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Book ChapterDOI

Self-assembly of transition metal nanoparticles using marine sources

01 Jan 2016-pp 459-483
TL;DR: In this article, the synthesis of transition metal nanoparticles, such as gold, silver, platinum, and cadmium using various marine microorganisms, including bacteria, cyanobacteria, yeast, fungi, algae, and also some marine animals like finfish and sponges, is discussed.
Abstract: In the field of nanotechnology one of the important processes was to develop an eco-friendly method of preparing metallic nanoparticles by using natural sources which are available in the globally. To achieve the eco-friendly process of synthesizing nanoparticles several natural sources such as bacteria, fungi, actinomycetes, plant materials, and marine microbials were used. In this chapter we discuss the synthesis of transition metal nanoparticles, such as gold, silver, platinum, and cadmium using various marine microorganisms, including bacteria, cyanobacteria, yeast, fungi, algae, and also some marine animals like finfish and sponges. Hence, this chapter brings out the application of marine sources in the preparation of various nanoparticles.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the first sign of the reduction of silver ions to AgNPs was the change in color of S. lavandulifolia and Lathyrus sp. extracts after treating with silver nitrate.
Abstract: In this study, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were biosynthesized using Stachys lavandulifolia and Lathyrus sp. The first sign of the reduction of silver ions to AgNPs was the change in color of S. lavandulifolia and Lathyrus sp. extracts changed into dark brown and auburn after treating with silver nitrate, respectively. The UV–Vis spectroscopy of reaction mixture (extract+silver nitrate) produced by S. lavandulifolia and Lathyrus sp. showed the strong adsorption peaks at ≃440 and 420 nm, respectively. The transmission electron microscope images showed the synthesis of AgNPs using S. lavandulifolia and Lathyrus sp. with an average size of 7 and 11 nm, respectively. The result of X-ray diffraction pattern showed four diffraction peaks at 38°, 44°, 64°, and 77° for both types of biosynthesized AgNPs. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed the possible role of involved proteins and polyhydroxyl functional groups in the synthesis process of AgNPs. Inductively coupled plasma analysis determined the conversion rate (percentage) of silver ions to silver nanoparticles in reaction mixtures of S. lavandulifolia and Lathyrus sp. 99.73 and 99.67 %, respectively. In addition, antifungal effect of AgNPs, synthesized by both extracts, was studied separately on mycelial growth of Dothiorella sarmentorum, in a completely randomized design on potato dextrose agar (PDA) medium. The inhibition rate of mycelial growth was strongly depended on the density of AgNPs and it strongly increased with increasing the density of AgNPs in the PDA medium. AgNPs more than 90 % of them inhibited from the mycelia growth of the fungus at the concentration of 40 µg/mL and higher.

33 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a review of the bio-synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles including gold nanoparticle (AuNPs), silver nanoparticle, AgNPs, platinum nanoparticles, and palladium nanoparticles are first discussed.

18 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This work demonstrates that the chemical reduction method, free of ultrahigh vacuum and/or temperature, presents a new approach for the development of intermetallic metal anodes through the incorporation of various metal precursors.
Abstract: Pure Sn and Si-Sn phases are successfully synthesized by a facile and scalable chemical reduction method. The as-produced Si-Sn nanocomposites exhibit excellent cycling stability, as evidenced by a reversible capacity of 700 mAh/g over 200 cycles, due to the exceptional conductivity and ductility of Sn as well as its buffering effect. More specifically, homogeneous mixing between Si and Sn during the liquid phase reaction helps reduce the maximal stress evolved upon electrochemical cycling by confining the expansion of the electrochemically active metal component. Additionally, the chemical reduction method produces small and uniform particles in the final product that are more favorable to Li+ diffusion and tolerant of mechanical stress and strain. Our work demonstrates that the chemical reduction method, free of ultrahigh vacuum and/or temperature, presents a new approach for the development of intermetallic metal anodes through the incorporation of various metal precursors.

13 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
04 Aug 1994-Nature
TL;DR: In this article, a hybrid organic/inorganic electroluminescent device was constructed based on the recombination of holes injected into a layer of semiconducting p-paraphenylene vinylene (PPV) with electrons injected into the multilayer film of cadmium selenide nanocrystals.
Abstract: ELECTROLUMINESCENT devices have been developed recently that are based on new materials such as porous silicon1 and semiconducting polymers2,3. By taking advantage of developments in the preparation and characterization of direct-gap semiconductor nanocrystals4–6, and of electroluminescent polymers7, we have now constructed a hybrid organic/inorganic electroluminescent device. Light emission arises from the recombination of holes injected into a layer of semiconducting p-paraphenylene vinylene (PPV)8–10 with electrons injected into a multilayer film of cadmium selenide nanocrystals. Close matching of the emitting layer of nanocrystals with the work function of the metal contact leads to an operating voltage11 of only 4V. At low voltages emission from the CdSe layer occurs. Because of the quantum size effect19–24 the colour of this emission can be varied from red to yellow by changing the nanocrystal size. At higher voltages green emission from the polymer layer predominates. Thus this device has a degree of voltage tunability of colour.

3,783 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This review presents an overview of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) preparation by green synthesis approaches that have advantages over conventional methods involving chemical agents associated with environmental toxicity.

3,290 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The short history, specific features and future prospects of research of microbial metabolites, including antibiotics and other bioactive metabolites, are summarized.
Abstract: The short history, specific features and future prospects of research of microbial metabolites, including antibiotics and other bioactive metabolites, are summarized. The microbial origin, diversity of producing species, functions and various bioactivities of metabolites, unique features of their chemical structures are discussed, mainly on the basis of statistical data. The possible numbers of metabolites may be discovered in the future, the problems of dereplication of newly isolated compounds as well as the new trends and prospects of the research are also discussed.

2,706 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the present Communication, a completely "green" synthetic method for producing silver nanoparticles is introduced, by gentle heating of an aqueous starch solution containing silver nitrate and glucose, which produces relatively monodisperse, starchedsilver nanoparticles.
Abstract: In the present Communication, a completely "green" synthetic method for producing silver nanoparticles is introduced. The process is simple, environmentally benign, and quite efficient. By gentle heating of an aqueous starch solution containing silver nitrate and glucose, we produce relatively monodisperse, starched silver nanoparticles. beta-d-Glucose serves as the green reducing agent, while starch serves as the stabilization agent.

2,028 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the size effect on the optical and photophysical properties of semiconductor clusters has been studied in the condensed phase and the current status of materials synthesis and the prospect for making monodisperse clusters of well-defined surfaces has been discussed.
Abstract: Recent advances in the synthesis of semiconductor clusters open a doorway for the systematic study of size-dependent cluster properties in the condensed phase. This article focuses on the size effect on the optical and photophysical properties. The authors first introduce fundamental concepts and proceed to a discussion of recent progress toward the understanding of the quantum size effect and dielectric confinement effect. They then discuss the current status of materials synthesis and the prospect for making monodisperse clusters of well-defined surfaces.

1,892 citations