, range from ultra-oligotrophic to hypereutrophic, and have zooplankton species lists based on several years of observation. The number of crustacean zooplankton species in a lake is significantly correlated with lake size, average rate of photosynthesis (parabolic function), and the number of lakes within 20 km. A multiple linear regression model, using these three independent variables, explains -75% of the variation in log species richness. Prediction of species richness was not enhanced by knowledge of lake depth, salinity, elevation, latitude, longitude, or distance to the nearest lake. The North American species-area curve is statistically different from and steeper than the corresponding European curve.

295 citations